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Full text of "Annual report of the Commissioner of Animal Industry"

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Public Document No. 98 



tKfje Commontoealtf) of JWastfacJmaette 
ANNUAL REPORT 

Director ofAnimalIndustry 



FOR THE 



Year ending November 30, 1926 



Department of Conservation 





J 



Publication of this Document approved by the Commission on Administration and Finance 
700 3-'27 Order 8298 






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QTfje Commontoealtf) of JttasaacftuaeMS 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION 



Division of Animal Industry, 
Boston, November 30, 1926. 

To the Conntiissio}}er of Conservation: 

The following report of the work of this Division for the year ending November 
30, 1926, is herewith submitted: 

On October 5, 1926, Dr. Lester H. Howard, of Boston, resigned as Director after 
having served in that capacity since January 2, 1915. On November 6, 1926, 
Frank B. Cummings of Newton was appointed by the Governor and Council to 
succeed Dr. Howard. 

The work of this Division has to do with the health of domestic animals particu- 
larly in regard to the prevention, suppression and extirpation of the several con- 
tagious diseases to which this class of animals is subject. 

The activities of the Division are governed by'statute either through laws passed 
by the General Court or by orders made by the director (Sec. 2, Chap. 129, General 
Laws) and approved by the Governor and Council, these orders having the force 
of law. 

The working force of the Division is composed of: 

(1) A Director — appointed by the Governor with the advice and consent of the 
Council for a term of three years. The Director has general charge of the Division 
and has authority to make and enforce reasonable orders, rules and regulations 
relative to the control of contagious diseases of domestic animals. 

(2) Agents — in this Division there are two classes, (a) Men employed on a 
salary basis, i. e., devoting their full time to work of the Division. Of these agents 
two are classed as Chief Veterinary Inspectors, one assigned to headquarters at 
Boston, the other in charge of Quarantine Station at Brighton; seven as District 
Veterinarians having more or less direct charge of a given section of the State; four 
as Veterinary Inspectors with headquarters at Boston, and two as Assistant Vet- 
erinary Inspectors, laymen, one assigned to the quarantine station at Brighton, 
the otner acting as assistant in field work, (b) Men employed on a per diem basis 
but under civil service regulations. These agents are mostly veterinarians engaged 
in private practice to whom special assignments are given when such service is 
required. 

(3) Inspectors of Animals. Every town and city in Massachusetts is in accord- 
ance with law required to appoint annually in March one or more persons to act as 
inspector of animals for their respective city or town. The duty of an inspector 
of animals is to comply with and enforce all orders and regulations directed to them 
by the Director of the Division of Animal Industry and to investigate reports of 
suspected contagious diseases in animals. 

The diseases most often demanding the attention of the Division are in the order 
of their frequency and importance, — tuberculosis in cattle, cholera and allied dis- 
eases in swine, rabies in dogs and other animals, glanders in horses, anthrax, black- 
leg and hemorrhagic septicemia in cattle, miscellaneous diseases such as mange in 
cattle and horses, parasitic diseases in sheep, foot-and-mouth disease in cattle, etc. 

Following is a gross summary of the Division's work for the year ending November 
30, 1926: 



P. D. 98 3 

GENERAL SUMMARY 

Cattle 

6,129 Massachusetts cattle physically examined by agents and inspectors. 
160 Massachusetts cattle tuberculin tested at Brighton Stockyards. 
37,675 Tuberculin tests made under provisions of Chapter 353, Acts of 1922. 
1,753 Interstate cattle tested. 
15,042 Interstate and State cattle examined at stockyards, Brighton, and their test 

records viseed. 
9,101 Interstate cattle identified by inspectors at other points. 
647 Animals on 72 farms in 30 towns given preventive treatment against 
blackleg. 
15 Animals given preventive treatment against anthrax. 
132 Preventive treatments given against hemorrhagic septicemia. 
156 Visits to unsanitary premises were made by district veterinarians. 
8 Reported cases of actinomycosis were investigated. 

Horses 

27 Horses examined for glanders. 
1,575 Horses received on permits and released. 

Dogs 
1,714 Cases of possible rabies in animals were investigated. 

Swine 

96,393 Treatments given in prevention or cure of hog cholera. 
32,833 Treatments given in prevention or cure of hemorrhagic septicemia. 
2,173 Treatments given in prevention or cure of necro-bacillosis. 

Bovine Tuberculosis 

The work in connection with the eradication of tuberculosis in cattle continues 
as the most important activity of the Division. For convenience the record of this 
work is divided into three classes: 

(1) The examination of cattle reported as showing physical symptoms of disease. 

(2) The tuberculin testing of cattle. 

(3) Supervision of the interstate movement of cattle into Massachusetts. 

1. The examination of cattle reported as showing physical symptoms of disease. 
Any person who has reason to suspect the existence of any contagious disease in a 
domestic animal is required under the law (Sec. 28, Chap. 129) to report same. If 
upon examination the animal is found to be affected with tuberculosis, it may by 
order of the Director be condemned and killed (Sec. 11, Chap. 129) and an amount 
not exceeding $25 (Sec. 12-A., Chap. 129) paid the owner if the animal had been 
owned by him for a period of not less than 60 days, and had been kept within the 
Commonwealth for six consecutive months both periods being next prior to date of 
killing. Under this section 558 head of cattle were reported to the Division of 
which 417 were killed and lesions of tuberculosis found; 8 were killed and no lesions 
found; 3 were slaughtered by owner and lesions found; 7 were slaughtered by 
owner and no lesions found; 25 died prior to examination by a Division agent and 
98 were released, physical examination not indicating tuberculosis. In connection 
with this section of the work it is required that the agent inspecting the animal also 
make a careful physical examination of all other cattle in the building where the 
suspect is housed. If the animal is condemned disinfection of the premises occupied 
by said animal is ordered. The local inspector of animals is then required to report 
when disinfection has been properly done, and at the expiration of three months 
is required to make a careful physical examination of all cattle then on the premises. 



4 P. D. 98 

2. The tuberculin testing of cattle. The use of tuberculin as a diagnostic agent 
is (Sec. 32, Chap. 129, Gen. Laws) restricted to cattle brought into the Common- 
wealth — cattle in quarantine stations at Brighton and Somerville — cattle re- 
ported by a competent veterinary surgeon as tuberculous upon physical examina- 
tion and to cattle the owner of which makes a written request for test. That the 
trend of rattle ownen is to free their herds of tuberculosis by the use of tuberculin 
in the testing of cattle is evidenced by the increased demand each year for this class 
of work. While the law (Chap. 353, Acts of 1922) commonly referred to as the 
"Request Test Law" is in no way compulsory, a written request being required 
before the test can be applied, — the increasing number of local boards of health 
making regulations requiring that unpasteurized milk intended for sale be from 
tuberculin tested cows is gradually forcing into testing many dairy owners that 
otherwise would not apply. 

This year a decrease is shown in the number of herds presented for first test — 
490 as compared with 882 in 1925, and in the total number of tests made, 1878 
against 2093 in 1925. This decrease was due to two conditions, namely, — the 
lack of a sufficient Federal allotment to insure payment by the Federal government 
of claims of owners for reacting cattle and the temporary discontinuance of all test- 
ing by the Division pending investigation of the so-called cattle frauds. Through 
the cooperation of the State with the United States Government in the testing of 
cattle, Massachusetts owners of reacting cattle are, if certain specific rules and 
regulations are complied with, allowed compensation by the Federal government 
to an amount usually equal to that paid by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
The Federal allotment to Massachusetts for this purpose does not equal the amount 
appropriated by the State itself and is rarely sufficient to meet all claims for pay- 
ment. The appropriation for the Federal fiscal year beginning July 1, 1925, became 
exhausted in November 1925, and as a new appropriation was not available until 
July 1, 1926, no test or retest during that period was conducted by this Division 
except on receipt of a so-called "waiver", i. e., a form signed by the owner of the 
cattle to be tested agreeing to accept State payment only, to be supplemented by 
Federal payment provided an additional Federal allotment was received for that 
purpose. This had a natural tendency to retard the work as shown by the de- 
creased number of requests for new tests received, and by the postponement of the 
making of many retests during the period between November 15, 1925jand July 1, 
1926, seven months of our fiscal year. On August 17th all testing by the Division 
was discontinued pending an investigation of reported irregularities in connection 
with tuberculin testing in Hampden County and which investigation has since 
extended to all the counties in the Commonwealth. On October 11th testing was 
resumed but limited to herds previously tested, that is to retest work. The making 
of new or first tests was not authorized until late in November, too late to be 
included in this year's record. 

Following is the year's record of tests: 

1,878 herds tested; 37,675 cattle tested (13,807 purebred, 23,868 grade). 

6,337 cattle reacted (987 purebred, 5,350 grade). 

First test, 490 herds, 6,814 head, 3,638 reacted. 

Second test, 468 herds, 5,693 head, 795 reacted. 

Third test, 636 herds, 17,862 head, 1,779 reacted. 

Accredited herds, 284 herds, 7,306 head, 125 reacted. 

The percentage of reactors found to all tests equals 16.8%. 

1st test— 53.4%. 2nd test— 13.9%. 3rd test— 9.9%. Accredited Herds 1.8%. 

Tests were made in 1,615 different herds containing 30,298 head of cattle, 5,582 
or 18.4% reacting. A second test was made in 251 of these herds containing 6,756 
head, 654 reacting, and a third test in 12 of these herds containing 621 head, 101 
reacting. 

On November 30, 1926, there were listed 1,875 herds containing 28,495 head 
under supervision as compared with last year's figures of 1,716 herds, 26,646 head. 
The above figures indicate 7% of the herds and 14.7% of the cattle population of 
the State as being under test. 



P. D. 98 5 

444 herds containing 9,736 head of cattle have received Accredited herd certificates 
from the United States Bureau of Animal Industry having passed two annual tests 
without a reactor. 

561 additional herds containing 6,314 head of cattle have passed one clean test. 

293 herds containing 1,445 cattle, two clean tests. 

This makes a total of 1,298 herds in which no reacting cattle were found at last 
test and which herds contained 17,495 head of cattle. 

These figures show an increase over last year's record which was as follows : 376 
herds, 8,105 head — accredited; 527 herds, 5,777 head — one clean test; 187 herds, 
1,002 head — two clean tests. Total — 1,090 herds, 14,884 head of cattle. 

The following tabulation is a record of the "Request Test" work by counties 
for the year: 

TOTAL TESTS UNDER TEST ACCREDITED 

Herds Head Reacted Herds Head Herds Head 

BARNSTABLE 242 1,357 68 220 1,041 44 445 

BERKSHIRE 207 4,609 336 259 4,750 72 1,740 

BRISTOL 56 1,734 149 47 1,346 21 827 

DUKES 10 104 15 35 269 16 121 

ESSEX 54 2,355 112 48 1,658 21 405 

FRANKLIN 67 2,059 121 66 1,635 40 1,155 

HAMPDEN 100 2,504 977 100 1,467 42 783 

HAMPSHIRE 77 2,879 645 74 1,775 24 582 

MIDDLESEX 273 5,360 1,201 225 3,151 26 555 

NANTUCKET ... 9 162 2 24 

NORFOLK - 198 3,746 606 214 2,876 34 488 

PLYMOUTH 291 3,308 461 278 2,648 32 542 

SUFFOLK 9 101 17 15 113 3 6 

WORCESTER 294 7,559 1,629 285 5,604 67 2,063 

TOTAL 1,878 37,675 6,337 1,875 28,495 444 9,736 

These 1,878 herd tests were conducted by: 

Division Agents 1,178 herds 28,160 head 5,345 reacted 

Per diem agents 91 " 1,689 " 63 

Federal agents 452 " 5,523 " , 656 

Private veterinarians under authorization: 157 " 2,303 " 273 " 

For purpose of identification it is required that any bovine animal which reacts 
to a tuberculin test be tagged by insertion into the left ear of a metal tag, this tag 
furnished by this department is marked MASS. REACTOR and bears a serial 
number. For some time it has been felt that the ease with which this tag may be 
removed opens the way for unscrupulous persons to defeat the purpose of the re- 
quirement by either changing the tag from one animal to another, usually of in- 
ferior quality, or removing it altogether. In an endeavor to prevent action of this 
kind legislation was asked for at this year's session of the Legislature which if 
passed would have allowed the branding of reacting cattle. This recommendation 
of the Commissioner was referred to the next General Court. Rumor that changing 
of tags was actually taking place resulted in the issuing of an order by the Commis- 
sioner to brand all reacting cattle, which order late in September was approved by 
the Governor and Council. This order should prevent reacting cattle from being 
disposed of for any purpose other than immediate slaughter and should stop to some 
extent the alleged practice of changing of ear tags. 

Too much stress can not be given to the fact that the detection of tuberculosis 
through employment of the tuberculin test is only one factor in the cleaning up of 
an infected herd, district or area. Removal of reacting cattle without proper dis- 
infection of premises, careful selection of new purchases, and constant vigilance of 
the cattle owner against reinfection will never result in eradication of this disease. 
Floors, walls, ceilings, mangers, drinking fountains and yards should be given a 
thorough cleansing and disinfection; manure should be removed and exposed through 
spreading to the rays of the sun. No additions to a herd should be made without 
knowledge of the history of the herd from which animal is derived and then only 
on approved record of test. Vigilance should be observed against possible contact 
with visitors from badly infected premises or through direct contact across line 
fences, etc. 



6 P. D. 98 

The question of replacements for cattle which react and are slaughtered is one 
that gravely concerns all herd owners. The slaughter of 23,569 reacting cattle in 
the last four years has resulted in a serious shortage in the available supply to be 
found in the three States to which Massachusetts naturally turns for its replace- 
ments, namely, — Vermont, Maine and New Hampshire. In an attempt to relieve 
this shortage buyers have in the past year made shipments from points as far away 
as Pennsylvania, "Wisconsin, Nebraska and Canada. 

Conditions surrounding shipments through the Brighton Stockyards to which 
market many buyers are obliged to go for purchase of cattle have not been entirely 
satisfactory, but changes are now under consideration whereby it is hoped to pro- 
vide a safe market for the purchase of cattle shipped thereto from herds being main- 
tained under State and Federal supervision. 

During the year there were 3,971 Massachusetts cattle intended for dairy pur- 
poses consigned to the quarantine station at Brighton; 3,811 were accompanied by 
satisfactory certificates of test; 160 were untested. Department regulations require 
that all cattle leaving the quarantine station for dairy purposes must have passed a 
satisfactory tuberculin test, accordingly, all untested cattle are tested upon arrival. 
As a result of such test to the 160 head of cattle referred to above, 38 or 24% reacted. 

3. Supervision of the interstate movement of cattle into Massachusetts. Massa- 
chusetts regulations (Department Order No. 35) require that all cattle shipped into 
this state, with the exception of cattle consigned to a slaughtering establishment 
maintained under Federal inspection and cattle consigned to the quarantine sta- 
tions at Brighton and Somerville, must be accompanied by a permit for shipment 
issued by the Director of the Division of Animal Industry. Massachusetts law 
(Chap. 495, Acts of 1924) requires that cattle intended for dairy purposes shall be 
inspected and passed as healthy prior to shipment to this State. On arrival cattle 
must remain under quarantine until identified and released, identification being 
made from the health certificate or record of test forwarded by the livestock official 
of the state in which shipment originated. For the convenience of cattle buyers 
and shippers this Division maintains an office at the public stock yards at Brighton 
for purpose ot identifying and releasing cattle shipped thereto for sale purposes, for 
issuing of health certificates if called for, checking of State reactors and for applying 
the tuberculin test to such cattle as are brought in untested. During the year 12,809 
dairy cattle originating from the following States were received and checked at these 
yards: Maine 5,970; New Hampshire 3,781; Vermont 2,691; Connecticut 22; New 
York 215; Minnesota 90; Ohio 20; Canada 20. Eleven thousand two hundred and 
thirty-one were released on approved records of test; 1,578 held and tested. Of the 
1,578 head held and tested, 124 reacted. 

At other points in the State there were received on permits issued from this office 
11,577 head of cattle from the following states: California 26; Canada 242; Colorado 
12; Connecticut 563; Indiana 93; Iowa 3; Kansas 1; Maine 1,267; Maryland 13; 
Michigan 71; Minnesota 216; Missouri 15; New Hampshire 2,219; New Jersey 765; 
New York 1,105; North Carolina 1 ; Ohio 84; Oklahoma 17; Pennsylvania 92; Rhode 
Island 692; Texas 1; Vermont 3,404; Virginia 35; Washington 17; West Virginia 53; 
Wisconsin 570. Of these 11,577 cattle, 2,301 were for immediate slaughter; 1,166 
for exhibition purposes and 8,110 for dairy purposes. Of the 8,110, 7,935 were 
accepted on tests made before shipment and 175 were tested after arrival. 

That cattle untested and unaccompanied by a permit are brought into the state 
in violation of both State and Federal laws is frequently drawn to the attention of 
this Division. Efforts are constantly made to prevent this illegal traffic and persons 
apprehended are promptly prosecuted. Cooperation by border states in prevention 
of this violation of regulations is being sought at this time. 

Contagious Diseases of Swine 

The general policy regarding the prevention and cure of swine diseases adopted 
by this Division has been followed during the past year. The increased demand 
for this work indicates that the swine owners appreciate the value of the service and 
realize the necessity of protecting swine against the ravages of disease if the raising 



P. D. 98 7 

of this class of animals is to be at all profitable. The larger part of the work in con- 
nection with the immunizing of swine against cholera is done by agents of this divi- 
sion, the services of these agents are furnished without cost to the swine owner — 
the owner has, however, to pay for the serum or virus used, payment being made 
direct to the biologic house supplying the material. Experience has shown that 
swine fed on garbage are particularly subject to outbreaks of hog cholera unless the 
individual members of the herd have been previously immunized against the disease 
by use of the so-called simultaneous treatment, i. e. — the injection of anti-hog 
cholera serum and hog cholera virus. If treatment is given early danger from this 
s ource is practically eliminated, the treatment assuring life immunity. 

An outbreak of cholera covering a wide expanse of territory occurred during the 
Summer and Fall in the Western States, and was to some extent felt here in the 
East. An alarming shortage of serum and virus necessitated modification of gov- 
ernment requirements surrounding the manufacture of these products in order to 
facilitate its production. Fortunately the biologic houses holding permits to ship 
this class of material to Massachusetts had a sufficient supply furnished to this 
Division to provide for all our needs. In accordance with our requirements, all 
serum and virus shipped to this state is tested as to its potency at a test house main- 
tained at Tewksbury, thus insuring material up to the required standard. During 
the year 96,393 treatments in prevention or cure of cholera were administered, an 
increase of 11,417 over those applied in 1925. These 96,393 treatments were given 
on 805 different premises in 182 cities and towns and required the making of 2,163 
visits by one or more field men. Private veterinarians holding permits as required 
by department Order No. 12 applied 108 treatments during the year. The graph 
at end of this report gives a record of treatments applied since this class of work was 
begun. 

Hemorrhagic Septicemia: Co-existent with or often following cholera, hemorrhagic 
septicemia is found to occur. In many instances fatal, death occurring in a com- 
paratively few hours, it necessitates early and prompt attention. Preventive treat- 
ment by use of aggressin and curative treatment by use of bacterin or serum is 
resorted to and meets with marked success if employed before the disease has gained 
too strong a foothold. During the past year 32,833 treatments have been applied. 

Necro-bacillosis: While not so prevalent as hemorrhagic septicemia, necro-bacil- 
losis is called to our attention occasionally. One outbreak was reported this year; 
2,173 treatments being given. 

Rabies 

An increase in the number of positive cases of rabies this past year of 75 cases 
over the report of 1925 is recorded. There is probably no contagious disease of 
animals which is regarded by the general public with more fear than is rabies. Once 
its symptoms in man or animal are manifest there is little if any possibility of pre- 
venting a fatal termination. > Notwithstanding this fact there is a general disregard 
of laws relating to dogs, the usual carrier of the infection. If the proper County, 
City or Town officials would compel enforcement of the law which requires all dogs 
to be licensed, which law makes it obligatory for licensed dogs to wear a collar bear- 
ing name and address of owner, and would see that all dogs not so equipped were 
humanely destroyed, this procedure by removing the unlicensed and stray dogs 
would greatly aid in preventing spread of rabies. Many cases are brought to our 
attention which we are unable to trace to their source on account of lack of collar 
or distinguishing mark. 

The quarantine methods employed in the past few years having proven most effec- 
tive, are still followed. Animals known to have been in contact with a rabid animal 
are ordered restrained for a period of 90 days from date of said contact. Animals 
known to have bitten persons are restrained for 14 days from date injury was in- 
flicted. In towns or cities where rabies has occurred the local officials have the 
power to enforce a general or town quarantine. The immunizing of dogs against 
rabies, although proving to be effective in some states, has not been very generally 
adopted. The Division's records relating to rabies are divided into three classes: 



8 P. D. 98 

1. Animals exhibiting symptoms resembling rabies. 

2. Animals known to have been in contact with a case of rabies. 

3. Animals which have been reported as having inflicted injuries by biting or 
scratching. 

During the year 1,714 animals were reported for diagnosis, quarantine or observa- 
tion and with the 84 cases brought forward for disposal from previous year made a 
total of 1,798 animals. These cases are recorded as follows: 

Class 1. Reported as rabies: 293 dogs and 1 cat proved to be rabid on either 
physical examination, laboratory examination or both; 53 dogs, 2 cats and 1 cow 
were proved not to have rabies and 5 dogs were considered as suspicious, i. e., 
symptoms not definite enough to justify a positive diagnosis. 

Class 2. Animals in contact with a case of rabies; 268 dogs, 2 cats and 2 pigs 
were released after a 90 day period of quarantine as no symptoms of rabies had 
developed. Thirty-six dogs, 5 cats and 1 pig were killed by owners or died without 
symptoms of rabies. Twenty-four dogs and 6 pigs developed definite symptoms of 
rabies. Five dogs and 1 cat died examination indicating death due to a condition 
other than rabies. Thirty-nine dogs were under quarantine at the close of the 
fiscal year. 

Class 3. Animals inflicting injury by biting or scratching: 912 dogs and 3 cats 
were released after a 14 day period of quarantine, no symptoms of rabies developing. 
Sixteen dogs were killed by owners and no examination made; 88 dogs and 5 cats 
were killed, laboratory examination not indicating rabies; 29 dogs and 1 cat were 
under observation at close of fiscal year. 

From this record it is shown that 317 dogs, 6 pigs and 1 cat were diagnosed as 
rabies. One thousand two hundred fifty-one persons were reported as being bitten 
or scratched by dogs, 14 by cats and 2 by horses. Of the 324 animals recorded as 
positive cases of rabies 93 dogs were reported as having bitten 180 persons and 1 cat 
as having bitten 5 persons. Of the 1,714 animals reported 100 dogs and 1 cat are 
recorded as "owners unknown"; 26 dogs and the 1 cat proving to be rabid. 

Laboratory examination of the brains of 342 animals indicated 203 to have been 
affected with rabies. 

Glanders 

Glanders, a disease of horses, for years prevalent in this State has apparently 
been eradicated as far as Massachusetts is concerned as not a positive case has been 
found this year. Considered on account of its transmissibility to man, generally 
with fatal results, and on account of its economic significance to horse owners, as 
one of the most important animal diseases with which this Division has had to 
contend, it now occupies a minor place in the activities of the Division. Regard- 
less of the fact that not a case of glanders was found this year it is unreasonable to 
expect that an occasional case may not arise, as from the nature of the disease it is 
known the infection may remain latent for years before developing active symptoms. 

Reports of horses showing symptoms of the disease are given immediate atten- 
tion and in addition to physical examination in most cases the animals are subjected 
to the ophthalmic test or blood is taken for laboratory examination and in some 
instances both tests are made. During the year 27 horses were reported as suspects. 
Twenty-five samples of blood were taken from 23 of the 27 and ophthalmic tests 
applied to 14 with negative results. 

Order No. 36 requiring permits for horses intended for shipment to this state 
from New York, New Jersey, Rhode Island and Connecticut still remains in force. 
This order has served its purpose well, but need for its enforcement is past and 
revocation of the order is now under consideration. One thousand five hundred 
and seventy-five horses arrived in the State during the year on permits, 6 of which 
were held for test but later released. 



t. D. 98 9 

Miscellaneous Diseases 

Anthrax: Not a case of anthrax has been reported during the year. As the 
causative agent of this disease, a spore bearing bacillus, is very resistant to destruc- 
tion, remaining in the soil for years, an occasional outbreak is apt to occur in 
previously infected areas. Care should accordingly be taken to avoid the use of 
portions of buildings or pastures where the disease has previously been found unless 
anthrax preventive treatment has been given animals placed on those premises. 
Fifteen head of cattle were given preventive treatment by division veterinarians 
this year. 

Blackleg: The causative agent of this disease like that of anthrax is found to 
infect premises particularly pastures for years. Such pastures should accordingly 
be avoided unless preventive blackleg treatment is given to animals to be pastured 
there. It is a disease peculiar to young cattle, usually occurring in cattle under two 
and a half to three years of age generally during the pasture season; its sudden 
development with early and high mortality rate often leads cattle owners to suspect 
the dead animals to have been killed by lightning. Preventive treatment if given 
before infection occurs is nearly 100% effective — the acquired immunity lasting 
for about a year. Treatment is usually given just prior to turning cattle to pasture, 
thereby insuring them against this disease. This year treatment by division agents 
was given to 647 animals on 72 farms in 30 towns. 

Actinomycosis: A disease generally of cattle and usually affecting the bones of the 
jaw is called to our attention each year in different sections of the state. If found 
in early stages it is amenable to treatment recoveries often occurring. If treatment 
is not desired, the affected animal is condemned for slaughter. Eight cases in 7 
towns were reported this past year. 

Mange : Mange, a parasitic disease of animals — at times prevalent in horses and 
cattle and requiring prompt quarantine measures — has been reported on only three 
premises this year, 5 head of cattle being affected, all of which responded to treat- 
ment and were released. 

Infectious or Contagious Abortion: This disease now recognized as a specific in- 
fection is without doubt the most widely disseminated of all contagious animal dis- 
eases, being found more or less prevalent in every section of the country. Authori- 
ties vary regarding not only the method to employ in its treatment but also as to 
the advisability of quarantine or condemnation of affected animals. No action has 
as yet been taken by this division to regulate the movement or reporting of cattle 
affected with this disease. Laboratory service is, however, offered to veterinarians 
or livestock owners for purpose of examination of blood or specimens for detection 
of bacillus abortus, now generally conceded to be the causative agent. There were 
received this year 116 samples of blood for examination taken from cattle on 19 
premises. Of this number 39 were diagnosed as positive. 

Tuberculosis in Swine: This disease in swine is not found to any extent in Massa- 
chusetts, but is reported occasionally, usually found at time of slaughter. Although 
generally found in garbage fed swine, investigation has at times led to discovery of 
tubercular cattle on the premises on which the affected swine originated. Disin- 
fection of the premises and a physical examination of cattle thereon are required 
when the disease is reported. During the year 3 cases were reported. 

Laboratory Service 

During the year the bacteriological laboratory of the State Department of Public 
Health has rendered valuable service in the examination of specimens submitted for 
diagnoses. Its service is of especial value in connection with the examination of 
brains of animals for diagnoses for rabies; examination of samples of blood for 
glanders in horses and for infectious abortion in cattle. During the year the brains 
of 331 dogs, 8 cats, 1 cow and 2 horses were examined for rabies, 25 samples of blood 
for glanders and 116 samples of blood for infectious abortion. In addition to the 
above the following specimens were examined : Anthrax, 5; Blackleg, 1 ; Hemorrhagic 
Septicemia, 8; Tuberculosis, 10; Miscellaneous, 5. 



10 P. D. 98 

Annual Inspection of Farm Animals and Premises 

Under the provisions of Section 19, Chapter 129 of the General'Laws, an order 
was issued by the 1 Hrector on January 12, L926, to every inspector of animals in the 
cities and towns of the Commonwealth calling for an inspection of all cattle, sheep 
and swine ami of the premises where kept. 

This order called for the completion of the inspection by March 1, and for a report. 
of the same to be promptly forwarded to the Division's office. The inspectors' 
reports came forward in most instances in good season and were duly examined and 
tabulated in minute detail. 

These reports constitute a "census" of the cattle, sheep and swine on 26,666 farms 
or premises in the State where these species of animals are kept. From these reports 
the following facts are gathered: — 

The number of cattle of all kinds has decreased from the 1925 record of 204,163 
to 192,777 — a decrease of 11,386 head. 

The number of swine reported by local inspectors of animals in the Spring months 
of this year was 70,062. 

The number of sheep reported was 10,693. 

No meetings of Inspectors of Animals were held this year as it was decided to 
postpone these meetings until the latter part of March, 1927. 

Recommendations for Legislation 

1. Tuberculin Testing of Cattle. — Under the present law there is nothing to pre- 
vent a person acquiring cattle immediately prior to an application for a tuberculin 
test regardless of whether said person is the owner or not, or presenting cattle for 
test on premises other than those of said owner and thereby defeating the law, the 
purpose of which is to maintain herds free from tuberculosis. 

The proposed amendments require that the person applying for the test shall have 
owmed the cattle on the premises where tested for sixty days or have added them 
to his herd on proper test. The act also provides that an application for a tuberculin 
test shall be signed by the owner only. These measures should help to prevent 
fraud against the Commonwealth. 

2. Reimbursement by the Commonwealth for the Slaughter of Certain Cattle Affected 
with Tuberculosis. — During each of the past three years the Federal allotment for 
reacting cattle became exhausted. This exhaustion of funds apportioned by the 
Federal government for payment to citizens of Massachusetts for cattle which react 
to a tuberculin test applied under the State and Federal cooperative agreement, 
deprives many Massachusetts cattle owners of Federal payment for such cattle 
regardless of the fact that said owners may have complied with the rules and regula- 
tions under which this test is applied. Failure of such payment is a hardship for 
farmers or cattle owners who are attempting to maintain herds of cattle free from 
tuberculosis. This act would remedy the possible lack of Federal funds and en- 
courage cattle owners in the continuance of this work by enabling the Common- 
wealth to pay the share of the Federal Government when their appropriation 
became exhausted. 

Financial Statement 

Appropriation for the salary of the Director, chapter 79, 

Acts of 1926 - . . $3,500 00 

Expended during the year for the salary of the Director $3,206 76 

Unexpended balance 293 24 

$3,500 00 

Appropriation for personal services of clerks and stenog- 
raphers, chapter 79, Acts of 1926 .... $9,300 00 
Transferred from Appropriation for Extraordinary 

Expenses 110 00 

Total amount appropriated $9,410 00 



P. D. 98 11 

Expended during the year for personal services of 
clerks and stenographers . . . . . . $9,410 00 

Appropriation for services, other than personal includ- 
ing printing the annual report, traveling expenses of 
the Director, and office supplies and equipment, 
chapter 79, Acts of 1926 ...... • $4,300 00 

Expended during the year for the following purposes : 
Books and maps ($52 less $2 Refund) . $50 00 

Express and messenger service 288 80 

Postage 787 51 

Printing report 57 95 

Other printing 592 85 

Telephone and telegrams ($839.48 less $26.85 Refunds) 812 63 

Stationery and office supplies ' 974 32 

Expenses of the Director 74 09 



Total expenditure ■ . $3,638 15 

Unexpended balance 661 85 



$4,300 00 



Appropriation for personal services of veterinarians and 
agents engaged in the work of extermination of con- 
tagious diseases among domestic animals, chapter 79, 
Acts of 1926 , $44,500 00 

Brought forward from 1925 Appropriation ... 25 00 

Transferred from Appropriation for Extraordinary Ex- 
penses . . . ... 750 00 

Total amount appropriated $45,275 00 

Expended during the year for the following purposes : 

Services of salaried agents . . . . . . . $35,405 00 

Services of per diem agents . . . . . . 8,237 00 

Labor hired 104 00 



Total expenditure . ' $43,746 00 

Unexpended balance . 1,529 00 

$45,275 00 

Appropriation for the traveling expenses of veterinarians 

and agents, chapter 79, Acts of 1926 . . $22,000 00 
Supplementary Appropriation, chapter 398, Acts of 

1926 1,000 00 

Transferred from Appropriation for Extraordinary 

Expenses 250 00 



Total amount appropriated $23,250 00 

Expended during the year for the following purposes : 
Traveling expenses of regular agents .... $18,816 16 
Traveling expenses of per diem agents ($3,799.80 less $70 

Refund) 3,729 80 

Total expenditure $22,545 96 

Unexpended balance 704 04 

$23,250 00 

Appropriation for reimbursement of owners of horses 

killed during the present and previous years, travel, 

when allowed, of inspectors of animals, incidental 

expenses of killing and burial, quarantine and 

emergency services and for laboratory and vet- 
erinary supplies and equipment, chapter 79, Acts 

of 1926 $5,700 00 



12 

Expended during the year for the following purposes 
1 horse condemned and killed on account of glanders 

(1926) 

Supplies for veterinary inspectors 

Laundry 

Antiseptics, biologies and disinfectants 
Thermometers, needles, syringes, etc 
Ear-tags, punches, chains, etc. . 
Expenses of killing and burial 
Quarantine expenses .... 
Sundries 



P. D. 98 



Total expenditure 
Unexpended balance 



Appropriation for reimbursement of owners of cattle 
killed as authorized by chapter 304, Acts of 1924, 
and chapter 129, General Laws, as amended by 
chapter 353, Acts of 1922, during present and 
previous years, chapter 79, Acts of 1926 . 
Brought forward from 1925 Appropriation . 

Total amount appropriated 



$50 00 
490 20 
389 73 
238 85 
475 35 
3,214 75 

23 00 
341 25 

40 25 

$5,263 38 
436 62 



$200,000 00 
13,083 35 



$5,700 00 



$213,083 35 



Expended during the year for the following : 
5,807 head of cattle killed in 1924, 1925 and 1926 (chap- 
ter 353, Acts of 1922) ($158,707.96 less $950 Refund) $157,757 96 
415 head of cattle killed (physical cases) 10,727 57 

Total expenditure $168,485 53 

Unexpended balance 44,597 82 



$213,083 35 



The average amount paid for condemned tuberculous cattle for the year was 
$24.48. 

The average amount paid for cattle slaughtered under the provisions of Chapter 
353, Acts of 1922, was $47.46 for registered purebred cattle and $23.57 for grade 
cattle. 

Sixty claims for reimbursement for cattle condemned and killed as physical cases 
of tuberculosis during the year remain unsettled, these claims amounting to $1,470. 

Two hundred and eighty-six unpaid claims covering 2,886 cattle, to which pro- 
visions of Chapter 353, Acts of 1922, apply, remain unpaid, amounting to $74,309.94. 

There has been received a refund of $23.22 on account of previous year's expenses. 
There has been received during the year from the sale of hides and carcasses of 
condemned animals $38.47. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRANK B. CUMMINGS, Director. 



APPENDIX 

The following graphs show the work of the Division of Animal Industry in control 
of the principal contagious diseases ot animals for a period of years. 



P. D. 98 



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Public Document No. 98 



(Efje Commontoealtf) of jifflasfsacfjutfettjj 



ANNUAL REPORT ' 



OF THE 



DIRECTOR OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY 



FOR THE 



Year ending November 30, 1927 

e/ 




Publication of this Document approved by the Commission on Administration and Finance 
lM-&-'28. No. 2343 



ommonwe 

tlfje Commonujfaltl) of f*laa*ac&uaett* 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION 



Division of Animal Industry 
Boston, November 30, 1927 
To the Commissioner of Conservation: 

The report of the work of this Division for the year ending November 
30, 1927, is respectfully submitted herewith. The function of the divi- 
sion is the prevention, suppression and when possible the extirpation of 
contagious diseases of domestic animals. The success of the year's work 
can be measured to some extent by the increase in amount of preventive 
work done which should and does (with one notable exception — Rabies) 
reflect a decrease in number of cases of transmissible diseases reported. 

GENERAL SUMMARY 

Cattle 

5,184 Massachusetts cattle physically examined by agents or inspectors 
— a decrease of 15% 
113 Massachusetts cattle tuberculin tested at Brighton stockyards — 
a decrease of 29% 
50,429 Tuberculin tests made under provisions of Request Test Act — an 
increase of 33-1/3% 
730 Interstate cattle tuberculin tested 
14,676 Interstate and State cattle examined at stockyards, Brighton and 
their test records viseed 
9,267 Interstate cattle identified by inspectors at other points 
748 Animals on 81 farms in 34 towns given preventive treatment 

against blackleg 
372 Preventive treatments against hemorrhagic septicemia 
318 Physical cases Of bovine tuberculosis — 102 less than previous 
year 
4 Reported cases of actinomycosis were investigated 
165 Visits to unsanitary premises were made by district veterina- 
rians 

Horses 

24 Horses examined for glanders — 1 positive case 
1,297 Horses received on permits and released 

Dogs 
3,198 Cases of possible rabies were investigated — an increase of 86% 

Swine 
114,019 Treatments given in prevention or cure of hog cholera — an in- 
crease of 18% 
25,324 Treatments given in prevention or cure of hemorrhagic septi- 
cemia — a decrease of 23% 

Bovine Tuberculosis 
The work in connection with the eradication of tuberculosis in cattle 
still continues as the most important activity of the Division. The "ex- 
posure" of the fraudulent owner testing in 1926 had a tendency to slow 
up the work as regards applications for new tests. However, with re- 
turning confidence interest has been renewed as evidenced by an increase 



1926 


1927 


444 


622 


9,736 


12,951 


561 


970 


6,314 


9,742 


293 


397 


1,445 


2,264 


1,298 


1,989 



P. D. 98 3 

of 90% in number of first or original tests made over previous year, 933 
in 1927 compared with 490 in 1926. Other gains are as follows : 

An increase of 178 accredited herds 
" 3,215 " cattle 
" 409 herds passing one clean test 
"■■ 3,428 cattle " " " " 

" 104 herds " two " " 
° 819 cattle " " " " 

" 691 herds showing no reactors 

We now have 24,957 clean cattle in herds in which no reactors were found 
at the last test, a gain of 7,462 over previous year. This has been accom- 
plished at a decreased indemnity expense to the state, the obligation in- 
curred for indemnity for the year 1927 being $57,834.59 less than pre- 
vious year, notwithstanding an increase of 33-1/3% in testing. This 
work has been carried on under the provisions of what is commonly re- 
ferred to as the Request Test Law (Chap. 353 Acts of 1922 and amend- 
ments thereto) in accordance with which tuberculin testing is done only 
on written request of owner. The so-called Area Test Bill (Chapter 335 
Acts of 1927), approved April 27, 1927, operative ninety clays later gave 
authority as follows: 

"Section 33 B. Whenever not less than eighty-five per centum 
of the cattle permanently kept in a town are, upon application 
of their owners, being tested for bovine tuberculosis under the 
supervision of the director, the director may apply the same 
test to all other cattle in such town." 

The power thus invested in the Director has never been invoked because 
it was felt that this procedure would work an injustice to the cattle own- 
ers until such time as a larger indemnity (comparable to that allowed 
by other states) had been provided. That a substantial increase in in^ 
demnity should be provided by the next legislature is the writer's sincere 
belief. , 

For convenience the record of this work is divided into three classes. 

(1) The examination of cattle reported as showing physical symptoms 
of disease. 

The work of the department in connection with this classification is 
authorized under Chapter 129 Sec. 29 (requiring report of the existence 
of contagious disease in domestic animals), Sec. 11 (examination and 
condemnation of animals found to be affected with tuberculosis), and Sec. 
12-A (payment for cattle condemned). 

The following tabulation shows disposition made of 421 head of cattle 
quarantined or reported ,under this section of the work: 





Condemned 


♦Permit 


to Kill 


Died 


Relea 




Lesions 
found 


No 

Lesions 

found 


Lesions 
found 


No 

Lesions 
found 






FORWARD, 1926 

1926 
DECEMBER 

1927 

JANUARY 

FEBRUARY 


5 

17 

42 
41 


1 

2 
1 

1 


1 
2 

1 

1 


1 
1 

1 
1 

2 

1 


2 

2 
2 
3 

1 
1 
4 
2 

3 

1 


4 

12 
16 


MARCH 

APRIL 

MAY 

JUNE 

JULY 

AUGUST 


43 
19 
32 
18 
25 
14 


6 
6 
6 
2 
3 
6 


SEPTEMBER 

OCTOBER 

NOVEMBER 

INCOMPLETE .... 


22 
16 
19 


3 
3 
3 


TOTAL 


313 


5 


5 


7 


21 


70 



* In case of doubt as to the unhealthy appearance of an animal being due to tuberculosis, the owner is 
given the right to have it slaughtered, payment to be allowed only if tuberculosis is found present. 



-J P. D. 98 

(2) The tuberculin testing <>J cattle. 

Section 82, Chapter 129, General Laws, relative to the use of tuberculin 
and Chapter 358, Acts of 1922 the so-called "Request Test Law" were 
amended during this year by Chapter 335, Acts of 1927. 

The following tables arranged so as to compare with report of the pre- 
vious year are a record of the work accomplished in the testing of cattle 
at request of owner, — 

Increase Decrease 

Herds tasted 3,011 1 >7s 1,133 60% 

Cattle tested— purebred 17 7 18,807 3,931 28.5% 

Cattle tested— grade* 32,681 368 13 36.9% 

Total 50,429 37,675 12,754 33.8% 

Cattle reacted — purebred 646 987 342 34 6% 

Cattle reacted — grades 3,724 5,350 1,626 30.4% 

Total 4,369 6,337 1,968 31. % 

T^ir^t Test 

Herds 933 490 443 90.4% 

Cattle 8.815 6,814 2,001 29.3% 

Reacted 2,289 3,638 1,349 37. % 

Per cent reacted 25.9% 53.3% 

Second Test 

Herds 521 468 53 11.3% 

Cattle 5,185 5,693 508 8.9% 

Reacted 403 795 392 49 . 3% 

Per cent reacted 7.7% 13.9% 

Third Test or More 

Herds 1,116 636 480 75.4% 

Cattle 25,593 17,862 7,731 43.2% 

Reacted 1,600 1,779 179 10. % 

Per cent reacted 6.2% 9.9% 

Accredited 

Herds 441 284 157 55. % 

Cattle 10,836 7,306 3,530 48.3% 

Reacted 77 125 48 38. % 

Per cent reacted .7% 1.8% 

The following table is a recapitulation by counties: 





First Tests 


% 




Retests 


Total Tests 


Total % 










Reacted 














Reacted 




I 
Herds 


Head 


Re> 
acted 




Herds 


Head 


Re- 
acted 


Herds 


Head 


Re- 
acted 




Barnstable 


132 


377 


38 


10. 


239 


1,301 


34 


371 


1,678 


72 


4.2 


1926 


29 


198 


8 


4- 


213 


1,159 


60 


242 


1,357 


68 


5. 


Berkshire . . 


122 


1,479 


332 


22.4 


275 


6,155 


322 


397 


7,634 


654 


8.5 


1926 


66 


937 


151 


16.1 


141 


3,672 


185 


207 


4,609 


336 


7.5 


Bristol 


12 


161 


61 


37.8 


58 


1,843 


46 


70 


2,004 


107 


5.3 


1926 


8 


44 


17 


38.6 


48 


1,690 


132 


66 


1,734 


149 


8.5 


DUKES 


7 


46 


1 


2.1 


37 


298 


4 


44 


344 





1.4 


1926 


7 


90 


14 


15.5 


8 


14 


1 


10 


104 


/5 


i4.-4 




44 


472 


166 


35.1 


64 


2,528 


67 


108 


3,000 


233 


7.7 


1926 


4 


147 


8 


5.4 


50 


2,208 


104 


64 


2,355 


iis 


4.7 


Franklin . . . 


36 


476 


80 


16.8 


80 


2,541 


16 


116 


3,017 


96 


3.1 


1926 


10 


173 


3 


1.7 


57 


1,886 


118 


67 


2,059 


121 


5.5 


Hampden .... 


107 


892 


226 


25.3 


108 


1,664 


14 


215 


2,556 


240 


9.3 


1926 


82 


1,159 


928 


80.0 


68 


1,345 


49 


100 


2,504 


977 


39.0 


Hampshire . . 


224 


2,277 


290 


12.7 


100 


2,729 


78 


324 


5,006 


368 


7.3 


1926 


20 


869 


648 


63. 


67 


2,010 


97 


77 


2,879 


645 


£2. .4 


Middlesex. . . 


71 


978 


526 


53.7 


262 


5,188 


489 


333 


6,166 


1,015 


16.4 


1926 


85 


841 


521 


61.9 


188 


4,519 


680 


273 


6,360 


1,201 


£2.-4 


Nantucket . . 


1 


48 


2 


4.1 


7 


130 


3 


8 


178 


5 


2.8 


1926 





































79 


535 


307 


57.3 


259 


5,266 


424 


338 


5,801 


731 


12.6 


1926 


28 


216 


144 


66.6 


170 


3,630 


462 


198 


3,746 


606 


16.1 


Plymouth . . . 


46 


343 


61 


17.7 


271 


4,106 


258 


317 


4,449 


319 


7.1 


1926 


107 


681 


195 


28.6 


184 


2,627 


266 


291 


3,308 


461 


18.9 




1 


2 





0. 


13 


206 


79 


14 


208 


79 


37.9 


1926 











0. 


9 


101 


17 


9 


101 


17 


16.8 


Worcester . . 


51 


729 


199 


27.3 


305 


7,659 


246 


356 


8,388 


445 


5.3 


1926 


94 


1,459 


1,101 


75.4 


200 


6,100 


628 


294 


7,659 


1,629 


21.6 


1927 


933 


8,815 


2,289 


25.9 


2,078 


41,614 


2,080 


3,011 


50,429 


4,369 


8.6 


1926 


490 


6,814 


3,638 


53.3 


1,388 


30,861 


2,699 


1.878 


37,675 


6.337 


16.8 



P. D. 98 5 

UNDER TEST NOV. 30 ACCREDITED 

1927 1926 1927 1926 

Herds Head Herds Head Herds Head Herds Head 

BARNSTABLE 303 1,171 220 1,041 78 441 U 445 

BERKSHIRE 351 5,769 259 4,750 98 2,072 72 1,740 

BRISTOL 54 1,584 47 1,346 31 1,169 21 827 

DUKES 42 311 85 269 23 196 16 121 

ESSEX 84 1,870 48 1,658 23 704 21 405 

FRANKLIN 93 2,175 66 1,635 52 1,503 40 1,155 

HAMPDEN 179 1,988 100 1,467 47 785 42 783 

HAMPSHIRE 288 2,845 74 1,775 38 1,009 24 582 

MIDDLESEX 249 2,793 225 3,151 36 880 26 555 

NANTUCKET 10 219 9 162 1 13 2 24 

NORFOLK 241 2,713 214 2,876 38 428 34 488 

PLYMOUTH 280 1,972 278 2,648 62 994 82 542 

SUFFOLK 10 79 15 113 1 8 3 6 

WORCESTER 288 6,166 285 5,604 94 2,749 67 2,068 

TOTAL 2,472 31,655 1,875 28,495 622 12,951 444 9,736 

The above figures indicate 9.5 percent of the herds and 17 percent of 
the cattle population of the State under test as compared with 7 percent 
of the herds and 14.7 percent of the cattle population in the year 1926. 

The branding of reacting cattle with the letter "T" as required by De- 
partment Order No. 38 — effective September 30, 1926, has proven of 
great value in the identification of reacting cattle at time of slaughter 
and has undoubtedly removed the possibility of unscrupulous persons dis- 
posing of reacting cattle for purposes other than slaughter. 

Reacting cattle, for which owners are to be reimbursed, must be 
slaughtered in the presence of a representative of the division. During 
the year 5% of reactors slaughtered were reported as "No lesions" and 
5.4% as "tanked." This compares with 4.8% "no lesions" and 2% 
"tanked" in 1926. 

The average salvage received by owners of reacting cattle for this year 
was $34.96 as compared with $29.09 in 1926. 

In an endeavor to assist purchasers of cattle intended as replacements 
for cattle which have reacted, a section of the quarantine station in the 
stockyards at Brighton was established May 24th, from which cattle 
from clean herds tested under State and Federal supervision can be pur- 
chased. While this action has not met with the cooperation from the 
dealers in cattle that was looked for, it is believed that it is proving of 
real benefit to owners of tested herds. Certificates on cattle from this 
section are stamped with the word "Approved" and are accepted for ad- 
mission of said cattle to herds tested under the Request Test plan. 

During the year there were received at the quarantine station 3,530 
head of Massachusetts cattle intended for dairy purposes. Three thou- 
sand four hundred and seventeen were accepted on records of test made 
prior to shipment; 113 were held and submitted to test of which number 
18 or 16% reacted. These figures compare with the 1926 record of 3,811 
head accepted on test, 160 held for test, 38 or 24% reacting. 

(3) Supervision of the interstate movement of cattle into Massachu- 
setts. 

Cattle moved into Massachusetts regardless of age or for what pur- 
pose must in compliance with the law (Dept. Order No. 35) be accom- 
panied by a permit issued by the Director except and unless consigned 
to (A) the quarantine station at Brighton or Somerville (B) a slaughter- 
ing establishment where Federal inspection is maintained. 

Dairy cattle received at quarantine stations: 



6 
Released i 


on approved certificate of health 


Held a 


::, 


Canada 




7 


Connecticut 






Indiana 


2 1 


068 


Maine 


205 7 


3,201 


New Hampshire 


139 15 


216 


New York 


44 3 


1.697 


Vermont 


266 37 



P. D. 98 



reacted 



11.259 656 63 (or 9.6% reacted) 

Total receipts 11,915 head 

Compared with 11,231 received in 1926 on papers, 1,578 held and tested, 
121 or 7.8 c c reacted. 

There were 9,341 dairy cattle received at other points on permit from 
the following states: Canada, 345; Connecticut, 276; Illinois, 190; Indi- 
ana, 43; Iowa, 5; Kentucky, 30; Maine, 1,464; Maryland, 27; Michigan, 
1; Minnesota, 18; New Hampshire, 959; New Jersey, 63; New York, 630; 
Nevada, 3; Ohio, 108; Pennsylvania, 28; Rhode Island, 99; Texas, 1; 
Virginia, 6; Vermont, 3,502; Wisconsin, 543. Seventy-four (74) of this 
9,341 were tested after arrival, 12 reacting. In addition to the dairy 
cattle there were received on permits 4,494 beef cattle and 1,213 cattle for 
exhibition purposes. This compares with 8,110 dairy cattle, 2,301 beef 
cattle and 1,166 for exhibition purposes in 1926. 

Contagious Diseases of Swine 

The policy followed by the Division for the past few years in the con- 
trol of cholera and its allied diseases in swine has been adhered to the 
past year. The effectiveness of the methods employed regarding require- 
ment to report existence of cholera, quarantine of infected premises and 
supervision over the use of anti hog cholera serum and hog cholera virus 
is shown by general good health of swine on premises where immuniza- 
tion has been adopted. That this class of service is deemed by the swine 
owner to be of value is shown by the increased number of requests for 
treatment received. 

Allied with and following cholera, hemorrhagic septicemia often oc- 
curs — depending somewhat on virulence of the so-called cholera "break" 
as well as climatic conditions. 

By the following table it is noted that there was an increase of 17,626 
in the number of preventive cholera treatments and a decrease of 7,509 
in the number of hemorrhagic septicemia treatments required. 





1927 


1926 


Cholera treatments 


114,019 


96,393 


Hemorrhagic Septicemia 


25,324 


32,833 



Rabies 

Rabies is on the increase to an alarming extent as shown by the re- 
porting of 797 positive cases during 1927 as compared with 324 cases the 
previous year. Rabies is a preventable disease ; inasmuch as the infection 
is practically always transmitted by a bite and since the animal that does 
the biting is almost always a dog, all that is really necessary is to re- 
strain or muzzle all the dogs, and the disease would be under control in 
from 90 to 120 days. 

Why then does this terrible menace to human and animal life remain 
unchecked and out of control? The answer is apathy on the part of dog 
owners, and indifference on the part of those city and town officials 
charged with the duty of humanely destroying all unlicensed dogs. 

Our system of quarantine after contact, usually sufficient, is like lock- 
ing the barn door after the horse has been stolen when rabies is as preva- 
lent as at present in the area including and adjacent to the Metropolitan 



P. D. 98 7 

District. Restraint to prevent contact is the only safe way to save the 
dog and prevent the spread of infection. 

To this end the division has just sent out, November 30, 1927, a notice 
to the mayors of cities and the chairmen of selectmen of towns in seventy- 
one communities advising them of the alarming increase in the positive 
cases of rabies reported, and urging that all dogs be restrained from 
running at large for a period of 90 days beginning December 15, 1927. 
If ordinances are passed and properly enforced the control of the situa- 
tion is assured. If not, it will be additional proof of the need of a re- 
vision of our present dog laws giving more centralized control to a state 
official, possibly the Commissioner of the State Department of Public 
Health. In this connection it is of interest to note from the report of 
the Chief of the Cattle Bureau for the year ending November 30, 1907, 
when a serious outbreak of rabies occurred, the following: "The local 
authorities also have ample power in the event of an outbreak of rabies 
to require that all dogs shall be properly and securely muzzled or re- 
strained from running at large. The difficulty seems to be that in many 
communities the local authorities are lax in the enforcement of such or- 
ders, and while the laws are good they are rendered inoperative because 
of their non-enforcement." A brief detailed report follows: 



RABIES 

Showing Symptoms 



Contact 



Bite Cases 



3 « « .2 ~ 

9> > o S o 7° . > 8 u .2 •- S 

1 1 1 j |4| II I i i| ii : 

Forward, year 1926 34 5 30 

December 50 5 29 3 4 43 1 6 

1927 

January 61 10 40 6 7 51 6 

February 62 8 77 20 7 46 1 6 

March 73 13 2 149 28 8 106 1 7 

April 59 10 39 8 3 133 2 10 

May 58 8 2 65 12 7 125 3 9 

June 64 5 1 74 4 7 138 1 8 

July 50 4 1 134 4 27 171 1 13 

August 34 4 2 100 13 3 126 6 7 

September 33 10 1 5 7 29 44 99 1 7 

October 68 3 1 3 1 5 75 90 1 6 

November , 67 5 2 3 11 11 53 34 3 6 23 

1927 679 85 12 752 122 118 172 1,192 21 91 23 

1926 294 66 5 272 42 SO 45 915 16 93 SO 

TOTAL POSITIVE CASES, 797 

Above record occurred in following animals: 

Cats 9 1 1 19 21 1 3 13 8 

Cattle 4 2 6 1 7 12 

Dogs 665 80 11 574 98 67 130 1,179 21 80 23 

Donkeys 2 

Goats 2 

Horses 1 2 1 3 

Rats 1 

Sheep 2 

Skunk 1 

Squirrel 1 

Swine 150 38 27 

1,658 persons bitten (302 by rabid animals). 

Heads examined: 350 positive, 3 unsatisfactory, 2 suspicious, 149 negative. 

Miscellaneous Diseases 

Actinomycosis : A disease of cattle transmissible to man. This condi- 
tion in cattle usually occurs in the bones of the jaw. If given early at- 
tention it is amenable to treatment. During the year 3 cases were re- 
ported in 3 towns. 

Anthrax: Not a case of anthrax has been reported during the year 
and no requests were received for preventive anthrax treatment. 

Blackleg: No deaths from this disease have been reported this year. 



5, u • p - D - 98 

The causative agent oi this disease is found to infect premises in which 

the disease has previously occurred. The disease is found usually in cat- 
tle under two and one half to three years of age and is generally fatal. 
Preventive treatment it* given before infection occurs is nearly 100 per- 
cent effective, the acquired immunity protecting the animal for about one 
year. If preventive treatment is applied cattle may be pastured in in- 
fected pastures without danger of contracting the disease. During the 
year preventive treatment was given to 748 animals on 81 farms in 34 
towns. 

Glanders: One positive case of glanders was reported during the year, 
this case was revealed as a result of a mallein test, and post-mortem 
examination confirmed the diagnosis. Twenty-five horses were reported 
as showing symptoms indicating glanders, 24 of which proved not to be 
affected with that disease. Twenty samples of blood were taken from 
18 of the 25 animals reported, and 19 ophthalmic tests were applied to 16 
of the animals. Order No. 36 under which it is required that a permit' 
accompany all horses shipped into Massachusetts from New York, New 
Jersey, Rhode Island and Connecticut still remains in force. During the 
year 1,297 horses arrived from the states referred to on permit, only 1 
of which was held in quarantine for test, and the test proving negative 
this horse was later released. 

Infectious abortion: That this disease is widely distributed through- 
out the herds in this State is a recognized fact. Easily conveyed from 
herd to herd and highly contagious in character owners of valuable herds 
are becoming more and more interested in the development of some plan 
by which the further spread may be prevented and the disease itself erad- 
icated from herds already affected. Steps are under consideration for 
the establishment of an abortion-free accredited herd plan whereby all 
cattle reacting to laboratory tests for abortion must be removed from 
the herd and either kept under quarantine or slaughtered. The activities 
of this division are now limited to the examination of samples of blood 
submitted for that purpose. During the year 286 samples w T ere received, 
83 of which were diagnosed as positive. 

Mange: Mange in cattle was reported on 4 premises, 25 head were 
affected. These cattle were placed in quarantine and the owner advised 
as to treatment. All of the affected animals recovered and were released. 

Tuberculosis in swine: During the year 13 cases of this disease were 
reported, all of which were discovered at time of slaughter. Disinfection 
of the premises from which the swine originated was required and a 
physical examination made of the cattle maintained on said premises. 

Laboratory Service 
The laboratory of the State Department of Public Health has rendered 
valuable service in the examination of specimens submitted for that pur- 
pose. During the year the brains of 474 dogs, 17 cats, 6 cattle, 3 horses, 
1 pig, 1 rat, 1 squirrel and 1 skunk were examined for rabies. Twenty 
samples of blood for glanders; 286 samples of blood for infectious abor- 
tion. Seven specimens were examined for anthrax; 1 specimen for black- 
leg; 12 specimens for hemorrhagic septicemia; 3 specimens for tubercu- 
losis and 7 specimens for miscellaneous diseases. 

Annual Inspection of Farm Animals and Premises 
Under the provisions of Section 19, Chapter 129 of the General Laws, 
an order w r as issued by the Director on December 10, 1926, to every in- 
spector of animals in the cities and towns of the Commonwealth calling 
for an inspection of all cattle, sheep, and swine, and of the premises where 
kept. 

This order called for the completion of the inspection by February 15, 
and for a report of the same to be promptly forwarded to the Division's 
office. The inspectors' reports came forward in most instances in good 
season and were duly examined and tabulated in minute detail. 



P. D. 98 9 

These reports constitute a "census" of the cattle, sheep and swine on 
25,834 farms or premises in the State where these species of animals are 
kept. From these reports the following facts are gathered: — 

The number of cattle of all kinds has decreased from the 1926 record 
of 192,777 to 185,147— a decrease of 7,630 head, or 4%. 

The number of swine reported by local inspectors of animals this year 
was 80,280, an increase of 10,218 or 12V 2 %. 

The number of sheep reported was 10,747. 

Meetings of local town and city inspectors were called in April for con- 
ference with Division officials. 

These meetings were held in Greenfield, Pittsfield, Springfield, Worces- 
ter and Boston, and a fairly large number of inspectors attended. 



Financial Statement 

Appropriation for the salary of the Director, 
chapter 138 Acts of 1927 .... 
Expended during the year for the salary of 
the Director .... 
Appropriation for personal services of clerks and 
stenographers, chapter 138, Acts of 1927 . 
Expended during the year for personal serv- 
ices of clerks and stenographers . $10,537.00 
Unexpended balance ..... 153.00 



Appropriation for services, other than personal 
including printing the annual report, travel- 
ing expenses of the Director, and office sup- 
plies and equipment, chapter 138, Acts of 

1927 $4,300.00 

Transferred from Appropriation for Extraord- 
inary Expenses ..... 350.00 



Total amount appropriated 

Expended during the year for the following 
purposes : 

Books and maps 

Express and messenger service 

Postage 

Printing report 

Other printing 

Telephone and telegrams 

Stationery and office supplies 

Expenses of the Director 

Total expenditure 
Unexpended balance 



$52.12 
386.04 
935.20 
47.28 
972.86 
773.70 
670.11 
752.04 



$4,589.35 
60.65 



Appropriation for personal services of veterina- 
rians and agents engaged in the work of ex- 
termination of contagious diseases among 
domestic animals, chapter 138, Acts of 1927 $48,500.00 
Brought forward from 1926 Appropriation 5.00 

Transferred from Appropriation for Extraord- 
inary Expenses ..... 1,650.00 

Total amount appropriated 



$3,500.00 

3,500.00 

10,690.00 

$10,690.00 



$4,650.00 



$4,650.00 



$50,155.00 



10 

Expended during the year for the following 
purposes: 

Services of salaried agents .... 

Services of per diem agents 

Labor hired ...... 

Total expenditure ..... 
Unexpended balance 



P. D. 98 



$35,438.31 

14,184.50 

104.00 

$49,726.81 
428.19 



Appropriation for the traveling expenses of vet- 
erinarians and agents, chapter 138, Acts of 
1927 

Brought forward from 1926 Appropriation 

Total amount appropriated 

Expended during the year for the following 
purposes : 
Traveling expenses of regular agents 
Traveling expenses of per diem agents 

Total expenditure ..... 
Unexpended balance ..... 



Appropriation for reimbursement of owners of 
horses killed during the present and pre- 
vious years, travel, when allowed, of inspec- 
tors of animals, incidental expenses of kill- 
ing and burial, quarantine and emergency 
services and for laboratory and veterinary 
supplies and equipment, chapter 138, Acts 
of 1927 ..... 
Expended during the year for the following 
purposes : 

2 horses condemned and killed on account of 
glanders (1926) .... 

Supplies for veterinary inspectors . 

Laundry .... 

Antiseptics, biologies and disinfectants 

Thermometers, needles, syringes, etc. 

Ear-tags, punches, chains, etc. .... 

Expenses of killing and burial 

Expenses of Travel allowed inspectors of animals 

Quarantine expenses ..... 

Sundries ....... 

Total expenditure ..... 
Unexpended balance ..... 



Appropriation for reimbursement of owners of 
cattle killed as authorized by chapter 304, 
Acts of 1924, and chapter 129, General 
Laws, as amended by chapter 353, Acts of 
1922, during present and previous years, 
chapter 138, Acts of 1927 .... 

Brought forward from 1926 Appropriation 

Total amount appropriated 



$50,155.00 



$25,000.00 
26.86 



$13,856.41 
6,732.91 

$20,589.32 
4,437.54 



$185.00 
225.99 
393.42 
224.18 
445.31 
2,645.19 
118.91 
674.37 
772.05 
36.75 

$5,721.17 
278.83 



$165,000.00 
44,597.82 



$25,026.86 



$25,026.86 



6,000.00 



$6,000.00 



$209,597.82 



P. D. 98 11 

Expended during the year for the following: 

5,107 head of cattle killed in 1926 and 1927 

(chapter 353, Acts of 1922) . $135,116.96 

308 head of cattle killed (physical cases includ- 
ing no lesion cases) .... 7,828.43 



Total expenditure . . $142,945.39 

Unexpended balance ..... 66,652.43 



$209,597.82 

The average amount paid for condemned tuberculous cattle for the year 
was $24.23. 

The average amount paid for cattle slaughtered under the provisions 
of Chapter 353, Acts of 1922 and Chapter 335, Acts of 1927, was $46.13 
for registered purebred cattle and $22.92 for grade cattle. 

Forty-six claims for reimbursement for cattle condemned and killed as 
physical cases of tuberculosis during the year remain unsettled, these 
claims amounting to $1,150. 

One hundred and sixty-eight unpaid claims covering 661 cattle, to which 
provisions of Chapter 353, Acts of 1922 and Chapter 335, Acts of 1927, 
apply, remain unpaid, amounting to $17,842. 

There has been received during the year from the sale of hides and 
carcasses of condemned animals $22.80; for refund of amount paid for 
repairs on State-owned car injured in accident $19.97. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRANK B. CUMMINGS, Director. 



APPENDIX 

The following graphs show the work of the Division of Animal Indus- 
try in control of the principal contagious diseases of animals for a period 
of years. 



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Public Document No. 98 



ttty? (£nmunmuii>aUJj of MasmttymtttB 
ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



DIRECTOR OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY 



FOR THE 



Year ending November 30, 1928 




Publication of this Document approved by the Commission on Administration and Finance 
900— 6-'29. No. 5876 



<£ost5^ 

PUBLIC 



Hie Commontoealtb of f+lassacljusetts 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION 



Division of Animal Industry 
Boston, November 30, 1928 
To the Commissioner of Conservation: 

The report of the work of this Division for the* year ending November .SO, 1928, 
is respectfully submitted. Mr. Frank B. Cummings resigned as Director to take 
effect on June 1, 1928. He was appointed to this office on November 0, 1926, 
and though serving in this capacity a short period of about nineteen months he 
made a record of efficiency, and by his outstanding work has made possible a revival 
of interest all over the State in the tuberculin test. 

( hi June first, 1928, Evan F. Richardson of Millis was appointed by the Gov- 
ernor and Council to succeed Mr. Frank B. Cummings as Director of the Division 
of Animal Industry. 

Bovine Tuberculosis 

The work in connection with the eradication of tuberculosis in cattle is the most 
important activity of this Division. The natural increase in tuberculin testing 
which might have been expected did not wholly materialize, as many of the cattle 
owners who decided to come under State and Federal supervision have delayed 
applying for tests in order to take advantage of the increased indemnity which 
will go into effect on December 1st, 1928. A large number of requests are now on 
file, and indications are that we shall make a great stride forward this coming 
year. 

The so-called Area Test Bill (Chapter 335, Acts of 1927), approved April 27, 
1927, gives authority as follows: 

"Section 33-B. Whenever not less than eighty-five per centum of the cattle 
permanently kept in a town are, upon application of their owners, being tested 
for bovine tuberculosis under the supervision of the director, the director may 
apply the same test to all other cattle in such town." 

The power thus invested in the Director has never been invoked because it was 
felt that this procedure would work an injustice to the cattle owners until such 
time as a larger indemnity (comparable to that allowed by other states) had 
been provided. 

The majority of the states of the Union exercise quarantine authority, but this 
authority has not thus far been granted this Division. Efficient progress in a 
clean-up program for tuberculosis eradication as applied to towns, districts, or 
counties, is, how r ever, greatly retarded without it, and I am therefore recommend- 
ing to the incoming legislature quarantine authority in connection with this work. 

For convenience the record of the work on tuberculosis eradication is divided 
into three classes. 

(1) The examination of cattle reported as showing physical symptoms of disease. 

The work of the department in connection with this classification is authorized 
under Chapter 129 Section 29 (requiring report of the existence of contagious 
disease in domestic animals), Section 11 (examination and condemnation of ani- 
mals found to be affected with tuberculosis), and Section 12-A (payment for cattle 
condemned). 

The following tabulation shows disposition made of 302 head of cattle quaran- 
tined or reported under this section of the work: 



P. I). 98 3 

Condemned *Permit to Kill Died Released Forward 

No No 

Lesions Lesions Lesions Lesions 
found found found found 

FORWARD FROM 

YEAR 1927 4 1 

1927 

DECEMBER 10 3 9 

1928 

JANUARY 36 3 1 1 13 

FEBRUARY 26 1 2 1 11 

MARCH 17 1 6 

APRIL 15 1 2 2 5 

MAY 8 2 1 1 6 

JUNE 13 1 3 9 

JULY 12 1 4 5 

AUGUST 7 2 

SEPTEMBER 13 4 

OCTOBER 8 1 1 2 4 

NOVEMBER 18 2 1 

INCOMPLETE ' 2 

TOTAL 187 8 7 3 20 75 2 

* In ease of doubt as to the unhealthy appearance of an animal being due to tuberculosis, the owner is 
given the right to have it slaughtered, payment to be allowed only if tuberculosis is found present. 

(2) The tuberculin testinn of cattle. 

Section 32, Chapter 129, General Laws, relative to the use of tuberculin and 
Chapter 353, Acts of 1922 the so-called "Request Test Law," were amended by 
Chapter 335, Acts of 1927. 

The following tables are a record of the work accomplished in the testing of 
cattle at request of* owner: 



P. D. 98 



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An 



COUNTY STATISTICS 

Cattm ( !] \-i | I MM a 



UvriU Head Herds % Head <; 



( >M < II \N 

Test 
Herds Bead 



2 < II \N 

I UTS 
Herds Head 



Barnstable 894 

Berkshire 2,101 

Bristol 2.623 

Dukes His 

1,556 

Franklin 2,090 

Hampden 1,892 

Hampshire 2,005 

Middlesex 2 

Nantucket 12 

Norfolk 1,406 

Plymouth 2,064 

Suffolk 59 

Worcester 5,198 



2,060 
19,812 
19,426 

772 
13,528 
16,742 
12,299 
15,578 
22,593 

;>:.»;» 
9,108 
9,710 

■JOS 

42,563 



628 

f»17 

57 

46 
1 23 

99 
197 

262 

7 
235 
289 

12 20 

293 r> 



90 



I 

to 
u 

9 
18 

n; 
U 



1,957 96 

7,868 89 

1,720 8 

■ :ii U 

2,139 t6 

2,418 / j 

2,309 18 
1,256 

3,837 ffl 

203 
3,21 i 

2. 964 80 

92 I ' 

6,446 J5 



808 
230 

B 
18 
47 
17 
43 
85 
71 

5 
63 
i.i 

8 

01 



606 

2,653 

L89 

loo 

017 
265 
550 

1,127 

1,128 
181 

1,107 

507 

53 

1,283 



112 

33 

i 

1 

13 

10 

26 
32 

:,D 
l 

48 

is 
2 

31 



17f. 
L63 

24 

7 

131 

89 

07 

219 

|S| 

a 

157 

165 

25 

114 



r. i). 98 



Accredited 

Herds Head 

145 685 
100 2,864 

32 1,()70 

203 

881 

1,899 

1 ,033 



25 
83 

07 
111 



145 2,270 

91 1,309 

l 19 

86 896 

lis 1,424 

8 9 

KM) 3,727 



Total 24,734185,124 3,048 If 39,766 ff 1,02410,372 414 1,823 1,18318,895 



The above figures indicate: 

1927 

An increase of 576 herds under test 2,472 

An increase of S.lll cattle under test 31,655 

An increase of 632 herds no reactors last test 1,989 

An increase of 6,133 cattle no reactors last test 24,957 

An increase of 561 herds accredited 622 

An increase of 5,944 cattle accredited 12,951 



1928 
3,048 

39,700 
2,021 

31,090 
1,183 

18,895 



The table below shows statistics on testing as a result of a drive put on by 
Health Officials in Barnstable County in November. 

BARNSTABLE COUNTY STATISTICS 



Towns 
Bourne 


Cattle ' 
Herds 
148 
. : . . . 39 


CEN8U8 

Head 

431 
98 
87 
70 

124 
69 

496 

112 

6 

77 

28 

190 

101 
64 

107 


Under 
Herds 

122 
26 
25 
29 
54 
34 

163 
16 
5 
26 
8 
45 
33 

42 


Test 
Head 

378 
83 
60 
70 

122 
72 

537 

62 

4 

85 

39 

225 

105 

115 


1 Clean Test 
Herds Head 

43 67 

12 48 
7 9 

15 28 
15 23 

13 24 
143 232 

9 9 
2 2 

5 6 
1 11 

25 86 

6 23 

12 38 


2 Clean Tests 
Herds Head 

27 48 

7 10 

8 13 
4 4 

16 18 
10 13 

1 6 

2 2 
10 11 

2 6 

4 4 
12 15 

9 25 


Accredited 
Herds Head 

39 148 
4 20 


Chatham 


46 
28 


10 38 
6 19 


Dennis 


57 


16 56 


Eastham 


33 


11 35 


Falmouth 

Harwich 

Mashpee 

Orleans 


123 

34 

5 

31 


3 87 
11 68 


Provincetown 

Truro 


9 

49 

34 


5 22 

13 98 

14 57 


Wellfieet 

Yarmouth , 


22 
36 


13 37 



Total 



694 2,060 628 1,957 



308 



606 



112 



175 



145 



685 



The average salvage received by owners of reacting cattle for this vear was 
$45.17 as compared with $34.96 in 1927. 

The Brighton Market handles from two to three hundred milking cows weekly, 
and for that reason it has been given considerable attention in order that the 
purchasers of dairy cows in this market may be assured of obtaining the kind of 
cows they require. A white certificate is given on cattle from accredited herds, 
modified accredited areas, and clean herds under supervision, which entitles them 
to enter herds tested under State supervision. A pink certificate is given on cattle 
not included in these classifications, and these cattle should not be added to tested 
herds. 

On recommendation of this Division, the Governor and Council approved an 
order dated October 2, 1928, which reads as follows: 



Order No. 40 

Boston, October 2, 1928. 

ORDER (REGULATION) RELATIVE TO CARS, TRUCKS OR VEHI- 
CLES IN WHICH REACTING CATTLE HAVE BEEN SHIPPED 

OR TRANSPORTED. 

Section I. Cattle which have reacted to a tuberculin test shall not be shipped, 
transported or moved within the Commonwealth in cars, trucks or vehicles of any 
kind containing healthy cattle unless all the animals are for immediate slaughter, 
or unless the reacting cattle are separated from the other animals by a wooden 
partition which shall be securely affixed to the walls of the car, truck or vehicle. 



P. D. 98 7 

Section II. All cars, trucks, or other vehicles in which reacting cattle have been 
shipped, transported or moved, and which are within the Commonwealth when 
unloaded shall before being used again be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected by 
removing all litter and manure from all portions of such car, truck or vehicle and 
saturating the entire interior surface thereof with an approved disinfectant. 

This Order shall be published by posting a copy of same in a conspicuous place 
at the public stock yards at Boston and the quarantine stations at Boston and 
Somerville, and by the Inspectors of Animals in each city and town in the Com- 
monwealth by filing a copy hereof with the City Clerk or Town Clerk as the case 
may be and by posting a copy hereof in a conspicuous public place within the city 
or town for which he is the Inspector of Animals. 

Evan F. Richardson, 
Director of Animal Industry. 
Approved : 

W. A. L. Bazeley, 

Commissioner of Conservation. 
Approved in Council: October 17, 1928. 

William L. Reed, 
Executive Secretary. 

Since this order was put into effect all trucks taking reactors to the Brighton 
Stock Yards have been thoroughly cleansed and disinfected before leaving the 
yards. This method is employed as a safeguard to prevent if possible the spread 
of bovine tuberculosis to dairy cows taken out of this market. 

During the year -there were received at the quarantine station 2,716 head of 
Massachusetts cattle intended for dairy purposes. Two thousand six hundred 
eighty -four (2,684) were accepted on records of test made prior to shipment; 
32 were held and submitted to test of which number 16, or 50%, reacted. 

(3) Supervision of the Interstate movement of cattle into Massachusetts. 

Following is a record of cattle received at the Quarantine Station at Brighton: 

Held and Tested 

36 1 reacted 
16 
4 

44 6 reacted 

12,471 100 7 (or 7% reacted) 

Total receipts, 12,571 head 
Compared with 11,259 received in 1927 on papers, 656 held and tested, 63 or 9.6% 
Teacted. 

There were 12,143 dairy cattle received at other points on permit from the follow- 
ing states: Canada, 894; Connecticut, 443; Delaware, 1; Illinois, 16; Indiana, 
22; Iowa, 17; Maine, 1,834; Maryland, 20; Michigan, 124; Minnesota, 125; 
New Hampshire, 1,930; New Jersey, 73; New York, 949; Ohio, 4; Pennsylvania, 
14; Rhode Island, 216; South Carolina, 3; Virginia, 18; Vermont, 4,837; West 
Virginia, 1; Wisconsin, 602. One hundred forty-three (143) of this 12,143 were 
tested after arrival, 5 reacting. In addition to the dairy cattle there were received 
on permits 4,558 beef cattle and 1,334 cattle for exhibition purposes. This com- 
pares with 9,341 dairy cattle, 4,494 beef cattle and 1,213 cattle for exhibition 
purposes in 1927. 

Contagious Diseases of Swine 

The value of the immunization and treatment of swine in prevention of hog 
cholera and its allied diseases is indicated by the continued demand for this class of 
work. 

This service is furnished without cost to swine owners — said owners, however, 
are required to pay for such biologies as are used. This material is billed direct 
to the owner by the manufacturer. 

During the year 113,321 treatments were applied for hog cholera, and 33,442 
treatments for hemorrhagic septicemia. 



d on approved certificate of health 


66 


Canada 


6,863 


Maine 


2,901 


New Hampshire 


413 


New York 


1 


Rhode Island 


2,227 


Vermont 



8 P, D. 98 

Rabies 
Rabies in animals, which has Increased from 8£4 positive cases in 1926 to 797 

in l!>\!7, still continues on it> mad career, and we have had 862 eases in 1928. Two 

thousand one hundred eighty-five (2,185) dogs were reported to have hit ten persons 

during this la^t year. 

The recommendations dated November SO, Uk'7. referred to in the report of thai 

>car relative to the issuing of orders restraining all dogs for a period of ninety days 
in the seventy cities and towns in the Metropolitan district did not meet with the 
co-operation hoped for. The Selectmen of towns and Mayors of cities were sent 
the following communication in July, and 1 believe if they would exercise the au- 
thority they have been given by the statutes, the stray and un-owned dog, which 
is almost always responsible for this dangerous malady, would practically disappear. 

July 11, UHH. 
To Mayors of Cities and Chairmen of Selectmen of Towns: 
Dear Sir: — 

May I call your attention to the enclosed copy of statutes taken from the Gen- 
eral Laws and ask your co-operation in the enforcement of same. I trust that you 
will pardon this suggestion of mine, coming as it does from one who has been in 
office only a few weeks, but who has since taking office been deeply concerned 
over the many and continuous reports of dog bites numbering 282 from June 1st 
Xo July 1st. Of course, upon investigation it is found that a very small percentage 
of this number are bites from dogs affected with rabies. How T ever, owing to the 
injury sustained by a dog bite even if not from a rabid dog, and the fact that so 
many children and women having been once bitten by a dog are usually afraid of 
them thereafter, I feel that the public should be protected from the dog which is 
not licensed and the dog which is not properly cared for by the owner. 

In view of these facts I am asking that particular stress be laid on these statutes 
in the hope that we may be able to co-operate with each other for the safety of the 
public. 

Very truly yours, 

Evan F. Richardson, 

Director. 

One dog affected with rabies this last year bit ten persons. Persons so bitten 
are exposed to a dread disease which may, unless they are given the Pasteur treat- 
ment, result in a horrible death. 

Dynamite is handled with care and caution, and if the stray dog received the 
same attention, rabies would practically be eliminated. 

Following is a report in detail for the year: 













RABIES 




















Showing 


Symptoms 




Contact 






Bite 


CA8E8 














<D 




V, o 


> 






o 




















V _ 


49 


















> 


> 


a 

'•3 


B0 


d or di 
symp 
rabies 


go 
C 

a 
■t) 


— . a 

cc~ 

o a 


as 


V, 5 


> 

7, M 


o a 








'S3 


t£ 


(0 

9 

3 


J. 

"3 


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— 


a « 
do a 


"3 


■a w 


= C 


a ^ 


CO 
O 






Pi 


£ 


& 


H-l 


A 


A 


Q 


rt 


£ 


■A 


5 


H 


Forward, year 1927 . . 


1 






165 


7 






23 








196 


December, 


1927 


94 


5 


4 


51 


9 


19 




75 


1 


6 




264 


Januarv, 1928 


85 


2 


1 


64 


10 


1 




71 


1 


7 




242 


February 




108 


7 


1 


55 


26 


9 




98 


3 


6 




313 






131 


9 


4 


82 


15 


4 




171 


3 


13 




432 


April . 




57 

63 


6 

7 


1 
2 


66 

87 


5 

6 


7 
4 




157 
185 


3 



12 
10 




314 


May ... . 




364 






63 


5 


8 


20 


4 


5 




228 


3 


10 




346 


July 




52 


2 


5 


35 


8 







158 


1 


5 




266 






44 


2 


3 


12 


2 


2 




206 


6 


16 




293 


September 




30 





2 


17 


2 







158 


2 


10 




221 






41 


3 


2 


1 


2 







332 


3 


3 




387 


November 




42 


2 


5 





1 






87 


2 


11 




150 


Forward . 




811 


50 


38 


655 


97 


51 


73 
73 


1,949 


28 


109 


117 
117 


190 


Total 


3,978 


1927 




679 


85 


12 


752 


122 


118 


172 


1,192 


21 


91 


23 


3,267 



Total positive cases, 862 



P. D. 98 9 

This record refers to the following animals: 

Cats 10 3 6 4 10 1 39 

Cattle 4 1 47 4 3 59 

Dogs 760 47 37 587 70 46 73 1,938 27 103 117 3,805 

Goats 1 1 

Horses 1 2 1 4 

Monkeys 1 1 

Squirrels 1 1 

Swine *. . . 36 12 19 1 68 

2,498 persons bitten (240 by rabid animals) 

549 heads examined: 375 positive, 13 unsatisfactory, 3 suspicious, 158 negative. 

Miscellaneous Diseases 

Actinomycosis: Nine head of cattle were reported for this condition. On exam- 
ination 4 proved to have the disease and 5 were released. 

Anthrax: This disease has not been reported this year. 

Blackleg: Two deaths were reported in cattle. As in previous years, preven- 
tive treatment is applied by agents of the division on request of cattle owners. 
This service is provided without cost. During the year the treatment was applied 
to 885 animals on 99 farms in 39 towns. 

Glanders: Forty -five horses were examined. Nine horses were found to be 
affected with glanders and were condemned and killed. Thirtj^-six proved nega- 
tive to tests and were released. Six of the nine positive cases, although found in 
three different localities, were all traced to one stable. Forty-three samples of 
blood were taken for laboratory examination. Twenty-three ophthalmic tests 
were applied. On October 17, the order requiring permits to accompany horses 
from New York, New Jersey, Rhode Island and Connecticut was rescinded. This 
Division has never required permits from other states. Prior to that date, 1,100 
horses arrived on permit. 

Infectious Abortion: Blood submitted for examination for this disease is exam- 
ined without cost to owners of cattle. Eight hundred thirty-four (834) bloods 
were examined, 267 of which indicated presence of infectious abortion. 

Mange: This disease was reported on three premises. Ten animals were affected. 
Advice regarding treatment was given and all cattle recovered and were released. 

Tuberculosis in Swine: Seventeen hogs found affected with tuberculosis at time 
of slaughter were reported and owners were advised regarding disinfection of 
premises. 

Annual Inspection of Farm Animals and Premises 
The usual order for inspection of all cattle, sheep and swine and of premises 
where kept was issued December 10, 1927, calling for completion of the inspection 
on or before February 15, 1928. 

From the reports received from the Inspectors of Animals of all cities and towns 
in the Commonwealth, there were inspected on 24,734 premises: 185,124 head of 
cattle, 9,692 sheep, 86,563 swine. 

Meetings of Inspectors of Animals were held during the year at Boston, Green- 
field, Hyannis, Pittsfield, Springfield, and Worcester. These meetings were well 
attended and it is believed resulted in improvement in the service rendered by the 
Inspectors. 

Financial Statement 
Appropriation for the salary of the Director, chapter 

127 Acts of 1928 $3,500.00 

Expended during the year for the salary of the Di- 
rector 3,500.00 

Appropriation for personal services of clerks and sten- 
ographers, chapter 127, Acts of 1928 . . $11,800.00 
Transferred from Appropriation for Extraordinary 

Expenses . 160.00 



Total amount appropriated $11,960.00 



10 

Expended during the year for personal services of 
clerks and stenographers ...... 

I nexpended balance ....... 



Appropriation i»>r services, other than personal, in- 
cluding printing tin* annual report, traveling ex- 
penses of the Director, and office supplies and 
equipment, chapter 127. Ads of 1928 

Expended during the year Tor the Following purposes : 
Books ami maps 
Express and messenger service 
Postage ..... 
Printing report .... 
Other printing .... 
Telephone and telegrams 
Stationery and office supplies . 
Expenses of the Director 



P.D. 98 



Total expenditure 
Unexpended balance 



Appropriation for personal services of veterinarians 
and agents engaged in the work of extermination 
of contagious diseases among domestic animals, 
chapter 127. Acts of 1928 . ... 

Brought forward from 1927 Appropriation . 

Total amount appropriated 

Expended during the year for the following purposes: 

Services of salaried agents 

Services of per diem agents 

Labor hired 

Total expenditure 

Unexpended balance 



Appropriation for the traveling expenses of veterina- 
rians and agents, including the cost of any motor 
vehicles purchased for their use, chapter 127, 
Acts of 1928 

Brought forward from 1927 Appropriation . 

Total amount appropriated 

Expended during the year for the following purposes: 
Traveling expenses of regular agents .... 
Traveling expenses of per diem agents .... 

Total expenditure 

Unexpended balance 



Appropriation for reimbursement of owners of horses 
killed during the present and previous years, 
travel, when allowed, of inspectors of animals, 
incidental expenses of killing and burial, quaran- 
tine and emergency services and for laboratory 
and veterinarv supplies and equipment, chapter 
127, Acts of 1928 



$11,958.08 
1 .92 



$64.50 
U0.27 
991.80 
$.72 
706.27 
676.92 
1,252.31 
880.64 



$4,991.48 

8.57 



$50,400.00 
10.00 



$35,546.50 
12,461.50 

104.00 

$48,112.00 
2.298.00 



$21,000.00 
17.72 



$14,337.60 
5,985.11 

$20,322.71 
695.01 



$11,960.00 



$5,000.00 



$5,000. 00 



$50,410.00 



$50,410.00 



$21,017.72 



$21,017.72 



$6,000.00 



P. D. 98 

Expended during the year for the following purposes 
6 horses condemned and killed on account of glanders 
Supplies for veterinary inspectors . . 

Laundry 

Antiseptics, biologies and disinfectants 

Thermometers, needles, syringes, etc. . 

Ear-tags, punches, chains, etc. 

Expenses of killing and burial 

Expenses of travel allowed inspectors of animals 

Quarantine expenses 

Sundries 



11 



Total expenditure 
Unexpended balance 



$300.00 
347.62 
385.10 
203.75 
508.45 

1,989.28 

96.00 

741.37 

1,233.25 
5.00 



$5,809.82 
190.18 



Appropriation for reimbursement of owners of tuber- 
cular cattle killed, as authorized by section twelve 
A of chapter 129 of the General Laws, inserted by 
section 1 of chapter 304 of the Acts of 1924, and in 
accordance with certain provisions of law and 
agreements made under authority of section 33 
of chapter 129 of the General Laws, as amended, 
during the present and previous years, chapter 
127, Acts, of 1928 ....... 

Brought forward from 1927 appropriation . 

Total amount appropriated 

Expended during the year for the following : 
3,674 head of cattle killed (Chapter 129, General Laws 

as amended) 

185 head of cattle killed (physical cases, including no 

lesion cases) 



Total expenditure 
Unexpended balance 



$100,000.00 
66,652.43 



$99,439.45 

4,759.54 

$104,198.99 
62,453.44 



$6,000.00 



$166,652.43 



$166,652.43 



The average amount paid for cattle slaughtered under the provisions of Chapter 
353, Acts of 1922 and Chapter 335, Acts of 1927, was $43.84 for registered purebred 
cattle and $23.47 for grade cattle. 

Sixteen claims for reimbursement for cattle condemned and killed as physical 
cases of tuberculosis during the year remain unsettled, these claims amounting 
to $400. 

One hundred seventy-seven (177) unpaid claims covering 497 cattle, to which 
provisions of Chapter 353, Acts of 1922 and Chapter 335, Acts of 1927, apply, 
remain unpaid, amounting to $21,039.29. 

There has been received during the year for dog fees in accordance with Chapter 
347, Acts of 1928, $67; for refund of amount paid for repairs on State-owned car 
injured in accident $26.95; for refund received on account of expenses of 1927, 
$16.05. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Evan F. Richardson, Director. 



Public Document 



No. 98 



Slip (Eammotmiralttj of ffimmttymtttB 



ANNUAL REPORT 



6^7. 3/ 



OF THE 



DIRECTOR OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY 



FOR THE 



Year ending November 30, 1929 

J 




Publication op this Document approved by the Commission on Administration and Finance 
800— 4-'30. No. 8596 



PUBLIC 



iThe Commontoealtf) of tflassacfcusetts 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION 

Division of Animal Industry 
Boston, November 30, 1929. 

To the Commissioner of Cons elevation: 

The report of the work of this Division for the year ending November 
30, 1929, is respectfully submitted. 

BOVINE TUBERCULOSIS 

Eradication of bovine tuberculosis in cattle is the most important ac- 
tivity of this Division. Work commenced with a rush last December as 
the result of two drives put on by the Health Unit of Barnstable County 
and the Hood Milk Company of Boston in Franklin County, and since 
that time the applications for tests have been coming in to this office in 
an increasing number from all over the State. 

The total number of tests in 1928 was 54,651, and in 1929, 92,773. 
The cattle under supervision have increased by 18,279, making a total 
at the end of this year of 58,045 under test. 

Barnstable County was declared a modified accredited area on June 
13, 1929, and as the Legislature of this year gave special quarantine 
authority applying to that County, such authority was exercised under 
rules and regulations approved by the Governor and Council, and these 
rules and regulations were put into effect on October 23, 1929. 

We have at the end of this year twenty-seven towns that are over 85% 
under supervision and are eligible for action in accordance with the fol- 
lowing section: 

"Section 33B. Whenever not less than eighty-five per centum of the 
cattle permanently kept in a town are, upon application of their owners, 
being tested for bovine tuberculosis under the supervision of the director, 
the director may apply the same test to all other cattle in such town." 

Requests from the Boards of Health of several of these towns have 
been made for the operation of this law, and some towns have already 
been cleaned up under its supervision. 

For convenience the record of the work on tuberculosis eradication is 
divided into three classes: 

(1) The Examination of Cattle Reported as Showing Physical 
Symptoms of Disease. 

The work of the department in connection with this classification is 
authorized under Chapter 129, Section 29 (requiring report of the exist- 
ence of contagious disease in domestic animals), Section 11 (examina- 
tion and condemnation of animals found to be affected with tuberculosis), 
and Section 12-A (payment for cattle condemned). 

During the year there has been reported 307 head of cattle included in 
this classification. Of this number 211 were examined physically, con- 
demned and killed, 198 proving to be affected with tuberculosis and 13 
showing no lesions of that disease. On 7 animals a so-called "permit to 



Mass. Secretary of trie Commonwealth 



P. D. 98 3 

kill" was granted as there was a doubt on physical examination as to 
whether the condition of the animal was due to tuberculosis or not. Five 
of these 7 animals proved to have tuberculosis and 2 proved to be affected 
with some other condition. Twenty-one animals reported, died prior to 
being examined. Sixty-four animals were released as physical examina- 
tion did not indicate tuberculosis. In the case of 4 animals no 
disposition was made, and these four cases have been carried forward 
for action next year. 

(2) The Tuberculin Testing of Cattle. 

Section 32, Chapter 129, General Laws, relative to the use of tuberculin 
and Chapter 353, Acts of 1922 the so-called "Request Test Law," were 
amended by Chapter 335, Acts of 1927 and Chapter 332, Acts of 1928. 

The following tables are a record of the work accomplished in the test- 
ing of cattle at request of owner : 



P. D. 98 



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COUNTY STATISTICS 



Cattle 

( I NSUI 



Herds Bead Herds 



Under Test 

ii, -.,1 <■; 



One Clean 
Test 



Two Clean 
Tests 



Herds Iliad Herds Head 



P. D. 98 



Accredited 
Herds Head 



Barnstable 


666 


2,064 


689 


100 


2,218 


100 


01 


98 


171 


1,181 


1 15 


648 


Berkshire 


2,030 


20,841 


861 


.;.' 


1 1 ,224 


6A 


362 


3,01s 


166 


2,2 12 


247 


4,209 


Bristol 


2,491 


19,701 


68 


2 


1,991 


10 


to 


1M 


11 


ISC 


29 


1,154 


Dukes 


163 


'.U7 


68 




123 


46 


12 


35 


". 


1 1 


38 


331 


Essex 


1,689 


13,979 


260 


it; 


3,323 


23 


121 


1,316 


40 


471 


51 


1,139 


Franklin . 


1,987 


17,967 


679 




9,311 


52 


634 


0,090 


21 


325 


78 


2,196 


Hampden 


1 ,926 


12,873 


306 


16 


3,328 


25 


103 


S23 


88 


291 


134 


1,952 


Hampshire 


1 ,936 


16,891 


432 


> 1 


6,439 


32 


1 64 


1,027 


44 


471 


200 


3,251 


Middlesex 


2,761 


22,12:5 


378 


IS 


4,912 


21 


119 


1,467 


68 


895 


109 


1,674 


Nantucket 


46 


542 


10 


22 


211 


38 


3 


6 






7 


205 


Norfolk 


1,316 


9,183 


302 


23 


3,730 


40 


100 


1,296 


65 


746 


101 


1,153 


Plymouth 


1,962 


10,147 


327 


te 


3,331 


ss 


106 


894 


63 


372 


137 


1,718 


Suffolk 


16 


293 


10 


22 


04 


21 






4 


8 


4 


13 


Worcester 


5,126 


45,595 


468 


9 


8,545 


19 


139 


1,892 


63 


1,175 


176 


4,286 



Total . 24,011 193,206 4,848 21 58,045 SO 1,817 18.145 1,051 8,357 1,451 23,959 

The above figures indicate: 

1928 1929 

An increase of 1,800 herds under test 3,048 4,848 

An increase of 18,279 cattle under test 39,766 58,045 

An increase of 1,698 herds no reactors last test 2,621 4,319 

An increase of 19,371 cattle no reactors last test 31,090 50,461 

An increase of 268 herds accredited 1,183 1,451 

An increase of 5,064 cattle accredited 18,895 23,959 

The average salvage received by owners of reacting cattle for this year 
was $43.08 as compared with $45.17 in 1928. 

The Brighton Market handles about 15,000 dairy cows yearly and is by 
far the largest distributing point for replacements of any sales place in 
New England. The issuance of either a white or a pink certificate on 
each dairy cow leaving this market has been very helpful, as by that 
means the purchaser may know the status of the cattle he is buying. 
The ratio of the "pink slip" cows to "white slip" cows changed from the 
first of the year when 70% of the dairy cows were "pink slip" cows and 
30% "white slip" cows; to 30% "pink slip" cows and 70% "white slip" 
cows during the latter part of the year. This change in the proportion 
of "white slip" cows or those from accredited herds, modified accredited 
areas, clean herds under supervision or cattle which have passed two 
recent clean tests sixty to ninety days apart over "pink slip" cows, which 
are not included in these classifications, is a true indication of the 
growth of interest in the tuberculin test. When cattle arrive at the barn 
Tuesday mornings for sale, these two classes of cows are kept separate. 

Inoculation for the prevention of Brighton or Shipping Fever, so-called, 
is upon the arrival of the cattle at the Market given practically at cost 
to cattle whose owners desire same. This service is much appreciated by 
the Brighton dealers, and, we believe, prevents many fatalities from that 
disease. 

During the year there were 482 trucks which delivered 1,872 reactor 
cattle at the Quarantine Station, and these trucks were cleaned and dis- 
infected before leaving the yard. This was done in accordance with the 
requirements of rules and regulations which were adopted in the fall of 
1928. The Brighton Stock Yards Company on April 1, 1929, put in opera- 
tion a regulation that all trucks before taking dairy cows from the 
Brighton Market must be cleaned and disinfected. During the period 
from April 1 to December 1 there were 1809 trucks so cleaned and 
disinfected. 

All these improvements in the method of handling cattle at the Brigh- 
ton Market have been very helpful in raising the standard of that Mar- 
ket as a suitable place to buy dairy cows. 



P. D. 98 7 

During the year there were received at the quarantine station 2,027 
head of Massachusetts cattle intended for dairy purposes. Two thous- 
and one (2001) were accepted on records of test made prior to shipment; 
26 were held and submitted to test of which number 5 reacted. 

(3) Supervision of the Interstate Movement op Cattle Into 
Massachusetts. 

Following is a record of cattle received at the Quarantine Station at 
Brighton : 



Released on approved certificate of health 


Held and Tested 


6,246 Maine 


2 


2,812 New Hampshire 


12 


1,940 Vermont 


13 


449 New York 


5 


43 Wisconsin 





12 Rhode Island 


3 2 reacted 


128 Canada 


2 



11,630 37 2 

Total receipts 11,667 head 

Compared with 12,471 received in 1928 on papers, 100 held and tested, 
7 or 7% reacted. 

There were 14,829 dairy cattle received at other points on permit from 
the following states: Canada, 1,135; Connecticut, 766; Illinois, 50; In- 
diana, 61; Iowa, 121; Kansas, 42; Maine, 2,161; Maryland, 1; Michigan, 
19 ; Minnesota, 69 ; Missouri, 57 ; New Hampshire, 1,633 ; New Jersey, 65 ; 
New York, 1,139; Ohio, 131; Oklahoma, 56; Pennsylvania, 11; Rhode Is- 
land, 176; Tennessee, 58; Texas, 37; Vermont, 5,964; Virginia, 1; Wis- 
consin, 1,076. Two hundred sixty-five (265) of this 14,829 were tested 
after arrival, 30 reacting. In addition to the dairy cattle there were re- 
ceived on permits 5,188 beef cattle, and 1,384 cattle for exhibition pur- 
poses. This compares with 12,143 dairy cattle, 4,558 beef cattle and 
1,334 cattle for exhibition purposes in 1928. 

RECEIPTS OF LIVESTOCK AT THE QUARANTINE STATIONS AT 
BRIGHTON AND SOMERVILLE 
There were received at these stations during the year the fol- 
lowing: 75,071 cattle; 120,987 calves; 263,777 sheep and lambs, and 
736,804 swine. 

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES OF SWINE 
Service in connection with the immunization and treatment of swine in 
prevention of hog cholera and its allied diseases has been continued 
under the general plan employed during the past few years. This ser- 
vice is rendered without cost to such owners as apply, and who agree to 
comply with such regulations as are required by this Division. Owing 
to unusually favorable weather conditions during practically the entire 
year there has been a decided falling-off in the demand for treatment, 
as it is an undisputed fact that swine diseases are more prevalent in 
seasons in which there is a considerable amount of wet weather. During 
the year there were 93,199 treatments applied in connection with hog 
cholera, as compared with 113,321 treatments during the year 1928; and 
23,514 treatments for hemorrhagic septicemia, as compared with 33,442 
in 1928. 

RABIES 

There were 3,196 dogs reported to have bitten persons this year, and 

there were 618 dogs found to be affected with rabies, 244 less than last 

year. These figures are encouraging, and, we believe, indicate that local 

authorities are giving more attention to the enforcement of the dog 



8 P. D. 98 

laws. In order that this Division should be as helpful as possible in 
handling this serious situation, the following letter was sent: 

March 28, 1929. 
To Mayors of Cities and Chairmen of Selectmen of Towns: 
Gentlemen : — 

The time is approaching for the relicensing of dogs and Lwish to call 
your attention to the importance of enforcing all laws concerning dogs. 
The following facts in reference to the report of this Division for last 
year are startling and invite serious consideration. 

During the year over 3,000 people were reported as bitten by dogs 
and 880 dogs affected with rabies died or were killed, an increase of 
almost 100 positive cases over the previous year. There were approxi- 
mately 600 people who took the Pasteur treatment as the result of in- 
juries inflicted by dogs involving an estimated expense of at least $30,- 
000.00. 

Thus far this year the rabies situation has been more of a menace than 
ever. During last week there were reported three dogs affected with 
rabies which did considerable damage in Fitchburg, Wellesley and Need- 
ham. We find that a large number of the dogs affected with rabies are 
stray or ownerless dogs which would be entirely eliminated if the town 
and city authorities enforce the law in reference to the licensing of dogs. 

May we invite your active cooperation in a matter that so deeply con- 
cerns the people of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

Very truly yours, 

EVAN F. RICHARDSON, 

Director. 
Following is a report in detail for the year: 



RABIES 



Showing 
Symptoms 



Contact 



Bite Cases 





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£ 


9 


ff 


B 


M 


Q 


a 


£ 


£ 


M 


« 


Q 


H 


Forward, year 1928 








73 












117 








190 


December, 1928 . 


45 


7 


- 


22 


2 


l 








133 


2 


5 




217 


January, 1929 . 


49 


2 


- 


62 


3 


3 








113 


3 


5 




240 


February 


46 


8 


l 


62 


8 


- 




3 




141 


3 


7 




279 


March .... 


70 


7 


3 


58 


9 


4 








200 


1 


7 




359 


April .... 


55 


- 


— 


55 


7 


4 








268 


1 


3 




393 


May .... 


73 


2 


2 


370 


11 


8 








339 


1 


15 




821 


June .... 


31 


4 


2 


36 


3 


3 








378 


2 


8 




467 


July .... 


50 


4 


2 


104 


7 


3 








353 


3 


12 




538 


August 


55 


6 


1 


28 


1 


8 








326 


3 


12 




440 


September 


55 


7 


2 


- 


2 


2 






1 


273 


1 


5 




348 


October . . 


39 


— 


1 


20 


3 


— 








256 


5 


3 




327 


November . 


50 


3 


1 


— 


1 


9 








225 


5 


1 




295 


Forward 














166 












134 


300 



Total 



618 50 15 890 57 45 166 



1928 . . 811 50 38 655 97 51 73 

Total positive cases, 618 

The above record refers to the following animals* 

Cats 

Cattle . 

Dogs fiOo 47 12 555 48 

Horses 

Swine 

Monkeys 

Rat 

3,196 dogs bit persons during the year 1929. 

3,389 persons bitten (165 by rabid animals). 

456 h*ads examined (313 positive, 133 negative, 10 questionable). 



1 3,122 30 
- 1,949 28 



83 134 
109 117 



9 


3 




20 


8 




2 




1 


2 


1 


3 


. 605 


47 


12 


555 


48 


40 


1 




1 


3 




2 


1 




1 


310 







23 1 8 

1 3,097 29 74 134 



5,214 
3,978 



72 
9 
4,811 
7 
312 
2 
1 



P. D. 98 9 

INFECTIOUS ABORTION: BANG BACILLUS DISEASE 

Owing to the increasing number of states requiring that cattle shipped 
into their respective states must be accompanied by a certificate indicat- 
ing the animal shipped to be free from Bang Bacillus Disease and the 
desire on the part of breeders and the owners of high grade cattle to 
establish disease-free herds there is a rapidly growing demand for ser- 
vice in connection with this disease. 

During the fiscal year there were submitted to this Division 3,800 blood 
samples as compared with 834 received during the year 1928. Of this 
number 807 gave positive results, 654 were recorded as doubtful, 2,323 
were declared negative and 16 were unfit for examination. 

At present the laboratory reports are based on a dilution of from 
1 to 30, 1 to 60, 1 to 120, 1 to 240. An animal is considered as affected 
with Bang Bacillus Disease if examination of blood shows positive on 
dilutions of 1 to 60 or higher; doubtful, if a dilution of 1 to 30 is posi- 
tive but higher dilutions are negative; negative, if a positive result is 
not obtained in any dilution. 

Service as rendered at this time by this Division is limited to the ex- 
amination without expense to the owner of such samples of blood as are 
submitted and the furnishing of vials for the obtaining of such samples. 

One State institution has succeeded during the year in establishing a 
Bang Bacillus Disease-Free herd by removing all animals giving posi- 
tive results to examination of blood. 

MISCELLANEOUS DISEASES 

Actinomycosis : — Five head of cattle were reported for this condition, 
only one proving on examination to be affected with that disease. That 
animal was condemned and slaughtered. The other four animals were 
released from further observation. 

Anthrax: — No deaths from this disease were reported. Two animals 
reported suspected of being affected were found upon examination not to 
have Anthrax. 

Blackleg: — Service in connection with preventive treatment was fur- 
nished as in previous years, 745 animals having been given treatment on 
75 farms in 38 towns. 

Glanders: — One hundred seven horses were examined for glanders, 
four of which were found to have the disease and were killed. Two of 
these animals were detected from information obtained because of the 
owner contracting the disease, the horses proving on examination of 
blood to be affected. Bloods were taken from fifty-four horses in one 
stable in the city of Boston. Examination did not reveal presence of 
glanders. One hundred seventeen bloods were taken for laboratory ex- 
amination and ninety-four opthalmic tests were applied. 

Mange: — This condition was reported on three premises, eleven ani- 
mals being affected. Advice regarding treatment was given and animals 
upon recovery were released. 

Tuberculosis in Swine: — Thirty-four head of swine found at time of 
slaughter to be affected with tuberculosis were reported and a careful 
physical examination made of all other livestock maintained on premises 
from which these hogs were derived. Instructions relative to cleansing 
and disinfecting of premises were given. 

Other diseases, as Hodgkins Disease, Coli Bacillus Disease and Nodular 
Disease were reported and investigated. 

ANNUAL INSPECTION OF FARM ANIMALS AND PREMISES 

The usual order for inspection of all cattle, sheep and swine and of 
premises where kept was issued December 20, 1928, calling for comple- 
tion of the inspection on or before March 1, 1929. 

From the reports received from the Inspectors of Animals of all cities 



10 P. D. 98 

and towns in the Commonwealth, there were inspected on 24,011 prem- 
ises: 193,206 head of cattle, 8,228 sheep, 90,707 swine. 

Meetings of Inspectors of Animals were held during the year at Bos- 
ton, Pittsfield, Springfield, and Worcester. These meetings were well 
attended and it is believed resulted in improvement in the service ren- 
dered by the Inspectors. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Appropriation for the salary of the Director, 

chapter 146, Acts of 1929 $3,500.00 

Supplementary Budget, chapter 386, Acts 

of 1929 250.00 

Total amount appropriated 

Expended during the year for the salary of 

the Director 

Unexpended balance 



Appropriation for personal services of clerks 
and stenographers, chapter 146, Acts of 

1929 

Supplementary Budget, chapter 386, Acts 
of 1929 



Total amount appropriated 



Expended during the year for personal ser- 
vices of clerks and stenographers 

Unexpended balance 



Appropriation for services, other than person- 
al, including printing the annual report, 
traveling expenses of the Director, and 
office supplies and equipment, chapter 146, 

Acts of 1929 ...,-..: $6,000.00 

Supplementary Budget, chapter 386, Acts 

of 1929 2,400.00 





$3,750.00 


$3,625.00 
125.00 






$3,750.00 


$13,500.00 




480.00 






$13,980.00 


$13,977.17 
2.83 






$13,980.00 



Total amount appropriated $8,400.00 

Expended during the year for the following 
purposes : 

Books and Maps $56.25 

Express and messenger service 349.10 

Postage 1,681.21 

Printing report 54.61 

Other printing 803.21 

Telephone and telegrams 1,034.96 

Stationery and office supplies 2,529.56 

Expenses of the Director 1,321.49 



Total Expenditure $7,830.39 

Unexpended balance 569.61 



Appropriation for personal services of veterin- 
arians and agents engaged in the work of 
extermination of contagious diseases 



$8,400.00 



P. D. 98 11 

among domestic animals, chapter 146, 

Acts of 1929 $53,000.00 

Transferred from Appropriation for Extra- 
ordinary Expenses $2,000.00 

Brought forward from 1928 Appropriation 7.00 

Total amount appropriated ..'... $55,007.00 

Expended during the year for the following 
purposes : 

Services of salaried agents $36,601.90 

Services of per diem agents 17,884.00 

Labor hired 102.00 



Total expenditure $54,587.90 

Unexpended balance 419.10 



Appropriation for the traveling expenses of 
veterinarians and agents, including the 
cost of any motor vehicles purchased for 

their use, chapter 146, Acts of 1929 $22,000.00 

Transferred from Appropriation for Extra- 
ordinary Expenses 2,750.00 



Total expenditure $24,334.79 

Unexpended balance 415.21 



Total expenditure $5,033.72 

Unexpended balance 1,266.28 



$55,007.00 



Total amount appropriated $24,750.00 

Expended during the year for the following 
purposes : 
Traveling expenses of regular agents ....... $15,579.48 

Traveling expenses of per diem agents 8,755.31 



$24,750.00 
Appropriation for reimbursement of owners of 
horses killed during the present and prev- 
ious years, travel, when allowed, of in- 
spectors of animals, incidental expenses 
of killing and burial, quarantine and emer- 
gency services and for laboratory and 
veterinary supplies and equipment, chap- 
ter 146, Acts of 1929 . : $6,300.00 

Expended during the year for the following 
purposes : 

Supplies for veterinary inspectors $423.12 

Laundry 390.28 

Antiseptics, biologies and disinfectants 399.42 

Thermometers, needles, syringes, etc. 495.86 

Ear-tags, punches, chains, etc 1,397.42 

Expenses of killing and burial . 156.00 

Expenses of travel allowed inspectors of ani- 
mals 799.62 

Quarantine expenses 962.00 

Sundries 10.00 



$6,300.00 



12 P. D. 98 

Appropriation for reimbursement of owners 

oi tubercular cattle killed, as authorized 

by section twelve A of chapter 129 of the 

Gem ral Laws, inserted by section 1 of 

chapter :>(U of the Acts of 1924, and in 

accordance with certain provisions of law 

and agreements made under authority of 

section 33 of chapter 129 of the General 

Laws, as amended, during the present and 

previous years, chapter 146, Acts of 1929 $200,000.00 
Supplementary Budget, chapter 386, Acts 

of 1929 50,000.00 

Brought forward from 1928 appropriation 62,453.44 
Transferred from Appropriation for Extra- 
ordinary Expenses 2,500.00 



Total amount appropriated . . $314,953.44 

Expended during the year for the following: 
6,319 head of cattle killed (chapter 129, 

General Laws as amended) $310,475.10 

171 head of cattle killed (physical cases, 

including no lesion cases) 4,453.63 



Total expenditure $314,928.73 

Unexpended balance 24.71 



$314,953.44 
Appropriation for expenses in connection with 
the Eastern States conference, on tuber- 
culosis eradication among cattle when 
held in this commonwealth, chapter 386, 

Acts of 1929 $250.00 

Expended for expenses of Conference $249.39 

Unexpended Balance . .61 



$250.00 

The average amount paid for cattle slaughtered under the provisions 
of Chapter 353, Acts of 1922, Chapter 335, Acts of 1927 and Chapter 332, 
Acts of 1928, was $70.51 for registered purebred cattle and $45.80 for 
grade cattle. 

Thirty-eight claims for reimbursement for cattle condemned and killed 
as physical cases of tuberculosis during the year remain unsettled, these 
claims amounting to $950. 

Four hundred eighty-three (483) unpaid claims covering 2,920 cattle, 
to which provisions of Chapter 353, Acts of 1922 and Chapter 335, Acts 
of 1927, and Chapter 332, Acts of 1928, apply, remain unpaid, amounting 
to $143,120.93. 

There has been received during the year for dog fees in accordance 
with Chapter 347, Acts of 1928, $79; for sales of hides and carcasses 
$61.40; Hemorrhagic Septicemia treatments at Brighton $462.15. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EVAN F. RICHARDSON, 

Director. 



Public Document No. 98 

Wbt Commontoealtf) of JWa&Sacfjusetts 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



DIRECTOR OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY 



FOR THE 



Year ending November 30, 1930 

C/ 




( p ■ 



Publication of this Document approved by the Commission on Administration and Finance 
800— 6-*31. No. 2557 



Cl)t CoininoiHuraltl) of ftlassiuljusctfg 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION 

Division of Animal Industry 
Boston, November 30, 1930. 

To the Commissioner of Conservation: 

The report of the work of this Division for the year ending November 30, 1930, 
is herewith submitted. 

BOVINE TUBERCULOSIS 

Eradication of bovine tuberculosis in cattle is the most important activity of 
this Division. Interest in the tuberculin test has exceeded any previous year, 
applications on 34,616 cattle having been filed in 1930. 

Many of the cattle owners who are applying for the tuberculin test are doing so 
because they have been served an ultimatum that on .or before a certain date the 
milk sold from their dairies must be from tuberculin-tested cows or "no sale of 
milk." This Division, is, therefore, faced with the problem of putting on these 
tests when required or of having these dairymen driven out of business. During 
the last two years the cattle under supervision have increased from 39,766 to 
86,942. The testing of this large number has resulted in the slaughtering of 22,508 
reactors during the two-year period and at the same time the cattle population in 
the State has increased by almost 18,000.- The only conclusion to be drawn from 
the additional number of cattle under supervision and the increase in the cattle 
population is the fact that the tuberculin test is helpful to the dairy interests and 
must, therefore, result in larger production of milk. 

The total number of tests in 1929 was 92,733, and in 1930, 121,821. The cattle 
under supervision have increased by 28,897, making a total at the end of this year 
of 86,942 under test. In the budget for 1930, $400,000 was granted, but due to the 
unexpected growth of the work that sum was found inadequate and $200,000 
additional was appropriated in the Supplementary Budget. 

Owing to the great interest shown in tuberculin test work it was thought that 
a volunteer advisory council drawn from representative organizations might be 
of value in connection with the many problems involved. The following Massa- 
chusetts organizations were therefore invited to send a delegate: State Grange, 
Farm Bureau Federation, Tested-Herd Owners Association, Extension Service, 
Dairymen's Association and the Guernsey, Holstein and Jersey Breeders' Associa- 
tions. These delegates, with the Editor of the New England Homestead and 
the United States representative for this work in Massachusetts comprise the 
Advisory Council. This Council has been called together for five meetings and 
has been of great service. 

On July 2, 1930, Dr. George E. Corwin, formerly Deputy Commissioner of 
Domestic Animals in the state of Connecticut, was appointed Assistant Director. 

Section 33B of Chapter 129 of the General Laws as amended was further amended 
during the year, a portion of which reads as follows: 

"Section 33B. The director may, upon application to him by not less than 
seventy-five per cent of the cattle owners owning cattle permanently kept in any 
city or town in a county other than Barnstable, or upon like application by the 
owners of eighty-five per cent of such cattle, declare said city or town a quarantine 
area and may proceed to test by the tuberculin test or otherwise all bovine animals 
within said area." 

In accordance with this section, petitions have been received from the following 
towns: Rockport, Gloucester, Douglas, Westhampton, Middlefield, Goshen. 

For convenience the record of the work on tuberculosis eradication is divided 
into three classes: 

Mas* Secretary of tne Commonwealth 

•v ... 



P. D. 98 3 

(1) The Examination of Cattle Reported as Showing Physical Symptoms 
of Disease. 

The work of the department in connection with this classification is authorized 
under Chapter 129, Section 29 (requiring report of the existence of contagious 
disease in domestic animals), Section 11, (examination and condemnation of 
animals found to be affected with tuberculosis), and Section 12-A (payment for 
cattle condemned). 

During the year there has been reported 263 head of cattle included in this 
classification. Of this number 185 were examined physically, condemned and 
killed, 178 proving to be affected with tuberculosis and seven showing no lesions 
of that disease. On two animals a so-called "permit to kill" was granted as there 
was a doubt on physical examination as to whether the condition of the animal 
was due to tuberculosis or not. Both of these animals proved to be affected with 
some condition other than tuberculosis. Seventeen animals reported, died prior 
to being examined. Fifty-five animals were released as physical examination did 
not indicate tuberculosis. In the case of four animals no disposition was made, 
and these four cases have been carried forward for action next year. 

(2) The Tuberculin Testing of Cattle. 

Section 32, Chapter 129, General Laws, relative to the use of tuberculin and 
Chapter 353, Acts of 1922 the so-called "Request Test Law" were amended by 
Chapter 335, Acts of 1927, Chapter 332, Acts of 1928 and Chapter 341, Acts 
of 1930. 

The following tables are a record of the work accomplished in the testing of 
cattle at request of owner: 



P. 1) 98 






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P. D. 98 
COUNTY STATISTICS 

CaTTU 0MB < i.i an Two Clkan 

('i\m- i sin. K Tbst Test ^ts a< . 

Herds Bead Heidi Head % Herdfl Head Herds Head Herds Head 



liable 




2,218 




2,382 


100 


63 


90 


390 


071 


L84 


857 


-lure 


2,037 


22,731 


1,156 


15,720 


69 


392 


4,758 


318 


3,140 


876 


6,138 


Bristol . 


2,379 


20,031 




4,199 


20 


150 


1,064 


L5 


256 


36 


1,293 


Dukes . 


145 


820 


58 


469 




13 


62 


5 


11 


35 


329 


I 


1,564 


14,057 


468 


5,757 


40 


169 


l,45i 


110 


1,000 


07 


1,954 


Franklin 


2,005 


19,4 13 


1,162 


14,006 


72 


464 


3,906 


307 


4,2:«) 


332 


4,779 


Hampden 


1,827 


13,035 


386 


1,460 




98 


733 


96 


007 


L58 


2,188 


Hampshire 


1,894 


17, till 


696 


8,277 


41 


271 


2,030 


104 


707 


235 


3,00s 


Middlesex 


2,630 


22,876 


649 


7,796 


34 


228 


1,969 


140 


1,713 


13S 


1,885 


Nantucket 


40 


557 


10 


229 


40 






1 


18 





211 


Norfolk 


1,267 


9,429 


333 


4,51 t 


48 


52 


1,035 


119 


1,264 


126 


1,504 


Plymouth 


1,849 


10,460 


454 


1,426 


42 


1 52 


836 


86 


408 


154 


1,976 


Suffolk . 


39 


286 


10 


B4 


eg 


3 


30 


3 


9 


4 


45 


Worcester 


5,041 


•IS, SOS 


891 


14,627 


30> 


288 


2,618 


127 


1,966 


229 


5,448 



Total . 23,354 202,392 7,266 86,946 43 2,343 20,582 1,829 16,789 2,113 32,515 

The above figures indicate: 

1929 1930 

An increase of 2,418 herds under test 4,848 7,266 

An increase of 28,901 cattle under test 58,045 86,946 

An increase of 1,866 herds no reactors last test 4,319 6,185 

An increase of 19,425 cattle no reactors last test 50,461 69,886 

An increase of 662 herds accredited 1,451 2,113 

An increase of 8,556 cattle accredited 23,959 32,515 

The average salvage received by owners of reacting cattle for this year was $32.53 
as compared with $43.08 in 1929. 

The Brighton Market handled this last year 12,719 dairy cows. Of this number 
70% were eligible as additions to supervised herds and, therefore, entitled to 
white slips and the remaining 30%, not being eligible, were entitled to pink slips 
only. White slip cows and pink slip cows are kept separate upon entering the 
Brighton barn for sale. 

Inoculation for the prevention of Brighton or Shipping Fever, so-called, is, upon 
the arrival of the cattle at the Market, given practically at cost to cattle whose 
owners desire the same. There were this year 5,149 cattle immunized. This 
service is much appreciated by the Brighton dealers, and, we believe, prevents 
many fatalities from that disease. 

During the year there were 2,686 trucks which delivered 4,121 reactor cattle 
at the Quarantine Station, and these trucks in accordance with a ruling of this 
division were cleansed and disinfected before leaving the yard. The Brighton 
Stock Yards Company also requires that all trucks before taking dairy cattle from 
the Brighton Market must be cleansed and disinfected. 

These improvements in the method of handling cattle at the Brighton Market 
nave been helpful in raising the standard of that Market as a suitable place to 
buy dairy cows. 

During the year there were received at the Quarantine Station 2,368 head of 
Massachusetts cattle intended for dairy purposes. Two thousand three hundred 
and fifty-four (2,354) were accepted on records of test made prior to shipment; 
14 were held, submitted to test and then released. 

(3) Supervision of the Interstate Movement of Cattle into Massachu- 
setts. 

Following is a record of cattle received at the Quarantine Station at Brighton: 



5,652 


Maine 


2,185 


New Hampshire 


1,602 


Vermont 


732 


New York 


91 


Ohio 


18 


Connecticut 


3 


Rhode Island 


27 


Canada 



P. D. 98 7 

Released on approved certificate of health Held, Tested and Released 

2 

16 
20 

2 







1 

10,310. 41 

Total receipts 10,351 

Compared with 11,667 received in 1929 on papers, 37 held and tested, 2% of which 
reacted. 

There were 12,349 dairy cattle received at other points on permit from the 
following states: Canada, 283; Connecticut, 504; Illinois 1; Iowa, 79; Maine, 
1,261; Maryland, 33; Michigan, 56; Minnesota, 103; Missouri, 56; New Hamp- 
shire, 1,334; New Jersey, 15; New York, 1,380; Ohio, 1,111; Pennsylvania, 21; 
Rhode Island, 189; Vermont, 4,827; Virginia, 38; Wisconsin, 958; Wyoming, 1. 
Seventy-eight (78) of this 12,349 were tested after arrival, 18 reacting. In addi- 
tion to the dairy cattle there were received on permits 2,871 beef cattle, and 900 
cattle for exhibition purposes. This compares with 14,829 dairy cattle, 5,188 
beef cattle and 1,384 cattle for exhibition purposes in 1929. 

RECEIPTS OF LIVESTOCK AT THE QUARANTINE STATIONS AT 

BRIGHTON AND SOMERVILLE 

There were received at these stations during the year the following: 73,553 
cattle; 132,272 calves; 316,451 sheep and lambs; 620,138 swine. 

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES OF SWINE 

Service without cost other than for material used has been continued as in 
previous years for owners of swine. Weather conditions which have been excep- 
tionally dry during the entire year have been favorable for the raising of swine 
and tended to lessen the amount of sickness especially of the type usually allied 
with hog cholera, namely, hemorrhagic septicemia. 

A general policy has been adopted this past year of applying the simultaneous 
treatment (serum and virus) to young pigs (weighing 30 pounds and under) . This 
method together with the application of hemorrhagic septicemia aggressin at time 
of cholera treatment has, it is believed, resulted in a smaller loss following treat- 
ment and also in considerable saving to the swine owners for material used and a 
saving to the department of labor in lessening the number of treatments required. 

This work is done upon application of the owner who is required to sign a request 
and to agree to comply with certain regulations relative to quarantine, sanitation, 
etc. 

During the year there were applied 88,740 treatments for prevention of hog 
cholera and 23,166 treatments for control of hemorrhagic septicemia. 

RABIES 

During the year, 739 animals affected with rabies have been recorded, the disease 
occurring in all sections of the State. While this condition is usually referred to 
in connection with the dog, it is a disease of all warm-blooded animals and has 
during the past year been diagnosed not only in dogs but also in cats, horses, 
cattle and swine. As in other years, the method of control has been through the 
destruction of animals showing definite symptoms of disease and holding under 
restraint (quarantine) suspected animals and animals known to have been in 
contact with a diseased animal. Suspected animals are held until a definite diag- 
nosis is made. Contact animals are held 90 days from date of contact, a period 



8 P. D. 98 

which is shortened in animals that arc given anti-rabic treatment to. 21 days from 
date of completion of treatment. As shown in the tabulation, 71 contact animals 
developed the disease and died or were destroyed, 44 were killed by owners, no 
symptoms of ralues, 861 including 166 cases not disposed of at end of the year 
\W2\) were 4 released and 630 contact animals wen 1 still under restraint at the end 
of the year. 

Under Section t>, Chapter 111 of the General Laws, the State Department of 
Public Health has ruled that bites inflicted by dogB are to be included in the list 
of diseases declared to be dangerous to the public health and so in accordance with 
that ruling such doiz;s must be reported to this Division. Under this requirement 
there have been reported 4,739 persons bitten. These reports are referred by 
this Division to the local Inspector of Animals of the towns where injury was 
inflicted, for investigation and quarantine. Under Department Order No. 34, 
Section 3, such dogs if located "shall be quarantined for a period of 14 days for 
observation, at the end of which period if no symptoms of rabies have developed 
said animals may be released," etc. Four thousand one hundred and ninety-six 
dogs, cats, etc. were restrained under this order. Of the persons bitten 190 were 
bitten by dogs that were affected with rabies. 

When an animal that has bitten a person, dies, or is killed, it is required that 
the head of the animal be forwarded to the Department Laboratory for a definite 
diagnosis. During the year, there have been received the heads of 474 animals, 
315 of which were found positive for rabies, 32 on which no definite diagnosis could 
be made and 127 negative or not affected with rabies. 

Attention is called to the number of positive cases of rabies occurring in cattle 
and swine during the year. This condition is accounted for due to the fact that 
this class of animals are usually confined in groups and therefore are more exposed 
to attack by the usual carrier of the disease, namely, the rabid dog. 

The following table is a tabulation of cases recorded for the year: 



Showing Symptoms 



RABIES 

Contact 



Bite Cases 





- 




93 




a> o 








a 
o 










1) 

> 


0) 

> 


a 
_ o 


T3 
CD 
CD 

■ 


d or di 
sympt 
rabies 


> 
-el 


— c 

O C 


T3 

OS 


- '-3 

O sJ 

c 

41 


a 
> 
'-3 

~* * 


M 
«oT3 

o a 






'So 

o 


c3 

M 

9 


00 

9 

3 


.2 
"9 


=3 C O 


.-3 a 




.2 
"9 


— • a> 


a a 


a © 
2 a 


"3 

O 




Ch 


£ 


a 


m 


« 


W 


Q 


« 


« 


« 


Q 


h 


Forward, year 1929 . 








166 








134 








300 


December, 1929. . . 


65 


6 




101 


32 






194 


2 


4 




404 


January 1930 . 


42 


6 




192 


3 


4 




230 


7 


1 




485 


February 


177 


3 




111 


4 


10 




192 


2 


8 




507 


March 


51 


6 




57 


2 


6 




271 


4 


6 




403 


April 


58 




i 


12 




5 




366 


9 


9 




460 


May 


69 


6 


2 


42 


1 


2 




466 


9 


12 




609 


June 


41 


1 


5 


49 


1 


6 




576 


12 


10 




701 


July 


41 


6 


2 


105 




6 




521 


6 


8 




695 


August 


35 


5 


5 


22 




4 




426 


5 


9 




511 


September 


25 


5 


1 


2 








361 


6 


7 




407 


October . 


28 


6 


13 


2 




22 




239 


3 


1 




314 


November 


36 


3 


4 




1 


6 




111 


1 


1 




163 


Forward . 














630 








101 


731 



668 53 33 861 44 71 630 

TOTAL POSITIVE CASES, 739 



4087 66 76 101 



6690 



The above record refers to the following animals: 
















Bear 














1 








1 


Cats 


6 


1 


2 


7 


3 


1 


5 25 


1 


3 




54 


Cattle 


2 


4 




67 




10 










83 


Dogs 


580 


48 


30 


635 


41 


32 


65 4,060 


65 


73 


101 


5,730 


Horses 


1 






1 




2 










4 


Monkeys 














1 








1 


Poultry . 








12 














12 


Rat 






1 
















1 


Swine 


79 






139 




26 


560 








804 



P. D. 98 9 

BANG ABORTION DISEASE 

Bang Abortion Disease is an infectious disease of cattle and other animals and 
at the present time is a question of great moment to the live-stock industry. Con- 
ditions indicate that nowhere in the United States is it more prevalent than in 
our Eastern and New England States. From records available it is estimated 
that at least 85% of our herds are infected and that at least 20% of the animals 
contained therein are affected or give positive results to laboratory test. Massa- 
chusetts yearly imports many dairy cattle, some of which have not been subjected 
to the blood test and which cattle may be infected, which would undoubtedly 
tend to the spread of the disease. In order that Massachusetts may not become 
a dumping ground for known diseased or positive animals found in other states, 
the Division of Animal Industry has drawn up rules and regulations prohibiting, 
except under certain conditions, the importation of animals known to have reacted 
to the abortion test. These regulations printed below became effective July 16, 
1930. 

State House, Boston. 

Order No. 42 June 24, 1930. 

To Transportation Companies, Inspectors of Animals, and all persons whom it may 
concern: 

Section 1. A bovine animal which has recently aborted or which has given 
a positive or suspicious reaction to the agglutination or complement fixation test 
for Bang Abortion Disease (Contagious or Infectious Abortion) shall not be shipped, 
driven, transported or moved into the Commonwealth of Massachusetts except 
upon and accompanied by a special permit issued by the Director of Animal 
Industry. 

Section 2. Any animal brought in on a permit as referred to in Section 1 of 
this order is hereby declared to be in quarantine and must be held in isolation 
at the risk and expense of the person, firm or corporation owning the same until 
released by order of the Director. 

Section 3. An animal as referred to in Section 2 of this order after passing 
two approved negative blood tests for Bang Abortion Disease made after arrival 
and at least three months apart may be released by the Director. 

This order shall be published by the Inspector of Animals in each city and 
town in the Commonwealth by filing a copy hereof with the City Clerk or Town 
Clerk as the case may be and by posting a copy hereof in a conspicuous public 
place within the city or town for which he is the Inspector of Animals. 

Evan F. Richardson, 
Director of Animal Industry. 

Approved: 

W. A. L.BAZELEY, 

Commissioner of Conservation 

Approved in Council: July 16, 1930. 
WILLIAM L. REED, 

Executive Secretary 

Many herd owners, in order to have their herds free from Bang Abortion Disease 
and to meet sale and milk requirements, have taken steps to free their herds from 
this disease. The course which is pursued is the only known method by which 
herds may be freed and maintained as such, namely, blood testing — isolation — 
and proper sanitation. The blood test consists of the laboratory examination of 
the blood, known as the Agglutination test, for the detection of the positive or 
diseased animals. This test is proving satisfactory and reasonably accurate 
when applied under proper conditions and with care and intelligence. Hygienic 
and sanitary conditions must be constantly maintained. In order that herd 
owners may receive some assistance in building up and maintaining a herd free 
from Bang Abortion Disease and when freed and having passed a specified number 
of tests to be certified to as Bang Abortion Disease-free, the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, through the Division of Animal Industry, has, with the approval 
of the Governor and his Council, made the following rules and regulations: 



LO P. l). 98 

liU.KS AND IxKOl'LATIONS 

Applying bo the establishment of Bang Abortion Disease (Bovine Infectious 
Abortion) Free Accredited Herds on voluntary request of the owner 
Tinier the Provisions of Section 2, Chapter 129 of the General Law-, as Amended 
by Chapter 203, Acta of 1930. 

1. A Bang Abortion 1 )isease-Free Accredited Herd is one in which no evidence 
of Bang Abortion Disease has been indicated by three consecutive blood tests 
o\ all bovine animals in the herd six months of age or over made six or more months 
apart and which herd is maintained under State supervision for the eradication 
of tuberculosis. 

2. The owner must furnish information as to all bovine animals in the herd 
giving herd, tattoo or ear tag number, registration name and number date of 
birth, etc. A new or revised list must be furnished at time of each succeeding 
entire herd test. 

3. The hecessary work for the accreditation of a herd as free from Bang Abor- 
tion Disease shall be conducted co-operatively by the State and owner; the draw- 
ing of blood from the animal by an accredited veterinarian or an authorized repre- 
sentative of the Massachusetts Department of Conservation, Division of Animal 
Industry, the tagging and proper identification of each animal and the necessary 
sanitary procedure shall be arranged for by and at the expense of the owner. 

4. The examination of blood will be made without charge by the State, through 
the Division of Animal Industry, or may at the expense of the owner be made 
by any laboratory which is approved by the Director, and which laboratory fur- 
nishes the Director a copy of its reports. 

5. A. If one or more animals in the herd aborts or is positive to the blood 
test, it or they shall immediately be removed from the herd, information 
as to the identification and disposition of said animal or animals sent to 
the Division of Animal Industry, and the premises shall be promptly cleansed 
and disinfected. Such animal or animals shall not be returned to the herd 
unless and until it or they have passed two negative blood tests made at 
least six months apart, said test not to be made within two weeks prior to 
or three weeks following calving. 

B. If one or more animals in the herd aborts or is positive to the blood test, 
all animals in the herd six months of age or over shall be retested in from 
sixty to ninety days. 

6. Upon approval of the Director, a "Bang Abortion Disease-Free Accredited 
Herd" certificate shall be issued to herds the owners of which have complied with 
the preceding rules and regulations and which herds have passed the three con- 
secutive negative blood tests required by Regulation No. 1, and providing that the 
drawing of blood next prior to issuing the certificate shall be under the direct 
supervision of a representative of the Massachusetts Department of Conservation 
Division of Animal Industry. 

7. A. A Bang Abortion Disease-Free Accredited Herd shall be retested annually. 

B. If one animal in a Bang Abortion Disease-Free Accredited Herd at any 
time aborts or reacts to a blood test, the certificate of accreditation shall be sus- 
pended until all animals in the herd six months of age or over have passed one 
negative blood test made in not less than thirty days. 

C. If more than one animal in a Bang Abortion Disease-Free Accredited 
Herd at any time aborts or reacts to a blood test, the certificate shall be suspended 
until all animals in the herd six months of age or over have passed two negative 
blood tests made at least three months apart. 

8. Herd bulls may at the discretion of the owner be used for service on cattle 
which have not been tested and found free of Bang Disease. Service, however, 
must be on neutral ground. 

9. Additions to a Bang Abortion Disease-Free Accredited Herd must comply 
with the following: 



P. D.98 11 

A. Cattle from a Bang Abortion Disease-Free Accredited Herd may be 
added without restest. 

B. Pregnant animals unless from accredited herds must be isolated until 
after calving and must then pass a negative blood test made not earlier 
than three weeks after calving. 

C. Cattle with the exception of calves under six months of age from herds 
that are not accredited must pass two successive negative blood tests made 
not earlier than sixty nor later than one hundred and twenty days apart. 

D. Calves under six months of age may be added on one negative blood 
test. 

E. Cattle removed from an accredited herd for exhibition purposes must 
on their return pass a negative blood test made not earlier than three weeks 
after return. 

10. Upon violation of any of the foregoing rulse and regulations the certificate 
of accreditation may be suspended by the Director. 

EVAN F. RICHARDSON, - 
Director of Animal Industry. 
Approved : 

W. A. L. BAZELEY, 

Commissioner of Conservation 

Approved in Council: July 16, 1930 
WILLIAM L. REED, 

Executive Secretary 

There are at the "present time, from owners interested in having their herds 
"BANG ABORTION DISEASE-FREE", seventeen applications on file consisting 
of 428 animals. 

During the fiscal year there were submitted to this Division 7,782 blood samples 
for agglutination tests, compared with 3,800 received during the year 1929 and 
834 for the year 1928. Blood samples submitted to this Division are examined 
or tested without expense to the owner. Containers or vials for obtaining these 
blood samples are furnished on request and without cost. 

MISCELLANEOUS DISEASES 

Actinomycosis: — Only one case of this disease was reported. The affected animal, 
a cow, was slaughtered. 

Blackleg: — The use of aggressin in the preventive treatment against Blackleg 
in cattle was continued as in previous years. Seven hundred and seventy-two 
animals were treated on 81 farms in 38 towns. This service is rendered without 
cost to owners of cattle. 

Glanders: — Five horses affected with Glanders were condemned and killed. 
Three of these cases were in one stable in the city of Boston, and were found as 
the result of a blood test of all horses in the stable, conducted on account of the 
finding of a clinical case of the disease in a horse kept at said stable. Two stable 
tests were conducted during the year, one in a stable of 29 horses, the other in a 
stable of 40 horses. A total of 82 horses were examined during the year. Eighty 
samples of blood were examined and 49 ophthalmic tests applied. 

Mange: — This disease has been reported on only 8 premises, 21 animals being 
affected. It is believed that this condition has existed on many premises where 
it was considered as "barn itch" and accordingly not reported. Advice regarding 
treatment has been given where cases are reported and the animals released when 
recovery has taken place. 

Tuberculosis in Swine: — Fourteen head of swine affected with tuberculosis 
were reported. This condition is rarely called to the attention of the Department 
except at time of slaughter. When found, the case is traced back to point from 
which the animal originated and careful physical examination is made of all live- 
stock on the premises. Advice is given relative to disinfection, etc. 



12 P, I). 98 

Tuberculosis in Poultry: — From a genera] survey it is believed that this condi- 
tion do(>> not exist to any extent in this Commonwealth. The disease has, how- 
ever, been found during the year on two widely separated premises. These cases 

were handled l>y the owners, disposing of all adult heads by slaughter and careful 

cleansing and disinfection of houses and yards. 

PlanX Poisoning: -Owing to the Long dry period during the pasl summer and 
early fall with the consequent poor pasture conditions, several eases of plant <>r 
forage poisoning occurred due to the eating of shrubs, etc., of different varieties. 
Several deaths in cattle were reported from this condition in widely separated 
sections of the State. Symptoms and post-mortem findings strongly resembled 
hemorrhagic septicemia, which, however, was not borne, out by laboratory examina- 
tion, and the condition was ultimately found to be due to plant or forage poisoning. 

DISINFECTION 

In connection with the prevention and eradication of contagious diseases, 
and as important as is the removal or destruction of the infected animal itself, 
is the necessity of proper cleansing and disinfection of the premises where the 
disease has occurred. Too great care can not be taken to make certain that all 
litter is removed and buried, that ceilings, walls, floors, etc., are completely scraped 
and all cracks and crevices cleaned or removed through repairs after which the 
surface should be thoroughly washed and then sprayed with a proper disinfectant. 

Payment for animals on which compensation is authorized by the Common- 
wealth is not approved until the premises occupied by said animal or animals 
has been inspected and approved. This inspection is made by the local Inspector 
of Animals who, in addition to reporting as to whether the work has or has not 
been properly done is also required to report the name of the disinfectant used 
and the amount. Only such disinfectant as contains 50% or over of cresylic 
acid is approved in this work. 

ANNUAL INSPECTION OF FARM ANIMALS AND 

PREMISES 

The usual order for inspection of all cattle, sheep and swine and of premises 
where kept was issued December 10, 1929, calling for completion of the inspection 
on or before March 1, 1930. 

From the reports received from the Inspectors of Animals of all cities and towns 
in the Commonwealth, there were inspected on 23,354 premises: 202,392 head of 
cattle, 11,189 sheep, 87,311 swine. 

Meetings of Inspectors of Animals were held during the year at Boston, Barn- 
stable, Greenfield, Pittsfield, Springfield and Worcester. As usual these meetings 
were well attended and from the interest shown it is believed are of value to these 
officials. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Appropriation for the salary of the Director, chapter 

115, Acts of 1930 $3,875.00 

Expended during the year for the salary of the 

Director $3,875.00 

Appropriation for personal services of clerks and 

stenographers, chapter 115, Acts of 1930. ... . . . $17,300.00 

Expended during the year for personal services of 

clerks and stenographers $17,149.17 

Unexpended balance 150.83 

$17,300.00 

Appropriation for services other than personal, in- 
cluding printing the annual report, traveling 
expenses of the Director, and office supplies and 

equipment, chapter 115, Acts of 1930 $8,400.00 

Brought forward from 1930 appropriation 9.25 

Total amount appropriated $8,409.25 



P. D. 98 13 

Expended during the year for the following 
purposes : 

Books and Maps $58.85 

Express and messenger service 522.26 

Postage 1,670.42 

Printing report ' 54.98 

Other printing 987.87 

Telephone and telegrams 891.31 

Stationery and office supplies . . . 2,563.83 

Expenses of the Director 1,375.08 



Total Expenditure $8,124.60 

Unexpended balance 284.65 



$8,409.25 
Appropriation for personal services of veterinarians 
and agents engaged in the work of extermination 
of contagious diseases among domestic animals, 

chapter 115, Acts of 1930 $60,000.00 

Supplementary Budget, chapter 426, Acts of 1930 5,000.00 

Transferred from Appropriation for Extraordinary 

Expenses 1,150.00 

Brought forward from 1929 Appropriation 40.00 

Total amount appropriated $66,190.00 

Expended during the year for the following 
purposes: 

Services of salaried agents $39,068.35 

Services of per diem agents 26,985.80 

Labor hired 104.00 



$66,190.00 



Total expenditure $66,158.15 

Unexpended balance 31.85 

Appropriation for the traveling expenses of veterina- 
rians and agents, including the cost of any motor 
vehicles purchased for their use, chapter 115, 

Acts of 1930 $28,000.00 

Supplementary Budget Chapter 426, Acts of 1930 2,500.00 

Brought forward from 1929 Appropriation. 59.89 

Total amount appropriated $30,559.89 

Expended during the year for the following 
purposes : 

Traveling expenses of regular agents $16,546.28 

Traveling expenses of per diem agents 12,594.79 

Total expenditure $29,141.07 

Unexpended balance 1,418.82 



$30,559.89 
Appropriation for reimbursement of owners of horses 
killed during the present and previous years; 
travel, when allowed, of inspectors of animals, 
incidental expenses of killing and burial, quaran- 
tine and emergency services and for laboratory 
and veterinary supplies and equipment, chap- 
ter 115, Acts of 1930 $6,300.00 

Brought forward from 1929 Appropriation 35.50 

Total amount appropriated $6,335.50 



U P. D. 98 

Expended during the year for the following pur- 
poses: 
Four horses condemned and killed on account of 

glanders $230.00 

Supplies for veterinary inspectors 330.68 

Laundry ' _ 325.87 

Antiseptics, biologies and disinfectants 524. '.id 

Thermometers, needles, syringes, etc 553.50 

Bar-tags, punches, chains, etc 2,085.41 

Expenses of killing and burial 251.40 

Expenses of travel allowed inspectors of animals. . . . 1,193.95 

Quarantine expenses 838.60 



Total expenditure $6,334.40 

Unexpended balance 1.10 



$6,335.50 



Appropriation for reimbursement of owners of tuber- 
cular cattle killed, as authorized by section twelve 
A of chapter 129 of the General Laws, inserted 
by section 1 of chapter 304 of the Acts of 1924, 
and in accordance with certain provisions of law 
and agreements made under authority of sec- . 
lion 33 of chapter 129 of the General Laws, as 
amended, during the present and previous year, 
chapter 115, Acts of 1930 $400,000.00 

Supplementary Budget, chapter 426, Acts of 1930. . 200,000.00 
Brought forward from 1929 appropriation 24.71 

Total amount appropriated $600,024.71 

Expended during the year for the following: 

12,271 head of cattle killed (chapter 129, General 

Laws as amended) $595,997.56 

157 head of eattle killed (physical cases, in- 
cluding no lesion cases) 4,015.00 

Total expenditure $600,012.56 

Unexpended balance . . . 12.15 



$600,024.71 
Reimbursement of towns for inspectors of ani- 
mals: 
Appropriation for the reimbursement of certain towns 
for compensation paid to inspectors of animals, 

chapter 115, Acts of 1930 $5,500.00 

Expended during the year for reimbursement of 

certain towns $4,591.82 

Unexpended balance 908.18 

$5,500.00 

The average amount paid for cattle slaughtered under the provisions of Chapter 
353, Acts of 1922, Chapter 335, Acts of 1927 and Chapter 332, Acts of 1928, was 
$72.29 for registered purebred cattle and $46.34 for grade cattle. 

Forty-eight claims for reimbursement for cattle condemned and killed as physical 
cases of tuberculosis during the year remain unsettled, these claims amounting 
to $1,170. 

Six hundred one (601) unpaid claims covering 3,551 cattle, to which provisions 
of Chapter 353, Acts of 1922 and Chapter 335, Acts of 1927, and Chapter 332, 
Acts of 1928, apply, remain unpaid, amounting to $164,386.29. 



P. D. 98 15 

There has been received during the year for dog fees in accordance with Chapter 
347, Acts of 1928, $22; for sales of hides and carcasses $49.88; Hemorrhagic Septi- 
cemia treatments at Brighton $772.35; and one Court Fee of $1.75. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EVAN F. RICHARDSON, 

Director. 



Public Document 



No. 98 



©If? (ftnmmntuwalttj of Mmmt^nmltB 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OP THE 



DIRECTOR OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY 



FOR THE 



Year ending November 30, 1931 




(Offices: 20 Somerset Street, Boston.) 



( 



POJv 



Publication op this Document approved by the Commission on Administration and Finance 
800. 3-'32. Order 4976. 



£ljc Commontoealtf) of iflassacijusctts 



r, ■<? 






DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION 



Division of Animal Industry 
Boston, November 30, 1931. 

To the Commissioner of Conservation: — 

The report of the work of this Division for the year ending November 30, 
19:U. is herewith submitted. 

BOVINE TUBERCULOSIS 

Eradication of bovine tuberculosis is the most important activity of this 
Division. On December 1, 1930, we had on file at this office applications 
for the tuberculin test for over 10,000 head of cattle, and during the first 
four months of this year have received applications covering 28,642 cattle, 
with a total for the year of 51,189. We have been faced, therefore, with a 
difficult and impossible program, as the appropriations made by the Federal 
and State governments would not be sufficient to pay the indemnity which 
would be incurred in testing so large a number of cattle. This matter was 
then presented to the Commissioner of this Department, the Federal authori- 
ties, and the Advisory Council, and in accordance with their recommenda- 
tion it was decided to apply initial tests in those towns only from which 
we had received petitions for area test and quarantine. As the result of 
that procedure petitions for the area test and quarantine came in rapidly, 
totaling for the year 160 towns, as follows: 



Adams 

Alford 

Clarksburg 

Dalton 

Egremont 



Andover 

Beverly 

Danvers 



Ashfield 

Bernards ton 

Buckland 

Charlemont 

Colrain 

Conway 



Agawam 

B landlord 

Brimfield 

Chester 

East Longmeadow 



Amherst 
Chesterfield 



Ashby 
Ashland 
Ayer 
Boxborough 



Bellingham 

Franklin 

Medfield 



Berkshire County 

Florida Lee 

Great Barrington Lenox 

Hancock Monterey 

Hinsdale New Ashford 

Lanesborough Richmond 



Stockbridge 
Tyringham 
Williamstown 
Windsor 



Fairhaven 



Essex 

Haverhill 

Ipswich 



Deerfield 

Erving 

Gill 

Greenfield 

Hawley 

Leyden 



Goshen 

Granville 

Hampden 

Holland 

Longmeadow 



Bristol County 
Fall River 

Essex County 

Manchester 

Merrimac 

Middleton 

Franklin County 

Leverett 

Monroe 

Montague 

Northfield 

Orange 

Rowe 

Hampden County 

Middlefield 
Montgomery 
Russell 
South wick 
Tolland 



Rehoboth 



Hampshire County 
Cummington Huntington 

Hatfield Plainfield 

Middlesex County 

Carlisle Marlborough 

Concord Maynard 

Framingham Natick 

Lexington Shirley 





Norfolk County 


Med way 


Plain ville 


Millis 


Walpole 


Norfolk 


Westwood 



North Andover 
Topsfield 



Shelburne 
Sunderland 
Wendell 
Whately 



Wales 

Westhampton 

Wilbraham 



Ware 
Worthington 



Sudbury 

Tyngsboro 

Wayland 



Weymouth 
Wrentham 



P. D. 98 



Ashburnham 
Athol 
Auburn 
Barre 
Berlin 
Blackstone 
Bolton 
Boylston 
Brookfield 
Charlton 
Dana 
Dudley- 
East Brookfield 



Hull 





Plymouth County 






Plymouth 






Worcester County 




Gardner 


Northborough 


Sterling 


Grafton 


Northbridge 


Sturbridge 


Hard wick 


North Brookfield 


Sutton 


Hopedale 


Oakham 


Upton 


Hubbardsto: 


a Oxford 


Uxbridge 


Lancaster 


Paxton 


Warren 


Leicester 


Petersham 


Webster 


Leominster 


Phillipston 


Westborough 


Lunenburg 


Princeton 


West Brookfield 


Mendon 


Royalston 


Westminster 


Milford 


Rutland 


Winchendon 


Millville 


Southborough 


West Boylston 


New Braintree Spencer 





We have completed the area test in 53 of these towns, and in addition the 
towns of Rockport, Gloucester, Douglas, and Heath were declared modified 
accredited areas and protected by rules of quarantine approved by the Gov- 
ernor and Council on February 11, 1931 (Rockport and Gloucester), May 25, 
1931 (Douglas), and June 3, 1931 (Heath). 

There were made during the year 165,633 tuberculin tests, or an increase 
of 43,812 over the preceding year. 

The voluntary Advisory Council, which was organized in 1930, was 
called together three times during this year, and this group of delegates, 
representing the following organizations, have been most helpful in their 
suggestions : 

Massachusetts State Grange 

Massachusetts Jersey Breeders Association 

Massachusetts Farm Bureau Federation 

Massachusetts Tested-Herd Owners Association 

New England Homestead 

Massachusetts Extension Service 

Guernsey Breeders Association 

Holstein Breeders Association 

Massachusetts Dairymen's Association 

Massachusetts Milk Producers' Association 

United States Bureau of Animal Industry 

For convenience the record of the work on tuberculosis eradication is 
divided into three classes: 

(1) The Examination of Cattle Reported as Showing Physical Symp- 
toms of Disease 

The work of the department in connection with this classification is au- 
thorized under Chapter 129, Section 29 (requiring report of the existence 
of contagious disease in domestic animals), Section 11 (examination and 
condemnation of animals found to be affected with tuberculosis), and 
Section 12-A (payment for cattle condemned). 

During the year there has been reported 346 head of cattle included in 
this classification. Of this number 249 were examined physically, con- 
demned and killed, 243 proving to be affected with tuberculosis and 6 
showing no lesions of that disease. On four animals a so-called "permit to 
kill" was granted, as there was a doubt on physical examination as to whether 
the condition of the animal was due to tuberculosis or not. One of these 
animals proved to be affected with some condition other than tuberculosis. 
Twenty-five animals reported died prior to being examined. Fifty-one 
animals were released as physical examination did not indicate tubercu- 
losis. In the case of seventeen animals no disposition was made, and these 
seventeen cases have been carried forward for action next year. 

(2) The Tuberculin Testing of Cattle 
The following tables are a record of the work accomplished in the testing 
of cattle at request of owner: 



P. D. 98 



t- ~ 



B 
S 
P 

S 

H 

- 
O 

o 



a 
v, 

o 

o 
•a 



W 



H 





cc 




T) 




ffi 


a: 


c 




H 




S3 




£ 


fH 


tf 




O 


a 

K 






§ 


O 


— 
■ 
CP 




\» 


S5 



= 




PQ 


a 








« 


— 


1— 1 


Eh 




— 
- 


i— i 


ce 








m 




TJ 




H 




$ 



I— I oc 

o 
is 



ti 



— 



Ifi 1— • ~ . — — - - — 1 - . — I . — >■ J — 

/ -I / 


15,602 

9 .1 


16, 

19,057 

15.- 
16,1 

8,511 

15,106 
11,094 
11,760 

13,962 


co 

co 

SO 

iO 
CO 




CO 

f— 1 

0k 

CN 

i— " 


to occ" -r. r. -«fXo0N 
— • :c -o •- co — >cn co i-iM 


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CO r-t 


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oi co'cn *©« phi-Toon 


Ci 
CO 

CO 


fH CN^CN^^h ^«CO 


■H 

00 

o 

CN 




~h CCMMOflNNNOXN 

cm c ci 5C t>. •**"-! p* t* r^ eo i - *. 

CN MHfl r^ ro ,_, ,_ ^h ^ 


2,273 

2.8% 


t- COOOtN i'OCO'J'NOC 

t? coc; cqco^oocs ci o -<f o 
!>. o »o cc co ^< »o ci *o cc cc co 


o 

00 


CO ©OOCOhhnhO)^ 

O MN«O0CHHHT)lT|lO 

CO 'tN^'f <N "#tO ■<*<•* COLO 


© 
o 
o 


00 NCNOSHCNHC-CO 

CO CO— ''f NMrHNr-CC) 
(N <NCN*-« .-ICNi-H-t ,-1 


1,714 

7.1% 


■*f x coco -^x o»c cs h- -h 

O OO^Cit^CO'O-^ClCNOSCD 
CN X C C h N iq M h iO M Tf 

cn nnn'h e* m C* *+ r* t* 


CN 

<N 


© XOCOO^CKNMO* 
CO CN CN >0 Tt< C5 O t^ ^ CN CN GO 
CN COINING COCOCNCNCN^ 


© 
00 
CN 




O NCC^iOM^NOXNtD 
00 O LO 00 b- »0 >-< CN i-O i-0 b- 00 

oc wxq waoq^ 

,— 1 i— I .—I y— 1 i— I I— 1 


11,273 

40.7% 


CO C". CSt^O-*-<j<i.o©c0^kC 

■^ c^cnoococn nmxn© 

.■<* CN-^Co" rHi-HC0"cO 


CO 
1C 
CO 

CN 


CO ujOCNlNrtiOfflHOO 
1^ CXOMMHONOifl^ 
CO COCOM i-< CN CO •«# ■<* 


© 
cn 














1930 
December 

1931 
January 
February 
March 
April 
May . 
June . 
July . 
August 
September 
October 
November 


"c3 

O 

H 



CN© 



T3T3 

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S3 S3 
00 t* 

oo 

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T3T3 

»5 

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Cv V 

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cOl» 

y-l <-l 

COCO 






P. D. 98 



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tJ< GO 00 OS 00 OS b- 00 CO 1 -<f OS 
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Hi 
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conco cocoioooo co >o 

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o_ 

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<M* 






"t3 
O 

H 










Barnstable 

Berkshire 

Bristol . 

Dukes . 

Essex . 

Franklin 

Hampden 

Hampshire 

Middlesex 

Nantucket 

Norfolk 

Plymouth 

Suffolk 

Worcester 



6 



COl/NTY STATISTICS 






Cattle Census 
Herds Head 



I nder Test 
Herds Bead 



% 



Last Test 
Clean 

Herds Head 



P. D. 98 

Accredited 
Herds Head 



1 :l>le 




2,361 


628 




100 


_ 




t'.Os 


1,885 


Berkshire 






2,046 


24,044 


1,366 


18,688 


77 


666 


7,247 


660 


9,970 


Bristol . 






2,421 


20,311 


422 


5,083 


£5 


325 




72 


1,305 


Dukes 






134 


806 


56 


450 




17 


llfi 


37 


828 


Essex 






1,635 


1 1,190 


566 


8,583 


80 


316 


• 


220 


3,162 


Franklin 






2,086 


20,476 


1,467 


16,402 


80 


656 


4,915 


796 


11,008 


Bampden 






1,803 


18,879 


(104 


6,655 


48 


336 


2,658 


248 


3,161 


Bampehire 






1,966 


18,267 


937 


10,409 


57 


529 


4,613 


848 


4,896 


Middlesex 






2,680 


23,318 


778 


9,631 


41 


411 


4,388 


269 


3,683 


Nantucket 






37 


■IMS 


7 


229 


4* 


— 


— 


7 


229 


Norfolk . 






1,277 


9,427 


632 


5,449 


57 


299 


2,217 


168 


2,192 


Plvinouth 






1,790 


10,440 


467 


4,852 


46 


208 


1,637 


227 


2,476 


Suffolk . 






31 


266 


B 


80 


SO 


1 


1 


8 


79 


1 «ter 






5,071 


49,067 


1,830 


23,048 


47 


1,090 


10,063 


428 


7,718 


Total 






23,404 


207,128 


9,657 


111,820 


54 


4,844 


44,001 


4,091 


52,095 



The above figures indicate: 1930 1931 

An increase of 2,391 herds under test 7,266 9,657 

An increase of 24,874 cattle under test 86,946 111,820 

An increase of 2,650 herds no reactors last test . . . 6,285 8,935 

An increase of 26,210 cattle no reactors last test . . 69,886 96,096 

An increase of 1,978 herds accredited 2,113 4,091 

An increase of 19,580 cattle accredited 32,515 52,095 

The average salvage received by owners of reacting cattle for this year was 
$19.23 as compared with $32.53 in 1930. 

The Brighton Market handled this year 10,306 dairy cows. Of this 
number, 50 w r ere tested, 2 of which reacted and were killed. The interstate 
regulations went into effect June 1, 1931, and from that time on only such 
dairy cattle as are qualified to enter herds maintained under supervision 
were allowed in the Sales Barn. 

Inoculations for the prevention of Hemorrhagic Septicemia or Shipping 
Fever, so-called, is given, upon the arrival of the cattle at the Market, 
practically at cost at request of the owners. There were 4,326 cattle immun- 
ized, and we believe that this service is much appreciated by all concerned, 
and no doubt prevents many fatalities from that disease. 

Three thousand six hundred and seventy-four Massachusetts reactors 
were received at the Yards during the year; 2,663 arriving by truck and 1,011 
arriving by train. These cattle were identified and released for immediate 
slaughter on special permits to slaughtering establishments under Federal 
inspection and to establishments on the premises of the Brighton Abattoir. 
All the trucks and cars in which these reactors were brought in were disin- 
fected under supervision. The Sales Barn has been cleaned and disin- 
fected at regular intervals under the supervision of the United States Bureau 
of Animal Industry, and all trucks, numbering 1,852, taking dairy cows 
from this Market were disinfected under our supervision. 

(3) Supervision of Interstate Movement of Cattle into Massachu- 
setts 
Following is Order No. 43, approved by the Governor and Council on 
April 1, 1931: 

20 Somerset St., Boston, 
April 1, 1931. 

To Trarisportation Companies, Inspectors of Animals, and all Persons Whom 
it May Concern: 
Division Order No. 35 is hereby revoked and the following order submitted 
therefor: — 

Section 1. All bovine animals driven, shipped or in any way transported 
to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts from any point outside thereof 



P. D. 98 7 

must be accompanied by a permit signed by the Director of Animal Industry, 
except as provided in sections 3 and 4 of this order, and if intended for 
dairy or breeding purposes must also be accompanied by a certificate of 
tuberculin test* indicating said animal or animals to be direct from a herd 
of cattle maintained under State and Federal supervision for the eradication 
of bovine tuberculosis, in which herd no reactors were found at time of last 
entire herd test. 

The Director of Animal Industry may in his discretion ignore any such 
certificate and cause the animal or animals recorded thereon to be retested 
and may then proceed as under section 6 of this order. 

Section 2. Bovine animals intended for dairy or breeding purposes 
shall not be shipped or in any way transported to the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts in a car, truck, or vehicle containing cattle intended for any 
other purpose. 

Section 3. The premises of the Brighton Stock Yards Company in Brigh- 
ton within the city of Boston and the premises of the New England Dressed 
Meat and Wool Company in the city of Somerville are hereby declared to 
be quarantine stations, and. no animals are to be released therefrom except 
by permission of the Director of Animal Industry or an agent of the Division. 
Bovine animals may be shipped to these stations unaccompanied by a permit 
signed by the Director; provided, however, that said premises are not par- 
tially or entirely closed by order of the Director because of an outbreak of 
contagious disease among animals or for any other cause. 

Section 4. Animals intended for immediate slaughter and consigned to 
a slaughtering establishment which is under federal inspection need not be 
accompanied by a permit. Such animals shall not be removed therefrom alive. 

Section 5. All bovine animals driven, shipped or in any way transported 
to Massachusetts and arriving at any point other than the quarantine sta- 
tions mentioned in section 3 and federal-inspected premises as provided in 
section 4 are hereby declared to be in quarantine and must be held at the 
risk and expense of the person, firm or corporation owning the same until 
released by order of the Director. 

Any transportation company, person, firm or corporation in Massachu- 
setts receiving bovine animals which for any reason are not accompanied 
by a permit of the Director of Animal Industry, and by a certificate of tuber- 
culin test as provided in section 1 of this order shall immediately notify 
either the local inspector of animals or the Division of Animal Industry. 
The animals so received must not be removed from the premises where 
received except by order of said Director, and in the case of a transportation 
company they shall not be allowed to go out of the possession of said trans- 
portation company or its agent, or off the premises where they are unloaded, 
except by permission obtained from the Director or one of his agents. 

If for any cause bovine animals are brought within the limits of the state 
in violation of the provisions of this order, it shall be the duty of the local 
inspector of animals of any town in which they arrive to quarantine them 
and to communicate with the office of the Division of Animal Industry in 
regard to same. Their treatment or disposal shall be in accordance with 
the provisions of section 6 hereof. 

Section 6. Any bovine animals brought within the limits of the Com- 
monwealth not consigned for immediate slaughter and not accompanied 
by a certificate of tuberculin test as provided in section 1 of this order must 
be held and tuberculin tested by an accredited veterinarian and at the ex- 
pense of the owner or person in whose charge such animal or animals are 
held. Any animal which reacts to such tuberculin test shall be imme- 
diately tagged, branded and condemned and killed in accordance with 
section 11, chapter 129 of the General Laws. 

The provisions of this order do not apply to animajs which are under 
control of the Bureau of Animal Industry of the United States Department 
of Agriculture. 



8 P. D. 98 

This order shall be published by the Inspector of Animals in each city 

and town in the Commonwealth by posting a copy hereof in a conspicuous 

public place within the city or town for which he is Inspector of Animals. 

Evan F. Richardson, 

Director of Animal Industry. 

Approved: 
\V. A. L. Bazelbt, Commissioner of Conservation. 

Approved in Council April 1, 1931. 

William L. Reed, Executive Secretary. 



♦The certificate of tuberculin test must indicate teat made within one year of date of shipment if on 
cattle from an accredited herd or from a modified accredited area. The certificate of tuberculin test must 
indicate test made within six months of date of shipment if on cattle from herds in which no reactors 
were found at time of last entire herd test. 

The above order protects our Massachusetts diarymen in requiring that 
all dairy and breeding cattle eligible for shipment into this State must be 
qualified to go into any herd maintained under Federal and State supervision. 

Origin of the 10,306 Dairy Cows handled at Brighton Market 











Released 








on Papers 


Tested 


Total 


Massachusetts 


1,646 


7 


1,653 


Maine . 








5,031 


4 


5,035 


New Hampshire 








1,753 


15 


1,768 


Vermont 








1,099 


12 


1,111 


New York 








538 


11 


549 


Wisconsin 








25 





25 


Ohio . 








18 





18 


Rhode Island 








4 





4 


Connecticut . 








3 





3 


Canada. 








139 


1 

50 


140 




10,256 


10,306 


Disposition: 








To Massachusetts . . 8,971 


ro Vermont . 




. 8 


" Rhode Island . . 1,151 


" New York 




7 


" Maine . . .115 ] 


Reacted and killed 


2 


"\Toix7' WsmnfiriirP Q^ 








1\CW J. lCLillJJoilll C 

" Connecticut. 






17 


Total 




10,306 



There were 15,709 dairy cattle received at other points on permit from 
the following states: Canada, 448; Connecticut, 728; Delaware, 3; Idaho 
1; Illinois, 40; Iowa, 1; Maine, 1,339; Michigan, 96; Minnesota, 26 
Missouri, 81; New Hampshire, 2,010; New Jersey, 49; New York, 1,888 
Ohio, 2,217; Pennsylvania, 147; Rhode Island, 356; Tennessee, 61 ; Texas, 
1; Vermont, 4,372; Washington, 2; Wisconsin, 1,844. One hundred and 
seventy-two (172) of this 15,709 were tested after arrival, 18 reacting. 
In addition to the dairy cattle there were received on permits 3,920 beef 
cattle, and 1,058 cattle for exhibition purposes. This compares with 12,349 
dairy cattle, 2,871 beef cattle and 1,156 cattle for exhibition purposes in 
1930. 

RECEIPTS OF LIVESTOCK AT THE QUARANTINE STATIONS AT 
BRIGHTON AND SOMERVILLE 

There were received at these stations during the year the following: 69,963 
cattle; 126,899 calves; 336,372 sheep and lambs; 665,266 swine. 



P. D. 98 9 

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES OF SWINE 

Service in connection with the immunization and treatment of swine in 
prevention of hog cholera and its allied diseases has been continued under 
the general plan employed during the past few years. This service is rend- 
ered without cost to such owners as apply, and who agree to comply with 
such regulations as are required by this Division. During the year there 
were 86,031 treatments applied in connection with hog cholera, as compared 
with 88,740 treatments during the year 1930; and 31,401 treatments for 
hemorrhagic septicemia, as compared with 23,166 in 1930. 

RABIES 

During the year 1931 four hundred and eighty-four animals affected 
with rabies have been recorded, the disease occurring in all sections of the 
state. As in other years, the method of control has been through the 
destruction of animals showing definite symptoms of disease and holding 
under restraint (quarantine) suspected animals and animals known to have 
been in contact with a diseased animal. Suspected animals are held until 
a definite diagnosis is made. Contact animals are held 90 days from date 
of contact, a period which is shortened in animals that are given anti-rabic 
treatment to 21 days from date of completion of treatment. As shown in 
the tabulation, 16 contact animals developed the disease and died or were 
destroyed, 15 were killed by owners, showing no symptoms of rabies, 518 
including 10 cases not disposed of at end of the year 1930 were released, 
and 27 contact -animals were still under restraint at the end of the 
year. 

Under Section 6, Chapter 111 of the General Laws, the State Department 
of Public Health has ruled that bites inflicted by dogs are to be included 
in the list of diseases declared to be dangerous to the public health and so, 
in accordance with that ruling, such dogs must be reported to this Division. 
Under this requirement there have been reported 4,944 persons bitten. 
Under Department Order No. 34, Section 3, such dogs if located "shall be 
quarantined for a period of 14 days for observation, at the end of which 
period if no symptoms of rabies have developed said animals may be re- 
leased," etc. Under this order, 4,896 dogs, cats, etc., were restrained. Of 
the persons bitten, 104 were bitten by animals affected with rabies. When 
an animal that has bitten a person dies or is killed, it is required that the 
head of the animal be forwarded to the Department of Public Health Lab- 
oratory for definite diagnosis. During the year the heads of 523 animals 
have been received, 315 of which were found positive for rabies, 7 on which 
no definite diagnosis could be made, and 201 negative or not affected with 
rabies. 

A large number of cases of rabies that developed in the early spring were 
of sufficient concern to warrant the distribution on April 7 of a letter ad- 
dressed to the Mayors of Cities and the Chairmen of Selectmen of Towns, 
calling their attention to the serious situation and asking them to co-operate 
in enforcing the laws of the Commonwealth governing that disease. Later, 
as this situation continued with almost no abatement, this Division and the 
Department of Public Health co-operated in holding a mass meeting at the 
State House on June 25 to which were invited Mayors, Selectmen, Chiefs 
of Police, and Inspectors of Animals. As a result of that meeting, which 
was largely attended, quarantine regulations were put on in many towns 
and cities in the eastern part of the state; and we believe the publicity 
given at that time and the regulations issued as a result of that meeting 
were largely instrumental in the decrease in the number of animals affected 
with rabies from 739 last year to 484 this year. 

The eradication of rabies is to a large extent in the hands of the officials 
of the cities and towns of the Commonwealth, and we sincerely hope 
that their co-operation may be continued in the prevention of this dread 
disease. 



10 P. D. 98 

The following table is a tabulation of oases recorded for the year: 

RABIES 

s H(i\VlNO 

mptoms CONTACT Bite Cases 









0> 




* 

"2 


> 






a 

c 










a 
> 

8 


> 

'S 

■ 


3 

1 
c 
_o 

8 

3 


-a 

a 

0> 


o 

1 


I 


O. o> 
.2 ft 


1 

"a; 


g| 
1 

33 q> 


B 


■al 

0BT3 

s ft 


o 




fc 


z 


o 


» 


1 


a 


Q 


& 


B 


UJ 


Q 


H 


Forward, vcar 1930 








10 








18 








28 


Deoember, 1930 




52 


- 


— 


49 


2 


2 


- 


187 




2 


_ 


295 


January, L931 






43 


3 


2 


22 


1 


2 


- 


236 




9 


_ 


M7 


February 






46 


4 


- 


42 


3 


1 


- 


188 




3 


_ 


288 


March 








68 


2 


- 


212 


- 


4 


- 


283 




3 


- 


573 


April 








46 


9 


2 


60 


1 


1 


- 


504 




11 


- 


635 


May 








40 


7 


1 


39 


2 


1 


- 


466 


2 


17 


- 


575 


June 








46 


10 


1 


28 


:i 


- 


- 


559 


3 


19 


_ 


669 


July 








40 


12 


2 


31 


2 


1 


- 


757 


3 


22 


- 


870 


August . 








28 


8 


1 


10 


1 


- 


- 


553 


2 


12 


- 


615 


September 








20 


1 


1 


9 


- 


- 


- 


490 


3 


19 


- 


543 


her 








22 


6 


- 


6 


- 


3 


- 


363 


4 


7 


- 


411 


November 








18 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


255 


2 


4 


- 


280 


Forward 




















27 


- 


- 


- 


5 


32 


Total 


4G8 


62 


10 


518 


15 


16 


27 


4,858 


24 


128 


5 


6,131 


The above record refers to 


























the following animals: . 


























Cata 




8 


3 


1 


8 


2 


- 


5 


26 


- 


20 


- 


73 


Cattle . 








8 


3 


- 


32 


1 


3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


47 


I>"L'S 








452 


55 


9 


314 


12 


13 


22 


4,832 


24 


107 


5 


5,845 


Horses . 








— 


— 


- 1 


3 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


3 


Swine 








- 


1 


- 


161 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


162 


Squirrel 


























1 




1 



* No symptoms of rabies. 



Total positive cases of Rabies, 484 



BANG ABORTION DISEASE CONTROL 

The accreditation of herds as free from Bang Abortion Disease and tiie 
awarding of an official certificate under Massachusetts regulations and 
requirements apparently is appreciated by the breeders of purebred cattle in 
this State. There are at present eight accredited herds comprising 248 animals ; 
16 applications comprising 514 animals on file for accreditation; also a num- 
ber of herd owners who have not made application as yet but are preparing 
their herds for the test. Two shipments, comprising five animals, have 
been placed under quarantine for the reason that they were imported into 
Massachusetts in violation of Department regulations and which were known 
to have been reactors to the abortion test. 

During the fiscal year there were submitted to this Division 9.217 blood 
samples for agglutination tests, compared with 7,782 received during the 
year 1930 and 3,800 for the year 1929. Blood samples submitted to this 
Division are examined or tested without expense to the owner. Con- 
tainers or vials for obtaining these blood samples are furnished on request 
and without cost. 

MISCELLANEOUS DISEASES 

Actinomycosis: Six head of cattle affected with this condition were re- 
ported. 

Anthrax: Two cases reported in cattle were confirmed by laboratory 
examination. 

Blackleg: Preventive treatment was applied to 886 head of cattle on 99 
premises located in 39 towns. 

Glanders: Twenty- two horses were subjected to test one of which proved 
to be diseased. This horse was condemned and destroyed. 



P. D. 98 11 

Mange: This condition was found in 29 head of cattle located on five 
premises. 

Tuberculosis in Swine: Three cases were reported and diagnosis confirmed. 

Many specimens were submitted for examination and diagnosis for actino- 
mycosis, anthrax, botulism, bone infection, glanders, hemorrhagic septi- 
cemia, tuberculosis, tumors, etc. 

ANNUAL INSPECTION OF FARM ANIMALS AND PREMISES 

The usual order for inspection of all cattle, sheep and swine and of prem- 
ises where kept was issued November 20, 1930, calling for completion of 
the inspection on or before February 1, 1931. 

From the reports received from the Inspectors of Animals of all cities 
and towns in the Commonwealth, there were inspected on 20,982 premises: 
207,128 head of cattle, 9,994 sheep, 82,509 swine. 

Meetings of Inspectors of Animals were held during the year at Boston, 
Barnstable, Greenfield, Lowell, Pittsfield, Springfield, Taunton and Worces- 
ter. As usual, these meetings were well attended and from the interest 
shown it is believed are of value to these officials. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Appropriation for the salary of the Director, 

chapter 245, Acts of 1931 $4,000.00 

Expended during the year for the salary of the 

Director 4,000.00 

Appropriation for personal services of clerks and 

stenographers, chapter 245, Acts of 1931 . . $21,000.00 
Supplementary Budget, Chapter 460, Acts of 

1931 850 00 

Total amount appropriated $21,850.00 

Expended during the year for personal services of 

clerks and stenographers $20,883 . 19 

Unexpended balance 966 . 81 

$21,850.00 

Appropriation for services other than personal, 
including printing the annual report, travel- 
ing expenses of the Director, office supplies 
and equipment and rent, Chapter 245, Acts 
of 1931 $14,035.00 

Brought forward from 1930 appropriation 112.30 

Total amount appropriated $14,147.30 

Expended during the year for the following 
purposes: 

Books and Maps $95 . 86 

Express and messenger service 378 . 47 

Postage 2,186.20 

Printing report 79 . 38 

Other printing 1,181.91 

Telephone and telegrams 921 .09 

Stationery and office supplies 3,848.05 

Rent and office equipment 3,787 . 65 

Travel 1,411 .87 



Total Expenditure $13,890.48 

Unexpended balance 256 . 82 



$14,147.30 



12 P. D. 98 

Appropriation for personal services of veterina- 
rians and agents engaged in the work of ex- 
termination of contagious diseases among 
domestic animals, chapter 245, Acts of L931 $73,000.00 
Supplementary Budget, chapter 460, Acts of 

1931 6,000.00 

Total amount appropriated $79,000.00 

Expended during 1 the year for the following 
purposes: 

Services of salaried agents $40,222.52 

Services of per diem agents 37,417.00 

Labor hired 106.00 



$79,000.00 



Total expenditure $77,745.52 

Unexpended balance 1,254.48 

Appropriation for the traveling expenses of vet- 
erinarians and agents, including the cost of 
any motor vehicles purchased for their use, 
chapter 245, Acts of 1931 $37,500.00 

Supplementary Budget, chapter 460, Acts of 

1931 . 800.00 

Brought forward from 1930 Appropriation .... 26.47 

Total amount appropriated $38,326.47 

Expended during the year for the following 
purposes: 

Traveling expenses of salaried agents $19,140 32 

Traveling expenses of per diem agents 16,148.38 



Total expenditure $35,288.70 

Unexpended balance 3,037 . 77 



$38,326.47 



Appropriation for reimbursement of owners of 
horses killed during the present and previous 
years; travel, w r hen allowed, of inspectors 
of animals, incidental expenses of killing and 
burial, quarantine and emergency services 
and for laboratory and veterinary supplies 
and equipment, chapter 245, Acts of 1931 . . . $8,000 . 00 

Expended during the year for the following 

purposes: 
Four horses condemned and killed on account of 

glanders $300.00 

Supplies for veterinary inspectors 306 . 23 

Laundry 413 . 77 

Antiseptics, biologies and disinfectants 437 . 74 

Thermometers, needles, syringes, etc 494 . 53 

Ear-tags, punches, chains, etc 2,332.97 

Expenses of killing and burial 227 . 50 

Expenses of travel allowed inspectors of animals . 1 ,094 . 25 

Quarantine expenses 919 . 75 

Sundries 15.90 



Total expenditure $ 6,542.64 

Unexpended balance 1,457 . 36 



$8,000.00 



P. D. 98 13 

Appropriation for reimbursement of owners of 
tubercular cattle killed, as authorized by sec- 
tion twelve A of chapter 129 of the General 
Laws, inserted by section 1 of chapter 304 of 
the Acts of 1924, and in accordance with 
certain provisions of law and agreements 
made under authority of section 33 of chap- 
ter 129 of the General Laws, as amended 
during the present and previous year, chap- 
ter 245, Acts of 1931 $800,000.00 

Brought forward from 1930 appropriation .... 12 . 15 

Total amount appropriated $800,012. 15 

Expended during the year for the following: 
15,886 head of cattle killed (chapter 129, General 

Laws as amended) $687,004.98 

259 head of cattle killed (physical cases including 

no lesion cases) 6,125.00 



Total expenditure $693,129 .98 

Unexpended balance 106,882 . 17 

$800,012.15 

Reimbursement of towns for inspectors of ani- 
mals: 

Appropriation fof the reimbursement of certain 

towns for compensation paid to inspectors of 

animals, chapter 245, Acts of 1931 $5,500.00 

Expended during the year for reimbursement 

of certain towns $4,951 . 41 

Unexpended balance 548 . 59 

$5,500.00 

The average amount paid for cattle slaughtered under the provisions of 
Chapter 129, General Laws, as amended, was $62.73 for registered purebred 
cattle and $41.90 for grade cattle. 

There has been received during the year for dog fees in accordance with 
Chapter 347, Acts of 1928, $17; for Hemorrhagic Septicemia treatments at 
Brighton $648.90, and for damage to State-owned motor vehicle, $47. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Evan F. Richardson, 

Director, 



Public Document 



No, 



- . 3<? 
Cfte €ommcmtoealtf> of ^a^gacfjusetta 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



DIRECTOR OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY 



Year ending November 30, 1932 



V 




Offices: 20 Somerset Street, Boston 




Publication of this Document Approved by the Commission on Administration and Finance 
750. 2— '33. Order 7553. 



Cbr «f nmmouluralrh of ittau e.ulntsr trs 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION 

DIVISION OF Animal Industry 

Fo (Aa Commissioner of Conservation: — 

The report of the work of this Division for the year ending November 30, 1932, 
is herewith submitted. 

BOVINE TUBERCULOSIS 

Eradication of bovine tuberculosis is the most important activity of this Di- 
vision. To November 30th, 1932, we have received petitions for the area test and 
quarantine (Chapter 129, Section 33 B, General Laws, Tercentenary Edition) 
from 270 towns and cities in the Commonwealth. This number does not include 
the 15 towns in Barnstable County in which the area test was completed in the 
early part of 1929, making a total of 291 of the 355 cities and towns of the Common- 
wealth. Of the G4 remaining cities and towns which have not as yet filed petitions 
for the area test a large number of them are in the eastern part of the State or 
within the metropolitan area in which are very few cattle. In these 64 cities and 
towns a large number of the cattle, however, are already under State and Federal 
supervision. 

The area test was completed in Barnstable County and that county declared a 
modified accredited area in June, 1929. The area test was applied in 57 towns in 
1931 and Rockport, Gloucester, Douglas, and Heath were declared modified ac- 
credited areas. This year the area test has been completed in 81 towns and 23 of 
these towns declared modified accredited areas making a total at the present time 
of 157 towns in which the area test has been completed and 42 towns which have 
been declared modified accredited areas. 

Following is the list of cities and towns which have filed petitions: 







Berkshire 


County 




* Adams 


♦Hancock 




New Marlborough 


♦Tyringham 


*Alford 


^Hinsdale 




♦North Adams 


Washington 


Becket 


♦Lanesborough 




Otis 


West Stockbridge 


♦Clarksburg 


♦Lee 




Pittsfield 


♦Williamstown 


*Dalton 


♦Lenox 




♦Richmond 


♦Windsor 


Egremont 


♦Monterey 




Sandisfield 




♦Florida 


Mount Washington 


Sheffield 




♦Gt. Barrington 


♦New Ashford 




♦Stockbridge 








Bristol County 




Dighton 


♦Fall River 




Norton 


Taunton 


Eastern 


Freetown 




♦Rehoboth 


Westport 


♦Fairhaven 


North Attleborough 










Essex County 




Amesbury 


Hamilton 




♦Merrimac 


Rowley 


♦Andover 


♦Haverhill 




Methuen 


Salem 


Beverly 


♦Ipswich 




♦Middleton 


Salisbury 


Boxford 


Lawrence 




Newbury 


Saugus 


♦Danvers 


Lynn 




Newburyport 


Swampscott 


♦Essex 


Lvnnfield 
Manchester 




♦North Andover 


Topsfield 


♦♦Gloucester 




Peabody 


Wenham 


Georgetown 


Marblehead 




♦♦Rockport 


West Newbury 


Groveland 














Franklin County 




♦♦Ashfield 


♦Erving 




♦♦Monroe 


♦♦Shelburne 


♦Bernardston 


♦Gill 




♦Montague 


♦Shutesbury 


♦♦Buckland 


♦Greenfield 




♦New Salem 


♦Sunderland 


♦♦Charlemont 


♦♦Hawley 




♦Northfield 


♦Warwick 


♦♦Colrain 


♦♦Heath 




♦Orange 


♦Wendell 


♦♦Conway 


♦Leverett 




♦♦Rowe 


♦Whately 


♦Deerfield 


♦Leyden 


Hampden 


County 




♦Agawam 


♦♦Granville 




Monson 


♦♦Tolland 


♦♦Blandford 


Hampden 




♦♦Montgomery 


♦Wales 


♦Brimfield 


♦Holland 




Palmer 


West Springfield 
Westfield 


♦♦Chester 


Holyoke 




♦♦Russell 


Chicopee 
♦East Longmeadow 


♦Longmeadow 
Ludlow 


South wick 
Springfield 


♦Wilbraham 



Mass. Secretary of toe Commonwealth 



P. D. 98 

*Amherst 

Belchertown 
**Chesterfield 
**Cummington 

Easthampton 

Enfield 

Acton 
*Ashby 

Ashland 
*Ayer 

Bedford 

Billerica 
*Boxborough 
*Carlisle 

Chelmsford 
*Concord 

Avon 
*Bellingham 
Braintree 
Canton . 
Cohasset 
Dover 

*Bridgewater 
*E. Bridgewater 
*Halifax 

*Ashburnham 

Athol 

Auburn * 

*Barre 
* Berlin 
*Blackstone 

Bolton 

Boylston 
*Brookfield 
*Charlton 

Clinton 
'-''Dana 
**Douglas 
*Dudley 
*E. Brookfield 

Fitchburg 

*Area test completed. **Modified accredited areas. 

There were made during the year 237,718 tuberculin tests, or an increase of 
72,085 over the preceding year. 

For convenience the record of the work on tuberculosis eradication is divided 
into three classes: 

(1) The Examination of Cattle Reported as Showing Physical Symptoms 

of Disease 

The work of the department in connection with this classification is authorized 
under Chapter 129, Section 28 (requiring report of the existence of contagious 
disease in domestic animals), Section 11 (examination and condemnation of ani- 
mals found to be affected with tuberculosis), and Section 12-A (payment for cattle 
condemned). 

During the year there has been reported 291 head of cattle included in this 
classification. Of this number 187 were examined physically, condemned and 
killed, 185 proving to be affected with tuberculosis and two showing no lesions of that 
disease. On 15 animals a so-called "permit to kill" was granted, as there was a 
doubt on physical examination as to whether the condition of the animal was due 
to tuberculosis or not. Five of these animals proved to be affected with tubercu- 
losis and 10 proved to be affected with some other condition. Twenty-two 
animals reported died prior to being examined. Fifty-eight animals were released 
as physical examination did not indicate tuberculosis. In the case of 9 animals no 
disposition was made, and these 9 cases have been carried forward for action next 
year. 

(2) The Tuberculin Testing of Cattle 

The following tables are a record of the work accomplished in the testing of 
cattle at request of owner: 



, 


Hampshire County 




**Goshen 


**Middlefield 


Southamptou 


Granby 


Northampton 


*Ware 


Greenwich 


Pelham 


**Westhampton 


Hadley 


**Plainfield 


Williamsburg 


*Hatfield 


Prescott 


**Worthington 


**Huntington 


South Hadley 
Middlesex County 




*Dracut 


Lowell 


*Sudbury 


Dunstable 


•*Marlborough 


Tewksbury 


*Framingharr 


i *Maynard 


Townsend 


Groton 


*Natick 


Tyngsboro 


Holliston 


North Reading 


*Wayland 


Hopkinton 


Pepperell 


Westford 


Hudson 


Reading 


Weston 


^Lexington 


Sherborn 


Wilmington 


Lincoln 


*Shirley 




Littleton 


Stow 
Norfolk County 




Foxborough 


Norwood 


Sharon 


*Franklin 


*Plainville 


*Walpole 


*Medfield 


Quincy 


*Westwood 


*Medway 


Randolph 


Weymouth 


* Millis 




*Wrentham 


* Norfolk 


Plymouth County 




Hingham 


Mattapoisett 


Plymouth 


*Hull 


*Middleborough 


West Bridgewater 


Lakeville 


Worcester County 


Whitman 


*Gardner 


*North Brookfield 


Sturbridge 


*Grafton 


Northborough 


*Sutton 


*Hardwick 


*Northbridge 


Templeton 


Harvard 


*Oakham 


Upton 


Holden 


* Oxford 


*Uxbridge 


*Hopedale 


*Paxton 


Warren 


Hubbardston Petersham 


Webster 


Lancaster 


Phillipston 


*West Boylston 


Leicester 


Princeton 


West Brookfield 


*Leominster 


Royalston 


Westborough 


Lunenburg 


* Rutland 


^Westminster 


*Mendon 


Shrewsbury 


Winchcndon 


Milford 


*Southborough 


Worcester 


Millbury 


Southbridge 




*Millville 


*Spencer 




*New Brainti 


ree ^Sterling 





I\ I). 98 



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6 



Counties 



COUNTY STATISTICS 

Cattli I i n.sus* DmnTwi** 

Herdi Head Herda Head % 



P. D. 98 



Last Test 
CUBAM 

Herda Head 



Accredited 

Herds Head 



Barnstable 


(,::. 


2.217 


530 


2,208 


too 


319 


814 


111 


1,894 


Berkshire 


2.1 19 


25,882 


1,681 


22,113 


86 


796 


7,663 


856 


13,865 


Bristol . 


2,471 


22,105 


717 


7,000 


36 


no 


3,393 


218 


2,973 


Dukea 


1 12 


7 SO 


07 


502 


04 


3J 


218 


33 


282 


1 --< \ 


1,578 


13,724 


1,015 


9,062 


00 


646 


4,875 


325 


4,252 


Franklin 


2,220 


21,255 


2,240 


20,120 


100 


1 , 1 7f) 


6,398 


1,045 


13,800 


Hampden 


1 ,834 


14,020 


962 


8,245 


80 


. r )70 


3,243 


335 


4,499 


Hampshire 


2,046 


19,319 


1,317 


13,238 


08 


713 


5,018 


531 


7,054 


Middlesex 


2,609 


22,911 


1,310 


13,180 


81 


710 


6,181 


380 


5,013 


Nantucket 


35 


480 


7 


236 


80 






7 


230 


Norfolk . 


1,207 


9,018 


72S 


6,620 


78 


452 


3,239 


225 


2,777 


Plymouth 


1,868 


10,702 


784 


0,505 


00 


462 


2,571 


231 


2,577 


Sufi. -Ik 


20 


188 


B 


7.: 


88 


l 


13 


7 


00 


\\ ..i i after 


5,291 
24,151 


49,582 


3,216 
14,702 


35,471 
145,864 


71 


2,137 
8,464 


18,48(1 


750 


12,846 


Total 


212,783 


GS 


61, 557 


5,203 


71,100 



•Taken in December, 1931. •♦November 30, 1932. 

The above figures indicate: 1931 1932 

An increase of 5,045 herds under test 9,657 14,702 

An increase of 34,044 cattle under test 1 11,820 145,864 

An increase of 4,792 herds no reactors last test 8,935 13,727 

An increase of 36,657 cattle no reactors last test 96,096 132,753 

An increase of 1,172 herds accredited 4,091 5,263 

An increase of 19,101 cattle accredited 52,095 71,196 

The average salvage received bv owners of reacting cattle for this year was 
$13.88 as compared with $19.23 in 1931. 

The Brighton Market handled this year 10,486 dairy cows. Of this number, 
44 were held for retest and released. 

Inoculations for the prevention of hemorrhagic septicemia or shipping fever, 
so-called, is given at request of the owners and practically at cost upon the arrival 
of the cattle at the market. There were 3,952 cattle immunized. 

Four thousand one hundred and twenty-two (4,122) Massachusetts reactors 
were received at the yards during the year; 3,672 arriving by truck and 450 ar- 
riving by train. These cattle were identified and released for immediate slaughter 
on special permits to slaughtering establishments under Federal inspection and to 
establishments on the premises of the Brighton Abattoir. All the trucks and 
cars in which these reactors were brought in w T ere, prior to leaving, disinfected 
under supervision. The Sales Barn has been cleaned and disinfected at regular 
intervals under the supervision of the United States Bureau of Animal Industry, 
and the 1,580 trucks taking dairy cows from this market were disinfected under 
our supervision. 

(3) Supervision of Interstate movement of Cattle into Massachusetts 

Origin of the 10,486 Dairy Cows handled at Brighton Market 

Released 









on Papers 


Tested 


Total 


Massachusetts . 




1,848 


2 


1,850 


Maine 






5,157 


5 


5,162 


Xew Hampshire 






1,825 


19 


1,844 


Vermont . 






1,170 


18 


1,188 


Xew York 






297 





297 


Wisconsin . 






108 





108 


Rhode Island 






3 





3 


Connecticut 






13 





13 


Canada . 






21 



44 


21 






10,442 


10,486 




Disposition 






To Massachusetts 


8,940 


To New Hampshire . 


19 


" Rhode Island 


. 1,448 


" Connecticut 


: 


5 


" Maine . 




72 


" Vermont 


• 


2 



Total 



10,486 



P. D. 98 7 

There were 19,307 dairy cattle received at other points on permit from the 
following states: Canada, 974; Connecticut, 1198; Indiana, 49; Iowa, 1; Louis- 
iana, 9; Maine, 1201; Maryland, 1; Michigan, 225; Minnesota, 196; Missouri, 26; 
New Hampshire, 2981 ; New Jersey, 28; New York, 1330; Ohio, 2632; Pennsylvania, 
425; Rhode Island, 368; Tennessee, 9; Vermont, 5110; Washington, 5; Wisconsin, 
2539. Three hundred and sixteen (316) of the 19,307 were tested after arrival, 10 
reacting. In addition to the dairy cattle there were received on permits 3,008 
beef cattle, and 1,299 cattle for exhibition purposes. This compares with 15,709 
dairy cattle, 3,920 beef cattle and 1,058 cattle for exhibition purposes in 1931. 

Receipts of Livestock at the Quarantine Stations at Brighton and 

somerville 

There were received at these stations during the year the following: 58,641 
cattle; 112,525 calves; 331,340 sheep and lambs; 634,841 swine. 

RABIES 

During the year 1932, three hundred (300) animals were recorded affected with 
rabies as compared with 484 cases in the previous year. Of this number 222 were 
dogs as compared with 465 dogs last year. Of the 79 positive contact cases 71, 
(55 sheep, 16 goats), occurred on one farm where a rabid dog got into an enclosure 
where these animals were confined; a startling example of the damage one rabid 
dog may inflict. 

In addition to the decrease in the number of animals reported as "showing 
symptoms" 276 as compared with 540 in the year 1931 (see table) there was also 
a marked decrease in the number of "contact" animals, 285 compared with 566 
in 1931 and 4,742 "bite cases" compared with 4,997 in 1931. 

The following table is a tabulation of cases recorded for the year: 



Showing 

Symptoms 



Rabies 

Contact 



Bite Cases 









£ 




i * 

73 








a 

O 










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3 

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£ 
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Forward, year 1931 


_ 


_ 


_ 


27 


_ . 


_ 


_ 


5 


_ 


_ 




32 


December, 1931 




20 


3 


— 


15 


— 


1 


— 


232 


3 


7 


— 


281 


January, 1932 






20 


1 


- 


8 


- 


2 


- 


237 


3 


10 


- 


281 


February 






19 


4 


- 


19 


- 


1 


- 


232 


- 


1 


- 


276 


March . 








32 


3 


— 


41 


— 


1 


- 


326 


2 


3 


- 


408 


April 








45 


6 


- 


32 


3 


71 


- 


455 


- 


9 


- 


621 


May 








23 


8 


- 


19 


1 


- 


- 


554 


3 


15 


- 


623 


June 








25 


4 


- 


37 


2 


2 


- 


542 


4 


10 


- 


626 


July 








15 


I' 


4 


16 


- 


- 


- 


580 


1 


10 


- 


627 


August . 








11 


4 


1 


10 


- 


1 


- 


514 


2 


10 


- 


553 


September 








6 


8 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


369 


1 


6 


- 


391 


October 








1 


5 


1 


— 


— 


- 


— 


279 


3 


10 


— 


299 


November 








4 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


218 


1 


6 


- 


230 


Forward 








- 


- 


— 


- 


- 


- 


3 


- 


- 


- 


84 


87 


Total 


221 


48 


7 


224 


6 


79 


3 


4,543 


23 


97 


84 


5,335 


The above record refers to 


























the following animals: 


























Cats .... 


— 


1 


1 


1 


2 


— 


- 


24 


2 


4 


— 


35 


Cattle . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Dogs 








215 


47 


6 


223 


4 


7 


3 


4,518 


21 


93 


84 


5,221 


Horses . 








1 






















1 


Goats . 








2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


16 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


18 


Sheep . 








3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


55 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


58 


Monkey 






















1 






" 


1 



*No symptoms of rabies. 



Total positive cases of rabies, 300. 



72 persons were bitten and 159 persons were exposed by direct contact, through 
handling, etc. rabid dogs. Laboratory examination was made of the brain of 277 
animals. 140 were positive, 133 negative, and 4 examinations unsatisfactory. 



8 P, D. 9S 

BANG ABORTION DISEASE CONTROL 

The interest in Bang Abortion Disease control continues. The breeders of pure- 
bred cattle are very much concerned in eradicating Bang Disease from their herds 
as the advantageous sale of their animals depends upon freedom from the disease. 
Accredited certificates are issued by this Division when herds placed under super- 
vision pass three semi-annual tests. 

There are at present twelve accredited herds comprising 476 animals; 27 appli- 
cations comprising 842 animals on file for accreditation. During the fiscal year 
there were submitted to this Division 1 0,050 blood samples for the agglutination 
test as compared with 9,217 received during the year 1931 and 7,782 for the year 
L930, Blood samples submitted to this Division are examined or tested without 
expense to the owner. Containers or vials for obtaining these blood samples are 
furnished on request and without cost. 

An order is in effect to prohibit the importation into the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts of any bovine animal which has aborted or is known to be positive 
to the blood test unless a special permit is obtained. Forty States have promul- 
gated rules and regulations regarding the importation into their respective States 
of animals known to be affected with Bang Abortion Disease. 

MISCELLANEOUS DISEASES 

Actinomycosis: Eight head of cattle affected with this condition were reported. 

Blackleg: Preventive treatment was applied to 1,12.4 head of cattle on 137 prem- 
ises located in 41 towns. 

Glanders: Four horses were reported. Laboratory tests indicated that they were 
not affected with glanders. 

Hog Cholera and Hemorrhagic Septicemia: During the 3'ear there were 90,444 
treatments applied in connection with hog cholera, as compared with 8G,031 treat- 
ments during the year 1931 ; and 20,879 treatments for hemorrhagic septicemia, as 
compared with 31,401 in 1931. 

Mange: This condition was found in 7 head of cattle located on three premises. 

Tuberculosis in Swine: Forty-nine cases found on post-mortem examination at 
time of slaughter were reported. 

Specimens were submitted for examination and diagnosis for actinomycosis, 
anthrax, glanders, hemorrhagic septicemia, tuberculosis, tumors, etc. 

ANNUAL INSPECTION OF FARM ANIMALS AND PREMISES 

The usual order for inspection of all cattle, sheep and swine and of premises 
where kept was issued November 16, 1931, calling for completion of the inspection 
on or before January 15, 1932. 

From the reports received from the Inspectors of Animals of all cities and towns 
in the Commonwealth, there were inspected on 24,146 premises: 212,783 head of 
cattle, 10,279 sheep, 91,060 swine. 

Meetings of Inspectors of Animals were held during the year at Boston, Green- 
field, Pittsfield, Springfield, and Worcester. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Appropriation for the salary of the Director, Chapter 

170, Acts of 1932 $4,000.00 

Expended during the vear for the salary of the 

Director 4,000.00 

Emergency appropriation for personal services of 

clerks and stenographers, Chapter 69, Acts of 

1932 $ 1,500.00 

Appropriation, Chapter 170, Acts of 1932 22,800.00 

Total amount appropriated $24,300.00 

Expended during the year for personal services of 

clerks and stenographers $23,417.71 

Unexpended balance 882.29 

$24,300.00 



P. D. 98 9 

Appropriation for services other than personal, 

including printing the annual report, traveling 

expenses of the Director, office supplies and 

equipment and rent, Chapter 170, Acts of 1932 $14,000.00 

Expended during the year for the following 

purposes : 

Books and maps $84.88 

Express and messenger service 315.36 

Postage 2,668.74 

Printing report 46.62 

Other printing 705.71 

Telephone and telegrams 890.59 

Travel 984.15 

Stationery and office supplies 2,711.17 

Rent and office equipment 5,442.68 



$14,000.00 



Total Expenditure $13,849.90 

Unexpended balance 150.10 

Appropriation for personal services of veterinarians 

and agents engaged in the work of extermination 

of contagious diseases among domestic animals, 

Chapter 170, Acts of 1932 $78,500.00 

Transfer, Chapter 307, Acts of 1932 6,500.00 

Brought forward from 1931 appropriation ....... 12.50 

Total amount appropriated $85,012.50 

Expended during the } r ear for the following 
purposes : 

Services of salaried agents $43,099.00 

Services of per diem agents 41,809.75 

Labor hired 100.00 



$85,012.50 



Total expenditure $85,008.75 

Unexpended balance , . . .' 3.75 

Appropriation for the traveling expenses of veter- 
inarians and agents, including the cost of an^y 
motor vehicles purchased for their use, Chap- 
ter 170, Acts of 1932 . , $28,400.00 

Transfer, Chapter 307, Acts of 1932 1,500.00 

Brought forward from 1931 appropriation 192.13 

Total amount appropriated $30,092.13 

Expended during the year for traveling expenses of 

agents $30,090.76 

Unexpended balance 1 .37 

$30,092.13 

Appropriation for reimbursement of owners of horses 
killed during the present and previous years; 
travel, when allowed, of inspectors of animals, 
incidental expenses of killing and burial, quaran- 
tine and emergency services and for laboratory 
and veterinary supplies and equipment, Chapter 

170, Acts of 1932 $6,600.00 

Expended during the year for the following 
purposes : N 



10 

Supplies For veterinary inspectors 

Laundry 

Antiseptics, biologies and disinfectants 

Thermometers, needles, syringes, etc 

Bar-tagS, punches, chains, etc 

Expenses of killing and burial 

Expenses of travel allowed inspectors of animals. . . . 

Quarantine expenses 

Sundries 



Total expenditure 
Unexpended balance 



P. D. 98 



$195.20 

405.70 

403.59 

481.63 

2,348.78 

200.00 

559.85 

1,196.40 

5.75 



$5,802.1)0 
797.10 



Appropriation for reimbursement of owners of tuber- 
cular cattle killed, as authorized by section 
twelve A of chapter 129 of the General Laws, in- 
serted by section 1 of chapter 304 of the Acts of 
1924, and in accordance with certain provisions 
of law and agreements made under authority of 
section 33 of chapter 129 of the General Laws, 
as amended during the present and previous 
vcar, chapter 170, Acts of 1932 

Transferred, Chapter 307, Acts of 1932 



$750,000.00 
8,000.00 



Balance of amount appropriated $742,000.00 

Brought forward from 1931 appropriation 106,882.17 



Total amount appropriated 

Expended during the year for the following: 
23,156 head of cattle killed (chapter 129, General 

Laws as amended) $793,244.32 

183 head of cattle killed (physical cases including no 

lesion cases) 4,161.80 



Total expenditure 
Unexpended balance 



Reimbursement of towns for inspectors of animals: 

Appropriation for the reimbursement of certain towns 

for compensation paid to inspectors of animals, 

chapter 170, Acts of 1932 

Brought forward from 1931 appropriation 

Total amount appropriated 

Expended during the year for reimbursement of 

certain towns 

Deficiency 



$797,406.12 
51,476.05 



$5,000.00 
10.00 



$5,247.06 



$6,600.00 



$848,882.17 



$848,882.17 



$5,010.00 



237.06 



The average amount paid for cattle slaughtered under the provisions of Chapter 
129, General Laws, as amended, was $55.43 for registered purebred cattle and 
$33.21 for grade cattle. 

There has been received during the year for dog fees in accordance with Chapter 
347, Acts of 1928, $15; for Hemorrhagic Septicemia treatments at Brighton $592.70; 
and for damage to State-owned motor vehicles $57.85. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Evan F. Richardson, 

Director. 



Public Document 



No. 98 



€&c Commontoeaitl) of JHa0£aclm£ett£ 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



DIRECTOR OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY 



Year ending November 30, 1933 




Offices: 20 Somerset Street, Boston 



POULI O 

Publication of this Document Approved by the Commission on Administration and Finance 
967. 3-'34. Order 967. 



Mass. Secretary oi tiw Commonwealth 
The 



€(je Cominontoealftj of JWa!j£acl)u£ett£ 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION 

Division of Animal Industry 
To the Commissioner of Conservation: 

The report of the work of this Division for the year ending November 30, 1933, 
is herewith submitted. 

BOVINE TUBERCULOSIS 

Eradication of bovine tuberculosis is the most important activity of this Divi- 
sion. To November 30, 1933, we have received petitions for the area test and 
quarantine (Chapter 129, Section 33B, General Laws, Tercentenary Edition) from 
15 towns and cities in the Commonwealth, in addition to the 286 petitions received 
prior to this year, making a total of 301. Of the 54 remaining cities and towns 
which have not as yet filed petitions for the area test a large number of them are 
in the eastern part of the State or within the metropolitan area in which are very 
few cattle, and also in these 54 cities and towns a large number of the cattle are 
already under State and Federal supervision. 

The area test was completed in Barnstable County and that county declared a 
modified accredited area in June, 1929. The area test was applied in 57 towns in 
1931 and Rockport, Gloucester, Douglas, and Heath were declared modified 
accredited areas. In 1932 the area test was completed in 81 towns and 23 of those 
towns declared modified accredited areas. The present year 73 towns have been 
area tested, and 16 towns have been declared modified accredited areas, making a 
total to date of 230 towns in which the area test has been completed and 58 towns 
which have been declared modified accredited areas. 

There were made during the year 265,260 tuberculin tests, or an increase of 
27,542 over the preceding year. 

For convenience the record of the work on tuberculosis eradication is divided 
into three classes: 

1. The Examination of Cattle Reported as Showing Physical Symptoms 

of Disease 

The work of the department in connection with this classification is authorized 
under Chapter 129, Section 28 (requiring report of the existence of contagious 
disease in domestic animals), Section 11 (examination and condemnation of animals 
found to be affected with tuberculosis), and Section 12-A (payment for cattle 
condemned). 

During the year there have been reported 119 head of cattle included in this 
classification. Of this number 87 were examined physically, condemned and 
killed, 85 proving to be affected with tuberculosis and two showing no lesions of 
that disease. On one animal a so-called "permit to kill" was granted, as there 
was a doubt on physical examination as to whether the condition of the animal 
was due to tuberculosis or not. This animal proved to be affected with tuber- 
culosis. Four animals reported died prior to being examined. Twenty-four 
animals were released as physical examination did not indicate tuberculosis. In 
the case of 3 animals no disposition was made and these 3 cases have been carried 
forward for action next year. 

2. The Tuberculin Testing of Cattle 

The following tables are a record of the work accomplished in the testing of 
cattle at request of owner: 



P. D. 98 



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P. D. 98 



Counties 



COUNTY STATISTICS 



Cattle Census* 
Herds Head 



Under Test** 
Herds Head % 



Last Test 
Clean 
Herds Head 



Accredited 
Herds Head 



Barnstable 


626 


2,189 


622 


2,154 


100 


327 


781 


293 


1,295 


Berkshire 






2,265 


26,840 


2,330 


26,972 


100 


1,244 


9,096 


1,040 


17,214 


Bristol . 






2,545 


19,259 


1,315 


12,298 


63 


834 


5,897 


306 


4,295 


Dukes 






141 


823 


85 


585 


71 


48 


247 


33 


288 


Essex 






1,630 


13,120 


1,179 


10,573 


80 


667 


4,061 


456 


5,703 


Franklin . 






2,281 


21,567 


2,236 


20,798 


100 


845 


3,606 


1,382 


17,030 


Hampden 






1,944 


14,641 


1,160 


10,423 


71 


629 


3,855 


498 


5,997 


Hampshire 






2,141 


20,267 


1,613 


16,009 


79 


828 


5,287 


735 


9,839 


Middlesex 






2,666 


21,744 


2,020 


18,083 


83 


1,316 


8,884 


552 


7,674 


Nantucket 






32 


465 


8 


230 


50 


1 


4 


7 


226 


Norfolk . 






1,249 


8,877 


821 


7,152 


80 


479 


2,867 


298 


3,770 


Plymouth 






1,913 


10,953 


1,130 


8,169 


7k 


719 


3,645 


338 


3,769 


Suffolk . 






25 


187 


7 


71 


38 


7 


71 






Worcester 






5,498 


48,721 


4,315 


43,801 


90 


2,585 


18,560 


1,469 


22,036 


Total 






24,956 


209,653 


18,841 


177,318 


8k 


10,529 


66,861 


7,407 


99,136 



*Taken in December, 1932. **November 30, 1933. 

The above figures indicate: ' 1932 1933 

An increase of 4,139 herds under test 14,702 18,841 

An increase of 31,454 cattle under test 145,864 177,318 

An increase of 4,209 herds no reactors to last test .... 13,727 17,936 

An increase of 33,244 cattle no reactors to last test . . . 132,753 165,997 

An increase of 2,144 herds accredited 5,263 7,407 

An increase of 27,940 cattle accredited 71,196 99,136 

In the cleansing and disinfection of premises from which reacting cattle have 
been removed, it is required that a disinfectant approved by the United States 
Bureau of Animal Industry must be used. 

The local Inspector of Animals is instructed to inspect the premises after dis- 
infection is completed and to report all repairs made, and is now required to report 
the name and quantity of disinfectant used. It is believed these requirements 
have resulted in more efficient disinfection, and are the principal factors in the 
decided drop in the number of reactors recorded in subsequent tests as shown by 
the table on page 3, the percentage in 1933 indicating 3.4% reactors to the first 
retest (second test) as compared with 5.2% for the year 1932, etc. 

The average salvage received by owners of reacting cattle for this year was 
$13.46, as compared with $13.88 in 1932. 

The Brighton Market handled this year 10,314 dairy cows. Of this number, 
52 were held for retest and released. 

Inoculations for the prevention of hemorrhagic septicemia or shipping fever, so- 
called, is given at request of the owners and practically at cost upon the arrival of 
the cattle at the market. There were 3,871 cattle immunized. 

Three thousand fifty (3,050) Massachusetts reactors were received at the yards 
during the year; 3,007 arriving by truck and 43 arriving by train. These cattle 
were identified and released for immediate slaughter on special permits to slaughter- 
ing establishments under Federal inspection and to establishments on the premises 
of the Brighton Abattoir. All the trucks and cars in which these reactors were 
brought in were, prior to leaving, disinfected under supervision. The Sales Barn 
has been cleaned and disinfected at regular intervals under the supervision of the 
United States Bureau of Animal Industry, and the 1,253 trucks taking dairy 
cows from this market were disinfected under our supervision. 



6 P. D. 98 

Supervision oi [nterstate Movement of Cattle into Massachusi 

Origin of the tO,Sl ', Dairy Cows handled at Brighton Market 

h'( leased 









on Papers 


Tested 


Total 


Massachusetts . 




7 


1,911 


Maine 






4,914 


3 


4,917 


New Hampshire 






1,884 


19 


1,903 


Vermont 






1,204 


21 


1,225 


New York 






267 


2 


269 


Ohio . 






45 





45 


Wisconsin . 






22 





22 


Rhode Island 






21 





21 


Connecticut 






1 



52 


1 






10,262 


10,314 




Disposition 






To Massachusetts 


. 8,898 To New Hampsh 


ire . 


11 


" Rhode Island . 


. 1,389 " Connecticut 


. 


8 


" Maine . 




7 


11 Vermont 


• 


1 



Total 



10,314 



There were 22,208 dairy cattle received at other points on permit from the 
following states: Canada, 1,232; Connecticut, 1,586; Illinois, 36; Indiana, 216; 
Iowa, 50; Kentucky, 24; Maine, 1,921; Maryland, 1; Michigan, 147; Minnesota, 
504; New Hampshire, 3,917; New Jersey, 41 ; New York, 779; Ohio, 2,682; Penn- 
sylvania, 693; Rhode Island, 519; South Carolina, 1; Vermont, 5,712; Wash- 
ington, 2; Wisconsin, 2,145. Three hundred and four (304) of the 22,208 were 
tested after arrival. In addition to the dairy cattle there were received on permits 
3,886 beef cattle, and 1,399 cattle for exhibition purposes. This compares with 
19,307 dairy cattle, 3,008 beef cattle and 1,299 cattle for exhibition purposes in 1932. 

Receipts of Livestock at the Quarantine Stations at Brighton and 

somerville 

There were received at these stations during the year the following: 72,855 
cattle; 121,531 calves; 294,438 sheep and lambs; 637,887 swine. 

RABIES 

During the year 1933, 175 animals were recorded affected with rabies as com- 
pared with 300 cases in the previous year. Of these cases forty or about 25% 
occurred in the City of Boston. 

In addition to the decrease in the number of animals reported as "showing 
symptoms" 222 as compared with 276 in the year 1932 (see table), there was also 
a marked decrease in the number of "contact" animals, 121 compared with 285 in 
1932. 

The following table is a tabulation of cases recorded for the year: 



P. D. 98 



Rabies 



Showing 
Symptoms 



Contact 



Bite Cases 









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Forward, year 1932 . 








3 








84 








87 


December, 1932 






8 


1 


- 


25 


- 


- 


- 


245 


2 


7 


- 


288 


January, 1933 . 






8 


4 


- 


26 


- 


- 


■ - 


245 


3 


4 


- 


290 


February 








2 


4 


i 


8 


- 


- 


- 


253 


1 


7 


- 


276 


March . 








7 


5 


— 


1 


— 


— 


- — 


308 


2 


4 


— 


327 


April 








18 


4 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


471 


2 


7 


- 


504 


May 








16 


7 


- 


5 


— 


- 


— 


573 


2 


9 


- 


612 


June 








21 


5 


- 


6 


i 


- 


- 


613 


6 


18 


- 


670 


July 








18 


1 


3 


23 


2 


- 


— 


608 


4 


20 


- 


679 


August . 








21 


1 


1 


4 


— 


- 


— 


507 


3 


11 


- 


548 


September 








12 


2 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


443 


- 


14 


- 


473 


October . 








14 


5 


2 


9 


1 


— 


— 


318 


1 


2 


— 


352 


November 








29 


2 


_ 


- 


- 


1 


- 


245 


— 


8 


- 


285 


Forward . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


5 


- 


- 


- 


4 


9 


Total 


174 


41 


7 


114 


4 


1 


5 


4,913 


26 


Ill 


4 


5,400 


The above record refers to 


























the following animals: 


























Cats .... 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


- 


12 


- 


22 


- 


40 


Cattle . 








1 


1 


_ 


2 


- 


— 


- 


- 


— 


1 


- 


5 


Dogs 




* 




171 


37 


6 


111 


3 


1 


5 


4,901 


26 


87 


4 


5,352 


Swine 








1 






















1 


Goats 








1 






















1 


Squirrels 


























1 


~ 


1 



*No symptoms of rabies. 



Total positive cases, 175 



Seventy-seven (77) persons were bitten by rabid dogs. Laboratory examination 
was made of the brains of 291 animals. One hundred thirty-six (136) were positive, 
151 negative, and 4 examinations unsatisfactory. 



BANG ABORTION DISEASE CONTROL 

The number of States that require information regarding freedom from Bang 
Abortion Disease in connection with the interstate movement of cattle has increased 
each year, many States now requiring health certificates indicating agglutination 
test results, a few requiring that cattle consigned to their respective States must 
have passed a negative blood test within a given limit of time. 

Massachusetts does not as yet require information regarding blood tests on 
interstate cattle but does, by Department Order No. 42, forbid the shipment of 
positive reactors as follows: 

"Section 1. A bovine animal which has recently aborted or which has given a 
positive or suspicious reaction to the agglutination or complement fixation test for 
Bang Abortion Disease (Contagious or Infectious Abortion) shall not be shipped, 
driven, transported or moved into the Commonwealth of Massachusetts except 
upon and accompanied by a special permit issued by the Director of Animal 
Industry." 

No permits have been issued this year except for immediate slaughter. 

Eleven thousand, nine hundred seventy-three (11,973) blood samples were 
examined this year as compared with 10,050 for the year 1932. 

While the technique of the examination by the agglutination test has practically 
been standardized, there is still a difference of opinion by authorities on Bang 
Abortion Disease as to the significance of positive results to agglutination titres of 
less than 1-100. Under the Massachusetts plan for the issuance of Bang Abortion 
Disease Free Accredited Herd certificates, it is required that no evidence of Bang 
Abortion Disease has been indicated by three consecutive blood tests of all bovine 
animals in the herd six months of age or over, the examination to indicate negative 
results to dilutions of 1-25 through 1-200, the records to indicate readings of 1-25, 
1-50, 1-100, 1-200. 



8 P. D. 98 

Under this plan eleven of the twelve herds which were accredited in 1932 have 
been reaecredited and ten additional herds have been awarded Abortion Disease 
Free Accredited certificates, making a total of twenty-one accredited herds com- 
prising 865 animals. 

The necessary work of the accreditation of a herd is conducted co-operatively 
by the State and owner. The drawing of the Mood from the animal, the tagging 
and proper identification of each animal and the necessary sanitary procedure are 
arranged for by and at the expense of the owner. The examination of the blood 
is made without charge by the State through the Division of Animal Industry, or 
may. at the expense of the owner, be made by any laboratory which is approved 
by the Director and which laboratory furnishes the Director a copy of the report. 

MISCELLANEOUS DISEASES 

Actinomycosis: Twenty-two head of cattle affected with this condition were 
reported. 

Blackleg: Preventive treatment was applied to 1,194 head of cattle on 122 
premises located in 44 towns. 

Glanders: Twelve horses were reported. Laboratory tests indicated that they 
were not affected with glanders. 

Hog Cholera and Hemorrhagic Septicemia: During the year there were 85,099 
treatments applied in connection with hog cholera; and 16,965 treatments for 
hemorrhagic septicemia. 

Mange: This condition was found in 2 head of cattle located on two premises. 

Tuberculosis in Swine: Thirty-seven cases found on post-morten examination at 
time of slaughter were reported. 

Specimens were submitted for examination and diagnosis for actinomycosis, 
anthrax, glanders, hemorrhagic septicemia, tuberculosis, tumors, etc. 

ANNUAL INSPECTION OF FARM ANIMALS AND PREMISES 

The usual order for inspection of all cattle, sheep and swine and of premises 
where kept was issued November 14, 1932, calling for completion of the inspection 
on or before January 1, 1933. 

From the reports received from the Inspectors of Animals of all cities and towns 
in the Commonwealth, there were inspected on 24,956 premises: 209,653 head of 
cattle, 10,992 sheep, 74,569 swine. 

Meetings of Inspectors of Animals were held during the year at Boston, Green- 
field, Pittsfield, Springfield, Worcester, and Barnstable. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Appropriation for the salary of the Director, Chapter 

174, Acts of 1933 (as reduced by Chapter 105) . $3,734.00 
Expended during the year for the salary of the Di- 
rector $3,733.33 

Unexpended balance 0.67 

$3,734.00 

Appropriation for personal services of clerks and 
stenographers, Chapter 174, Acts of 1933, (as 

reduced by Chapter 105) $23,160.00 

Expended during the year for personal services of 

clerks and stenographers $21,976.21 

Unexpended balance 1,183.79 

$23,160.00 

Appropriation for services other than personal, 
including printing the annual report, traveling 
expenses of the Director, office supplies and 
equipment and rent, Chapter 174, Acts of 1933 $14,400.00 

Brought forward from 1932 appropriation 19.67 

Brought forward from small items 14.42 

Total amount appropriated $14,434.09 



P. D. 98 9 

Expended during the year for the following 
purposes: 

Books and maps $21.75 

Express and messenger service 260.55 

Postage • 2,772.86 

Printing report 37.12 

Other printing .'.... 873.52 

Telephone and telegrams 668.56 

Travel 897.65 

Stationery and office supplies 1,235.62 

Rent and office equipment 5,862.20 

Total expenditure $12,629.83 

Unexpended balance 1,804.26 

$14,434.09 

Appropriation for personal services of veterinarians 
and agents engaged in the work of extermination 
of contagious diseases among domestic animals, 
Chapter 174, Acts of 1933 (as reduced by Chap- 
ter 105) $85,400.00 

Allotment, Chapter 296, Acts of 1933 180.00 

Total amount appropriated $85,580.00 

Expended during the year for the following pur- 
poses : 

Services of salaried agents $39,864.17 

Services of per diem agents -. 40,817.90 

Labor hired 104.00 

Total expenditure $80,786.07 

Unexpended balance 4,793.93 

$85,580.00 

Appropriation for the traveling expenses of veter- 
inarians and agents, including the cost of any 
motor vehicles purchased for their use, Chapter 

174, Acts of 1933 { $28,650.00 

I 66.25 

Brought forward from 1932 appropriation 1.37 

Total amount appropriated $28,717.62 

Expended during the year for traveling expenses of 

agents $28,296.61 

Unexpended balance 421.01 

$28,717.62 

Appropriation for reimbursement of owners of horse ■ 
killed during the present and previous years; 
travel, when allowed, of inspectors of animals, 
incidental expenses of killing and burial, quaran- 
tine and emergency services and for laboratory 
and veterinary supplies and equipment, Chapter 

174, Acts of 1933 $6,500.00 

Brought forward from 1932 appropriation 13.95 

Total amount appropriated $6,513.95 

Expended during the year for the following pur- 
poses : 

Supplies for veterinary inspectors $272.61 

Laundry 461.43 

Antiseptics, biologies and disinfectants 332.58 

Thermometers, needles, syringes, etc 388.80 

Ear-tags, punches, chains, etc 1,604.10 



10 P. D. 98 

Expenses of killing and burial 99.50 

Expenses of travel allowed inspectors <»f animals. . . . 608.45 

Quarantine expenses 1,057.00 



li,513.95 



Total expenditure $4,824.47 

Unexpended balance 1,089.48 

Appropriation for reimbursement <»f owners of tuber- 
cular cattle killed, as authorized by section 
twelve A o\' chapter L29 of the General Laws, in- 
serted by section 1 of chapter 304 of the Acts of 
1924, and in accordance with certain provisions 
of law and agreements made under authority of 
section 33 of chapter 129 of the Genera] Laws, 
as amended during the present and previous 

year, Chapter 171, Acts of 1933 $500,000.00 

Brought forward from 1932 appropriation 51,476.05 

Total amount appropriated $551,476.05 

Expended during tin' year for the following: 
17,633 head of cattle killed (chapter 129, General 

Laws as amended) $472,045.29 

90 head of cattle killed (physical cases including no 

lesion cases) 1,942.00 



$551,476.05 



Total expenditure $473,987.29 

Unexpended balance 77,488.76 

Reimbursement of towns for inspectors of animals: 

Appropriation for the reimbursement of certain towns 

for compensation paid to inspectors of animals, 

chapter 174, Acts of 1933 / $5,500.00 

\ 42.50 
Transferred from Small Items 28.57 

Total amount appropriated $5,571.07 

Expended during the year for reimbursement of 

certain towns $5,468.89 

Unexpended balance 102.18 

$5,571.07 



The average amount paid for cattle slaughtered under the provisions of Chapter 
129, General Laws, as amended, was $46.86 for registered purebred cattle and 
$25.70 for grade cattle. 

There has been received during the year for dog fees in accordance with Chapter 
347, Acts of 1928, $3.00; and for Hemorrhagic Septicemia treatments at Brighton 
$580.75. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Evan F. Richardson, 

Director. 



Public Document 



No. 98 



Che Commontoealtt) of 4tta&£ac^u£ett£ 



ANNUAL REPORT 



DIRECTOR OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY 



FOR THE 



Year ending November 30, 1934 




Offices: 20 Somerset Street, Boston 



Publication of this Document approved by the Commission on Administration and Finance 
750. o-':}5. Order 4474. 



€bc Commontoealtl) of i&a$$atliu$ctt0 
DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION 

DIVISION OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY 
To tlu Commissioner of Conservation: 

The report of the work of this Division for the year ending November 30, 1034, 
is herewith submitted: 

On January 28th Evan F. Richardson, Director of the Division since June I. 
1928, was succeeded by Edgar I>. Gillett of Westfield. 

On May 3rd Dr. M. L. Miner of Greenfield was retired, as required by Chapter 32 
of the Genera] Laws, Tercentenary Edition. His connection with the work of 
animal disease control dated from 1895. In 191 1 he was appointed as Veterinary 
Health Officer and assigned to the Franklin County district. Credit to a great 
extent is due him for the fact that Franklin County was the second in the Common- 
wealth to he declared a modified accredited area, and also for his unswerving interest 
and vigilance in all matters pertaining to his district and to the uut'w^ of his office. 

BOVINE TIHKRCULOSIS 

It has been a year of unusual activity particularly in connection with the work 
pertaining to the tuberculin testing for the eradication of bovine tuberculosis. 

On November 30, 1933, there were remaining 125 towns and cities from which 
petitions for an area test, as provided by Chapter 123, Acts of 1930, had not been 
received, or where area work was not completed. In three of these towns there are 
no cattle kept. 

On March 14, 1934, the area test law referred to (Chapter 123, Acts of 1930) 
was amended by Chapter 96, Acts of 1934, as follows: 

( 'hapter 96. — An Act Providing for the Ultimate Elimination of Diseaskd 

Cattle from the Commonwealth 

Chapter one hundred and twenty-nine of the General Laws is hereby amended 
by striking out section thirty-three B, as appearing in the Tercentenary Edition 
thereof, and inserting in place thereof the following: — Section SSB. The director 
may, upon application to him by not less than seventy-five percent of the cattle 
owners owning cattle permanently kept in any city or town, or upon like appli- 
cation by the owners of eighty-five per cent of such cattle, declare said city or 
town a quarantine area and may proceed to test by the tuberculin test or otherwise 
all bovine animals within said area. Whenever not less than eighty-five percent 
of the cattle permanently kept in the commonwealth are being tested for bovine 
tuberculosis under the supervision of the director or of the appropriate federal 
officials, the director may declare the entire commonwealth to be a quarantine 
area and may proceed to test by the tuberculin test or otherwise all bovine animals 
within the commonwealth. If the director finds and declares that such a city 
or town or the commonwealth, as the case may be, is substantially free from bovine 
tuberculosis, he may proclaim it to constitute a modified accredited area and 
may prescribe rules and regulations, subject to the approval of the governor and 
council, prohibiting the shipment or transportation into the same of any bovine 
animals without a permit and health certificate issued by the director or some 
officer designated by the director for the purpose. Whoever violates the terms 
and conditions of any such quarantine or any such rule or regulation shall be 
punished by a fine of not more than five hundred dollars or by imprisonment for 
not more than one year, or both. (Approved March 14, 1934.) 

On July 2 more than 85% of the cattle permanently kept in the Commonwealth 
were tuberculin tested under State supervision and the Commonwealth was declared 
under quarantine. Additional veterinarians were assigned for testing and on 
November 30th testing, with a few scattered exceptions, had been completed on 
all premises where one or more head of cattle are maintained. 



P. D. 98 



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4 P. D. 98 

In the interest of :ill concerned it was deemed advisable to make a concentrated 
drive to complete tuberculin testing of all herds in the Commonwealth during the 
1934 fiscal year. It was evident, however, that there was not a sufficient sum of 
money appropriated tor services and travel expenses of veterinarians and agents. 
The United States Bureau of Animal Industry through Dr. E. A. Crossrnan, 
Federal Inspector in Charge in Massachusetts, came to the assistance of the 
Division witli the offer of the services of additional Federal veterinarians, thus 
making it possible t<» complete the area test by November 30th. If it had not 
been for the assistance of the United States Bureau of Animal Industry and the 
wholehearted support and personal interest of Dr. Grossman it would have been 
impossible to have completed the work on the date set. 

The preceding, page 3, tables are a record of the work accomplished in the 
tuberculin testing of cattle. 

COUXTY STATISTICS — 1934 





I'nder Test 


Accredited 


Clean 


Reactors Last Tbsi 




Herds 


Head 


Herds 


Head 


Herds 


Head 


Herds 


Head 


Reactors 


Barnstable 


628 


2,241 


251 


1,237 


377 


1,004 




_ 


_ 


Berkshire 


2,324 


26,666 


1 .297 


19,981 


976 


5,386 


51 


1 ,299 


74 


Bristol 


2,742 


19,470 


533 


7,327 


1,770 


7,743 


a:v.i 


4,400 


2,620 


Dukes 


156 


820 


35 


286 


121 


534 


- 


- 


- 


Essex 


1 .721' 


13,153 


620 


7,469 


1,032 


4,521 


70 


1,163 


288 


Franklin 


2.204 


21,061 


1 ,526 


1K,886 


676 


2,149 


2 


26 


3 


Hampden 


2,083 


14,594 


679 


7,768 


1,214 ' 


5,444 


190 


1 ,382 


694 


Hampshire 


2.287 


19,626 


042 


12,215 


1,251 


6,130 


94 


1,281 


652 


Middlesex 


2,634 


21,336 


886 


11,608 


1 ,595 


8,021 


153 


1,707 


707 


Nantucket 


43 


453 


6 


76 


•70 


61 


15 


316 


107 


Norfolk . 


1,156 


8,877 


381 


4,680 


694 


3,484 


81 


713 


291 


Plymouth 


1,883 


10,564 


464 


4,979 


1,282 


4,448 


137 


1,137 


509 


Suffolk . 


16 


166 


5 


54 


5 


9 


6 


103 


56 


Worcester 


5,343 


49,084 


2,287 


32,406 


2,820 


14,358 


236 


2,320 


825 


Total 


25,221 


208,111 


9,912 


128,972 


13,835 


63,292 


1,474 







Note: The above table gives for the first time accurate information as to the cattle population of thc 
State and also the number of infected herds and cattle in each county at time of hast entire county test. 

Tuberculin testing for the eradication of bovine tuberculosis is conducted co- 
operatively with the United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of Animal 
Industry, the actual work of testing being conducted by veterinarians employed 
or authorized by the Commonwealth and by veterinarians in the employ of the 
Federal Government. The work this year was done by: 

State veterinarians (salary) .... 

State veterinarians (per diem) 

State veterinarians (paid by owner) 

Federal veterinarians ..... 

32,554 272,553 15,557 

The law, Chapter 129, General Laws, Tercentenary Edition, under the provisions 
of which tuberculin testing has been conducted, was amended in June by Chapter 
272, Acts of 1934, as follows: 



Herds 


Head 


Reactors 


5,918 


52,680 


2,419 


17,266 


160,929 


2,488 


91 


1,929 


23 


9,279 


57,015 


10,627 



Chapter 272. — An Act Relative to the Payment of Compensation for the 
Slaughtering of Animals Reacting to the Tuberculin Test 

Section thirty-three of chapter one hundred and twenty-nine of the General 
Laws, as appearing in the Tercentenary Edition, is hereby amended by inserting 
after the word "segregation" in the tenth line the word: — , sale, — and by inserting 
after the word "animal" the second time it occurs in the thirty-first line the follow- 
ing: — ; and provided, further, that no payment shall be made for any animal if, 
since the previous test, the owner or his representative has violated the rules and 



P. D. 98 5 

regulations made hereunder; and provided, further, that the owner or his repre- 
sentative has not unlawfully or improperly obtained or attempted to obtain reim- 
bursement for any animal, — so as to read as follows : — 

Section 33. — Except as otherwise provided, a person who has animals tested 
with tuberculin shall not be entitled to compensation from the commonwealth 
for any animals which react to the tuberculin test unless they have been tested 
by the director or qualified veterinarians acting under his authorization and have 
been owned and kept by the owner applying for the test on the premises where 
tested for a period of not less than sixty days next prior to the date of said test or 
have been admitted to the herd on a test approved by the director. The director 
may prescribe rules and regulations for the inspection of cattle by the application 
of the tuberculin test and for the segregation, sale or slaughter of reacting animals; 
but no inspection by the application of such test shall be made unless an agreement 
has previously been entered into for such inspection and application with the owner 
of the animals, except as provided in section thirty- three B. If, in the opinion of 
the director, any of the animals react to the test and are slaughtered in consequence 
thereof, the owner shall be reimbursed by the commonwealth in the manner here- 
inafter provided. The director may appoint persons to make appraisals of reacting 
cattle in conjunction with the owner or his authorized representative. Such 
appraisal shall be subject to the rights of arbitration and petition set forth in 
section thirty-one; provided, that the award or damages shall be within the limits 
prescribed by this section. The commonwealth shall, within thirty days after 
the filing in the office of the director of a valid claim for reimbursement in pursuance 
. of such an appraisal or of an award under section thirty-one, pay to the owner of 
any animal slaughtered under authority of any rules or regulations made here- 
under, or to any mortgagee or assignee designated in writing by said owner, one 
half of the difference between the amount received by the owner for the carcass of 
the animal and the value of the animal as determined by appraisal as aforesaid; 
provided, that payment by the commonwealth hereunder shall not exceed fifty 
dollars for any grade animal or seventy-five dollars for any pure-bred animal; 
and provided, further, that no payment shall be made for any animal if, since the 
previous test, the owner or his representative has violated the rules and regulations 
made hereunder; and provided, further, that the owner or his representative has 
not unlawfully or improperly obtained or attempted to obtain reimbursement for 
any animal; and provided, further, that the owner or his representative has not, 
in the opinion of the director, by wilful act or neglect, contributed to the spread 
of bovine tuberculosis. (Approved June 7, 1934.) 

By this change the State is given authority to supervise to some extent the 
salvaging of reactor cattle. The law also defines more clearly the conditions 
under which reimbursement may or may not be approved. 

Changing conditions in connection with the conduct of the work made it impera- 
tive that the rules and regulations in force since August, 1922, be changed to 
comply with present-day requirements and accordingly the following rules and 
regulations were submitted to the Governor and Council and were approved 
October 10, 1934. 



Rules and Regulations Applying to the Tuberculin Testing of Cattle 

Under the Provisions of Section 33, Chapter 1 29, General Laws and 

Amendments Thereto 

1. An owner of cattle desiring assistance from the Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts in the eradication of bovine tuberculosis if found in his cattle and in the 
maintenance of his herd free from said disease may request the Director of Animal 
Industry to have a tuberculin test applied in accordance with Section 33, Chapter 
129 of the General Laws, T. E., and amendments thereto. Such request shall be 
made on forms prescribed by said Director and shall be signed by the owner or 
his legally authorized representative. 



8 P. D. 98 

2. Said owner or his said representative shall agree to comply with these rules 
and regulations and such additional rules and regulations as the said Director 
from time to time may prescribe. 

3. Before t ho tuberculin test is applied the owner or his said representative 
shall give complete information as to all cattle owned by him; location of premises 
where kept; where, when, from whom and the price at which said herd or indi- 
vidual members thereof were purchased; the name and address of any person 
holding a claim on said herd or individual members thereof and the amount and 
nature of such claim; and shall state whether he has ever owned (or had an interest 
in) any cattle tested under State supervision and if so, when and where located. 

4. Said owner or his said representative shall submit his entire herd on any one 
premises for inspection and a tuberculin test at such times and by such methods 
as may be considered necessary by said Director. 

5. The identity of every animal to which a tuberculin test is applied shall be 
established by the insertion in its external right ear of a metal tag provided by 
said Director, or by a certificate of its registration as a pure bred animal, or by 
any other method deemed practicable by said Director. 

ti. The owner shall keep a record by registration name or tag number, or by 
any other method deemed practicable by said Director, of all cattle in his herd. 

7. (a) Any animal which reacts to the test shall be identified by the insertion 
of a reactor tag in its external left ear and by the letter T branded on its left jaw 
and such animal shall not be disposed of in any way or leave the premises where 
tested except for immediate slaughter, or for segregation in accordance with a 
special agreement made by the owner or his said representative with said Director. 

(b) Said animal shall be appraised at a fair and just estimate of its market value, 
and if to be slaughtered said owner or his said representative shall make all arrange- 
ments therefor, shall pay all expenses incurred thereby and shall before the animal 
is slaughtered give due notice to said Director as to time and place of slaughter. 
Except by special written agreement said animal must when leaving the premises 
where tested go direct to said place of slaughter. If compensation is to be claimed 
said slaughter shall take place within 30 days of date of appraisal, except that in 
extraordinary and meritorious cases and at the discretion of the Director, such 
limit of 30 days may be waived. 

(c) The owner or his said representative shall obtain not less than three signed 
bids from responsible parties and these bids must be submitted to the Director for 
his approval prior to the sale of reacting cattle. The owner, his said representative, 
or the Director may reject any or all bids. The Director may waive in writing 
any part or all of this requirement if in his opinion it is deemed advisable. 

(d) If segregated, its dairy products shall be completely pasteurized before 
being used for any purpose whatever.* 

8. An owner of cattle slaughtered under the provisions of said Section 33 shall 
make affidavit on forms prescribed by the Director as to the amount of money 
received from the sale or disposal of the reacting animals and such other information 
as the Director may consider necessary. 

9. Thorough cleansing and disinfection of premises, and any repairs found 
necessary shall be made immediately after removal of reactors and shall be made 
by the owner who shall provide and pay for all materials used and the labor em- 
ployed. Said cleansing, disinfection and repairs necessary therefor shall be done 
in accordance with the requirements of said Director or his representative and 
may be officially supervised if deemed necessary. 

10. An owner who has availed himself of a tuberculin test under the provisions 
of these rules and regulations shall purchase or obtain only such bovine animals 
except for immediate slaughter as have the approval of the Director, namely, 
animals direct from a herd declared as a tuberculosis free herd, and shall at time 
of purchase or of obtaining same give notice to the Director as to identification of 
said animal or animals. 



♦Extract from Chapter 94, Section 19, "... no person . . . shall sell . . . milk produced . . . from 
sick or diseased cows." A cow declared to be a reactor is regarded as a diseased animal. 



P. D 98 7 

11. An owner claiming indemnity is entitled to payment for reactors to one 
first or original test only and for reactors to any subsequent test or retest provided 
all such reactors are identified as in herd at time of previous test, as born into the 
herd since time of previous test, or as admitted to the herd or obtained in accordance 
with section 10 of these rules and regulations. 

12. These rules and regulations shall supersede the rules and regulations approved 
in Council July 12, 1922, and August 18, 1926. 

E. L. GlLLETT, 

Director of Animal Industry. 
Approved : 

Samuel A. York, 

Commissioner. Approved in Council (October 10, 1934) : 

Approved as to form : 

Charles F. Lovejoy, William L. Reed, 

Assistant Attorney-General. . Executive Secretary . 

Under Section seven, paragraph (c), if three or more head of cattle react it is 
now required that at least three written bids be obtained. This requirement has 
already resulted in higher salvage to the owner and a corresponding saving to the 
Commonwealth. 

On April 25th Berkshire County was declared a modified accredited area by 
the Federal Department, — i.e., an area in which less than one-half of one per cent 
of reaction resulted from a tuberculin test of all bovine animals in the County. 
On August 1st Dukes County was also declared a modified accredited area. There 
are now four counties in the State rated as modified accredited areas : — 

Barnstable County in June, 1929. Berkshire County in April, 1934. 

Franklin County in December, 1932. Dukes County in October, 1934. 

Thorough cleansing and proper disinfection of premises from which reactor 
animals have been removed is quite as important as the removal of the reactors 
themselves. As a means of obtaining more efficient results veterinarians are now 
required not only to instruct owners as to what should be done but to also inform 
them as to the quantity of crude disinfectant which must be used to make solution 
enough to properly saturate the area used for housing the entire herd, as it is 
required that regardless of the number of reactors, one or more, the whole area 
must be gone over. Inspectors of animals are informed as to how many cattle 
were included in the test, the number of reactors, and the amount of disinfectant 
recommended. An addressed postal card form is left with the owner on which to 
indicate the date the last reactor left the premises and the date disinfection was 
completed. Upon receipt of this card from the owner an additional notice is sent 
to the Inspector of Animals. 

The average appraisal of reactors this year was $66.53; the average salvage was 
$14.45. 

Tuberculin testing under the accredited herd plan was started by the United 
States Bureau of Animal Industry in cooperation with the livestock authorities of 
the different States in the year 1917. It was not however until August, 1922, 
that the Commonwealth of Massachusetts entered into the work. The percentage 
of infection in the State was found very high, varying from 9.35% to 52.77% in the 
several counties. 

The work of completing the first test on all premises where cattle are kept having 
now been accomplished the following additional tabulations should be of value: 



8 



I'. I). 98 



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P. D. 98 9 

In addition to the $4,028,298.53 expended by the Commonwealth as reimburse- 
ments to cattle owners, said owners received reimbursements amounting to $2,720,- 
686.93 from the United States Government, making a grand total of $6,748,985.46. 

The award allowed an owner is figured by subtracting the amount received by 
the owner from the sale for immediate slaughter of each reactor animal from the 
agreed estimated market value of said animal, such payment limited to amounts 
which have varied as follows: 

State : 

August 1, 1922, to December 1, 1928:— }/& of the difference, not to exceed $25 
for a grade or $50 for a pure bred animal. 

December 1, 1928, to date: — 3^ of the difference, not to exceed $50 for a grade 
or $75 for a pure bred animal. 
Federal: 



July, 1917, to February, 1929: 



of the difference, not to exceed $25 for a 



grade or $50 for a pure bred animal. 

February, 1929, to July, 1931: — y% of the difference, not to exceed $35 for a grade 
or $70 for a pure bred animal. 

July, 1931, to July, 1932: — }4 of the difference, not to exceed $25 for a grade or 
$50 for a pure bred animal. 

July, 1932, to date: — ^ of the difference, not to exceed $20 for a grade or $50 
for a pure bred animal. 

The following table indicates accurately the extent of infection in each county 
prior to and at time of the first test conducted under State supervision, also the 
percentage on November 30, 1934: 





Tuberculin Tests Applied 




Per cent 








Per cent 
Reactors 


Infection 










Nov. 30, 1934 




Herds 


Head 


Reactors 






Barnstable 


1,124 


3,227 


302 


9.35 


0. 


Berkshire 






2,935 


28,543 


6,137 


21.50 


.27 


Bristol . 






2,969 


20,377 


10,599 


52.01 


13.45 


Dukes . 






193 


953 


123 


12.90 


0. 


Essex . 






2,073 


16,550 


7,909 


47.78 


8.84 


Franklin 






2,659 


22,243 


3,574 


16.06 


.12 


Hampden 






2,426 


18,639 


7,260 


38.95 


4.75 


Hampshire 






2,635 


22,095 


7,623 


34.50 


3.32 


Middlesex 






3,348 


28,271 


14,920 


52.77 


3.31 


Nantucket 






50 


506 


137 


27.07 


23.62 


Norfolk 






1,585 


10,515 


4,434 


42.16 


3.27 


Plymouth 






2,312 


11,969 


3,472 


29.01 


4.81 


Suffolk . 






37 


382 


174 


45.55 


33.73 


Worcester 






6,380 


61,643 


28,706 


46.56 


1.68 




30,726 


245,913 


95,320 


38.7 


3.28 



Cattle Reported as- Showing Physical Symptoms of Disease 
The work in connection with this classification is authorized under Chapter 129, 
Section 28 (requiring report of the existence of contagious disease in domestic 
animals), Section 11 (examination and condemnation of animals found to be 
affected with tuberculosis), and Section 12-A (payment for cattle condemned). 

During the year there have been reported in herds where tuberculin testing had 
not been conducted, forty-four head of cattle included in this classification. Of 
this number twenty-six were found to be affected with tuberculosis, five died 
prior to being examined, and thirteen were released as physical examination did 
not indicate tuberculosis. 

Quarantine Station — Brighton 
All cattle intended for dairy purposes consigned to this station must be accom- 
panied by a certificate indicating that they are from tuberculosis-free supervised 
herds. Cattle on which satisfactory certificates are not available are held for 
retest. 



10 P. D. 98 

Purchasers of cattle at the sales hum ure furnished eertificutes (upon request) 
showing status of the animal or animals purchased. 

Then' were 1 1.N70 dairy cuttle received at the market this year. Of this number 
90 were held for reteet. Of the above number 1,956 were from points in Massachu- 
setts, of which 3 were held for retest. Of these (9,758 interstate, and L,786 State) 
11,544 were acceptable as additions to accredited herds. Three hundred twenty- 
six (326), (217 interstate and 109 State) were acceptable only as additions to herds 
not accredited. 





Disposition 








Interstate 


State 


Totat 


To Massachusetts 


8,388 


1,891 


10,279 


Connecticut 


79 


1 


80 


Rhode Island 


1,415 


02 


1,477 


Maine 


11 


- 


11 


New Hampshire . 


18 


2 


20 


Vermont 


3 


- 


3 



9,914 1,956 11,870 

Four thousand sixty-eight (4,068) Massachusetts reactors were received at the 
reactor yard of the Quarantine Station — 4,066 arriving by truck and two (2) by 
train. These reactors were, as in the past, identified and released on special 
permit for immediate slaughter at establishments under Federal inspection or on 
the premises of the Brighton Abattoir. 

All trucks and cars conveying reactors have been cleansed and disinfected. 
One thousand three hundred ninety (1,390) trucks taking dairy cattle from the 
market were disinfected before loading. 

As required in previous years, the sales barn has been cleaned and disinfected 
at frequent intervals during the year. 

Preventive hemorrhagic septicemia or shipping fever inoculations were given 
at ow ? ners' request to 4,139 head of cattle. This service is furnished owners prac- 
tically at cost. 

Total receipts of livestock at the station during the year were as follows: 41,170 
cattle; 70,585 calves; 8,138 sheep and lambs; and 22,603 swine. 

Interstate Movement of Cattle Into Massachusetts 

All cattle transported into Massachusetts, unless consigned direct to the quar- 
antine stations at Brighton and Somerville or to a Federal inspected slaughter 
house, must, by Massachusetts law, Department Order No. 43, be accompanied 
by a certificate of health in the form of an approved record of tuberculin test and 
by a permit issued by the Director of the Massachusetts Division of Animal Indus- 
try. Four thousand two hundred fifty-four (4,254) permits were issued, of which 
162 were for cattle intended for exhibition purposes. This year there were received : 
at Brighton, 9,914; at other points, on permit, 23,371; total, 33,285. 

Origin of interstate cattle received at Brighton was as follows: 



Connecticut 

Maine 

New Hampshire 

New York 

Ohio 

Rhode Island . 

Vermont . 



Released 






on Papers 


Tested 


Total 


23 


— 


23 


5,868 


19 


5,887 


2,282 


31 


2,313 


113 


3 


116 


11 


- 


11 


13 


- 


13 


1,517 


34 


1,551 



9,827 87 9,914 



1 


New Hampshire 


4,749 


1,344 


New Jersey . 


34 


1,555 


New York 


388 


3 


Ohio . 


2,779 


244 


Pennsylvania 


1,017 


54 


Rhode Island 


578 


1,587 


Vermont 


6,339 


313 


Virginia 


5 


508 


Washington . 


3 


43 


Wisconsin 


1,827 



P. D. 98 11 

At other points: 

California 

Canada 

Connecticut 

Illinois 

Indiana . 

Iowa 

Maine 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Missouri . 

Total - 23,371 

Three hundred seventy-three (373) of the 33,285 were tested after arrival, — 
eighty-seven (87) at Brighton, and 287 at other points. 

In addition to the above there were received on permits 1,951 beef cattle and 
711 cattle for exhibition purposes. 

During the year 1,739 interstate tuberculin test certificates on 3,278 head of 
dairy cattle intended for interstate shipment from Massachusetts were issued. 

DROUGHT RELIEF CATTLE 

Unprecedented drought conditions throughout the Middle Western States 
during the summer months resulted in the death of many thousands of cattle 
through lack of food and water. As a relief measure the Federal Emergency 
Relief Administration under the National Recovery Act purchased large numbers 
of cattle in these areas for shipment to parts where they could be salvaged for food 
purposes by immediate slaughter, or to districts where they could be turned out 
to pasture to be brought back into condition suitable for slaughter. 

During the period between August 24 and November 9, 8,848 head were shipped 
into Massachusetts consigned to slaughtering establishments at Somerville and 
Brighton. 

In addition to that number there arrived 1,888 head for distribution for pasture 
purposes. These were unloaded under the supervision of representatives of this 
Division at the Quarantine Station of the United States Department of Agriculture 
located at Littleton, where they were watered, fed, and subjected to a tuberculin 
test. This test (intradermic method) was applied by Massachusetts veterinarians 
temporarily employed by the E. R. A. Of the total number tested, 49 reacted and 
were tagged, branded, and consigned to Brighton for slaughter. Lesions of tuber- 
culosis were found on post mortem examination in 28 of the 49 reactors, and in 
addition to the reactors, 28 head were rejected as unsuitable for pasture purposes 
and were slaughtered. 

All of these pasture cattle, in addition to a prominent government brand on the 
hip, were tagged with Massachusetts passed tags and were distributed as follows: 

Counties 

Barnstable 
Essex 
Middlesex 
Norfolk . 
Worcester 

Total 26 1,811 

By November 15 these cattle, with the exception of 30 head that had either died 
or been killed on account of accident, etc., were brought in from pasture and 
slaughtered. 

During the period these cattle were in pasture they were subjected to frequent 
inspection by veterinarians in the employ of this Division, who submitted regular 
written reports as to the general condition not only of the cattle but of the pastures- 



Premises 


Head 


1 


150 


9 


709 


2 


50 


2 


101 


12 


801 



12 1>. D. 98 

In addition to the pasture cattle there was received a shipment of 53 head of 
cattle for dairy purposes. These cattle arrived at Westport where they were 
immediately placed under quarantine by order of this Division. These cattle 
were subjected to a tuberculin test and passed. Twenty-seven (27) head were 
subsequently released for distribution in that section as dairy cattle; 2 of the 
animals died at pasture; and the remainder were eventually shipped to Brighton 
and slaughtered. 

BANC ABORTION DISEASE 

Interest in the blood testing of cattle for the detection of Bang Bacillus Disease 
(contagious abortion) has increased during the past year due largely to the an- 
nouncement of the Federal Government plan for the elimination of reactors to the 
agglutination or blood test under the provisions of the 1 so-called Jones-Connally Bill. 

Under this bill $50,000,000 were appropriated to be allotted to the several states 
for cattle disease control work. One project under this bill is the blood testing of 
cattle for owners whose herds are tuberculin tested under State and Federal super- 
vision and who make request for such test. Cattle that react are ear-tagged and 
also branded on the hip with the letter B. The owner arranges for the sale and 
slaughter of the reactors, the amount realized from the sale is retained by him, 
and, in addition, he is paid compensation to an amount not exceeding $20 on a 
grade animal and $50 on a pure bred animal. The obtaining of blood samples is 
arranged by the Federal Department without cost to the owner. He is obliged, 
however, to agree to comply with the rules and regulations of the State in which 
he is located which pertain to the establishment of Bang Bacillus Free Accredited 
Herds and, at the expiration of the Federal plan, to continue the blood testing of 
his herd under State supervision. 

Cooperation by this Division is given by the use of the laboratory of the State 
Department of Public Health in examining all blood samples, and through the 
services of veterinarians of this Division at the time of slaughter of reactors. 

Under this agreement tests have been conducted by the Federal Department in 
eighteen herds in which 857 cattle were tested with 168 reactors. All reactors 
were reported as slaughtered. 

An increasing demand for negative blood tested cattle for interstate shipment is 
also a factor in connection with this disease. The tendency on the part of an ever 
increasing number of livestock officials is toward requiring that all cattle moved 
interstate shall have passed a negative blood test. 

On July 1st, as a result of a meeting of the New England Live Stock officials, 
uniform regulations were adopted and put into effect forbidding the shipment into 
the New England States of blood reactors or cattle that had aborted. In accord- 
ance with this agreement the following order was issued: 

Order No. 44. 

(BANG ABORTION DISEASE) 

DEPARTMENT OF CONSERVATION 

Division of Animal Industry 

20 Somerset St., Boston, June 12, 1934. 

To Transportation Companies, Inspectors of Animals, and all Persons whom it may 
Concern: 

Division Order No. 42 is hereby revoked and the following Order submitted 
therefor: 

Whereas the disease known as Bang Abortion Disease (Contagious Abortion), 
which is a contagious disease and is so recognized under the laws of this Common- 
wealth, prevails extensively among cattle and 

Whereas it is deemed necessary, for the protection of the live stock interests of 
the Commonwealth, to restrict shipments into this Commonwealth of cattle 
assumed to be affected with this disease. 



P. D. 98 13 

Now therefore, acting under and by virtue of the authority vested in me by the 
provisions of Chapter 129 of the General Laws (Tercentenary Edition) and all 
Acts and Amendments thereof and in addition thereto, and all other authority me 
hereto enabling, I do hereby make the following order and regulation : — 

Sec. 1. On all bovine animals driven, shipped, or in any way transported to the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts from points outside thereof, if intended for 
dairy or breeding purposes, a statement, signed under the penalty of perjury by 
both the owner of said animals or his authorized representative and by the shipper, 
that to the best of their knowledge said animals are not affected with any infectious 
disease, have not aborted within the twelve month period next prior to date of 
shipment, and have not reacted to a field or laboratory test for Bang Abortion 
Disease (Contagious Abortion) must, except as provided in Section 2 of this order, 
accompany the certificate of tuberculin test as required by Department order 
No. 43 or must be forwarded direct to the office of the Director of Animal Industry 
of the Massachusetts Department of Conservation. 

Sec. 2. A bovine animal which has recently aborted or which has given a 
positive or suspicious reaction to a field or laboratory test for Bang Abortion 
Disease (Contagious Abortion) shall not be moved into the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts except upon and accompanied by a special permit issued by the 
Director of Animal Industry. 

Sec. 3. Any animal brought in on a permit as referred to in Section 2 of this 
order, if intended for dairy or breeding purposes, is hereby declared to be in quar- 
antine and must be held in isolation at the risk and expense of the person, firm or 
corporation owning same until released by order of the Director; or if intended 
for slaughter must be delivered direct to place of slaughter designated on the 
permit. 

Sec. 4. An animal as referred to in Section 3 of this order, after passing two 
approved negative blood tests for Bang Abortion Disease made after arrival and 
at least three months apart, may be released by the Director. 

This order shall be published by the Inspector of Animals in each city and town 
in the Commonwealth by filing a copy hereof with the City Clerk or Town Clerk 
as the case may be and by posting a copy hereof in a conspicuous public place 
within the city or town for which he is the Inspector of Animals. 

E. L. Gillett, 
Approved: Director of Animal Industry. 

Samuel A. York, Commissioner of Conservation. 
Approved in Council June 13, 1934: 

William L. Reed, Executive Secretary. 

During the year 14,137 samples of blood were examined. Of this number 1,024 
were declared positive, or reactors to the test. Eight (8) Abortion Free Accredited 
Herd certificates were issued on 193 head of cattle and twenty (20) herds containing 
838 head were reaccredited, making a total of twenty-eight (28) abortion free 
accredited herds containing 1,031 head of cattle. 

RABIES 

There was a decided increase in the number of animals affected with rabies 
reported the past year (319) over the number recorded in the year 1933 (175). 

It is hard to explain the apparent lack of interest in this disease on the part of 
the dog owning public — a disease of vital importance from the standpoint of 
human health as well as that of animal health — and a disease that invariably 
terminates fatally. 

Rabies can occur only as a result of actual contact with the saliva of an animal 
affected with that disease and can for that reason be eradicated only by the con- 
certed action of each and every person possessing dogs in adopting and following 
one of two courses — absolute restraint (quarantine) for a period of possibly six 
months, or by the universal application of rabies protective treatment (immun- 
ization). 



11 P. D. 98 

In several towns and cities in Greater BostoD clinics have beeo held the past year 
for the purpose of giving protective treatment to dogs, the Bervice being rendered 
free ill some instances and at a nominal cost to the owner in others. 

The increase in the number of persons reported as bitten is undoubtedly due to 
better compliance on the part of the physician with the law requiring such injuries 
to be reported and also to the rabies scares that are periodically given notoriety 
by the press. 

One person a child is recorded as having died of rabies during the year. 

The following table indicates the cases recorded for the year: 

Rabies 





Showing 






















Symptoms 




Contact 






Bite Cases 








OJ 






^ 






c 
c 










3 


— ' 


u 


'tri 

a 
i 


— c 


"3 


c a 
1 - 5 


1 3 


— c 






> | -2 
'3 a 3j 

'5) w QJ 




o 

-a 


i 


C C 

a <b 




1 E 






rt 




O *> 3 


<v 


TZ 


~ * J 


i z. 


— 


— -~ 


TZ C 


en O. 


o 




cu y. a 


* 


U 


u 


Q 


d 


U 


u 


5 


H 


Forward, Year 1933 




5 








4 








9 


December, 1933 


19 


23 


3 


- 


- 


206 


2 


13 


._ 


266 


January, 1934 


17 6 


8 


- 


2 


- 


234 


1 


7 


_ 


275 


February 


24 5 


7 


3 


- 


- 


210 


1 


8 


_ 


258 


March .... 


35 7 


101 


7 


4 


- 


364 


3 


9 


_ 


530 


April . . ' 


29 4 


33 


- 


1 


- 


464 


4 


12 


_ 


547 


May 


41 10 


33 


7 


- 


- 


338 


2 


10 


_ 


441 


June 


21 4 5 


42 


3 


3 


- 


901 


8 


24 


- 


1,011 


July 


32 14 7 


12 


3 


- 


- 


939 


6 


28 


_ 


1,041 


August ... 


23 6 3 


14 


37 


2 


- 


742 


3 


15 


— 


845 


September 


10 5 


20 


4 


10 


— 


487 


4 


22 


_ 


562 


October 


27 6 1 


24 


- 


- 


- 


437 


4 


8 


_ 


507 


November 


19 2 - 


12 


- 


- 


- 


311 


2 


5 


_ 


351 


Forward . . 


- - - 


- 


- 


- 


22 


- 


- 


- 


8 


30 


Total .... 


297 69 16 


334 


67 


22 


22 


5,637 


40 


161 


8 


6,673 


The above record refers to the 






















following animals: 






















Cats .... 


8 1 


2 


- 


- 


- 


8 


- 


17 


_ 


36 


Cattle 


2 3- 


41 


37 


5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


88 


Dogs ..... 


287 65 16 


283 


30 


17 


22 


5,620 


40 


142 


8 


6,530 


Squirrels .... 


_ _ _ 


- 


— 


- 


- 


- 


— 


2 


_ 


2 


Goats ..... 


_ _ _ 


2 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 




_ 


2 


Poultry .... 


_ _ _ 


6 


- 


_ 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


6 


Monkeys .... 


_- - - 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


Rabbits 


_ _ _ 


— 


- 


— 


— 


8 


- 


- 


- 


8 



*No symptoms of rabies. 



Total positive cases, 319 



One hundred fifteen (115) persons were bitten by rabid animals: 305 persons 
were exposed. Laboratory examination was made of the brains of 489 animals, 
of which 242 were positive, 235 negative, and 12 questionable. 



MISCELLANEOUS DISEASES 

Actinomycosis: Nineteen (19) head of cattle affected with this condition were 
reported. 

Blackleg: Preventive treatment was applied to 1,494 head of cattle on 166 prem- 
ises located in 51 towns. 

Glanders: Seventeen (17) horses were reported. Laboratory tests indicated that 
they were not affected with glanders. 

Hog Cholera and Hemorrhagic Septicemia: During the year there were 84,230 
treatments applied in connection with hog cholera; and 14,408 treatments for 
hemorrhagic septicemia. 

Mange: This condition was found in 38 head of cattle located on 6 premises. 

Tuberculosis in Swine: Four (4) cases found on post mortem examination at time 
of slaughter were reported. 



P. D. 98 15 

Specimens were submitted for examination and diagnosis for actinomycosis, 
anthrax, glanders, hemorrhagic septicemia, tuberculosis, tumors, forage poisoning, 
etc. 

ANNUAL INSPECTION OF FARM ANIMALS AND PREMISES 

The usual order for inspection of all cattle, sheep and swine and of the premises 
where kept was issued November 1, 1933, calling for completion of the inspection 
on or before January 1, 1934. 

From the reports received from the Inspectors of Animals of all cities and towns 
in the Commonwealth, there were inspected on 25,042 premises: 208,852 head of 
cattle, 10,440 sheep, and 68,301 swine. 

Meetings of Inspectors of Animals were held during the year at Boston, Green- 
field, Pittsfield, and Worcester. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Appropriation for the salary of the Director, Chapter 

162, Acts of 1934 (as adjusted by Chapter 213) . $3,689.00 

Expended during the year for the salary of the Di- 
rector $3,688.88 

Unexpended balance 0.12 

$3,689.00 



Appropriation for personal services of clerks and 
stenographers, Chapter 162, Acts of 1934 (as 
adjusted by Chapter 213) $21,814.00 

Transferred from the*Appropriation for Extraordinary 

Expenses 560.00 

Total amount appropriated $22,374.00 

Expended during the year for personal services of 

clerks and stenographers $22,373.77 

Unexpended balance 0.23 

$22,374.00 

Appropriation for services other than personal, 
including printing the annual report, traveling 
expenses of the Director, office supplies and 
equipment and rent, Chapter 162, Acts of 1934 $14,400.00 

Expended during the year for the above mentioned 

purposes $12,765.29 

Unexpended balance 1,634.71 

$14,400.00 

Appropriation for personal services of veterinarians 
and agents engaged in the work of extermination 
of contagious diseases among domestic animals, 
Chapter 162, Acts of 1934 (as adjusted by Chap- 
ter 213) $86,760.00 

Expended during the year for the following pur- 
poses: 

Services of salaried agents $36,535.28 

Services of per diem agents 42,462.75 

Labor hired 104.00 



$86,760.00 



Total expenditure $79,102.03 

Unexpended balance 7,657.97 

Appropriation for traveling expenses of veterinarians 
and agents, including the cost of any motor vehi- 
cles purchased for their use, Chapter 162, Acts of 
1934 $30,000.00 

Supplemental Budget, Chapter 384, Acts of 1934 . . . 2,500.00 

Total amount appropriated $32,500.00 



16 I\ D. 98 

Expended during the year for traveling expenses of 

agents $32,202.42 

Unexpended balance 297.58 

$32,500.00 

Appropriation for reimbursement <>f owners of horses 

killed during the present and previous years; 
travel, when allowed, of inspectors of animals, 
incidental expenses of killing and burial, quaran- 
tine and emergency services and for laboratory 
and veterinary supplies and equipment, Chapter 
162, Acts of 1934 $0,500.00 

Expended during the year for the above mentioned 

purposes $4,787.30 

Unexpended balance 1,712.70 

$6,500.00 

Appropriation for reimbursement of owners of tuber- 
cular cattle killed, as authorized by Section 
twelve A of Chapter 129 of the General Laws, as 
appearing in the Tercentenary Edition thereof, 
and in accordance with certain provisions of law 
and agreements made under authority of Section 
33 of said Chapter 129 as so appearing, during the 
present and previous year, Chapter 162, Acts of 

1934 $350,000.00 

Brought forward from 1933 appropriation 77,488.76 

Total amount appropriated $427,488.76 

Expended during the year for the following: 
14,962 head of cattle killed (Chapter 129, General 

Laws as amended) *. $369,940.71 

25 head of cattle killed (physical cases) 565.00 



$427,488.76 



Total expenditure $370,505.71 

Unexpended balance 56,983.05 

Reimbursement of towns for inspectors of animals: 

Appropriation for the reimbursement of certain towns 

for compensation paid to inspectors of animals, 

Chapter 162, Acts of 1934 ./ $5,500.00 

Brought forward from 1933 Appropriation 0.75 

Total amount appropriated $5,500.75 

Expended during the year for reimbursement of 

certain towns $5,028.40 

Unexpended balance 472.35 

$5,500.75 

The average amount paid for cattle slaughtered under the provisions of Chapter 
129, General Laws, as amended, was $48.21 for registered purebred cattle and 
$23.90 for grade cattle. 

There has been received during the year for dog fees in accordance with Chapter 
347, Acts of 1928, $1.00; for Hemorrhagic Septicemia treatments at Brighton 
$620.85; and for damage to a State car $26.60. 



/ 



Respectfully submitted, 

E. L.Gillett, 

Director. 



/ 



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